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View Full Version : Do you prefer Terry L over Unison?


AnnaLisa
11-24-2017, 09:22 AM
Hello guys,

I am thinking about Terry L, I have some. I also have Unison.
I was checking these pastels with one of my papers to see how the difference is.

I wonder why Terry L sticks are so expensive. I bought some for a couple of years ago and they have gone up like a raket in price.

So I wonder, if you prefer Terry L over Unison, Why?

I know that Terry L has some colors that others don't have, and the square shape, but other than that?

water girl
11-25-2017, 02:37 AM
That's a tough question for me. I use both. I don't find that TLs are any different as far as being used up any quicker than Unison. For me, it's the colors. I usually layer in with a Nupastel first, followed by Rembrandts, Jack Richeson or Mungyo Gallery (not student grade) soft pastels. I find those three brands to be medium soft. I try to save the TLs and Unison for the rest of the layers. I hope that helps.

*Deirdre*
12-01-2017, 05:17 AM
I totally agree with Karen and do much the same as she does.

robertsloan2
12-05-2017, 09:01 AM
I like them both in different ways. My guess is the Ludwigs are even heavier in pigment, because of their relative softness. Unison are medium-soft, about halfway between Rembrandt and Ludwig. Ludwig are deceptively chunky and super-super soft, they wear down faster, they go on over anything else. So for me, they're different categories.

I prefer Unison, but both are in my "love them" brands. I would not want to do without V100, the black-violet eggplant that's actually darker than black but richer with a strong violet hue. It's better than black and awesome.

Main thing is, that's personal. I found out by trial and error that I don't prefer the super-super soft ones to a soft-medium hand rolled. If I had to have just one set of pastels it would be my 120 Unison half sticks. Since I don't, I have at least half a dozen good artist grade brands with extremely different textures that I use in different ways on different papers or at different stages.

I like painting hard to soft. Therefore my Ludwigs are finishers, the ones to go on after everything else for heavy opaque accents and final touches. Senneliers are good for that too.

My main frustration with Ludwigs is the lack of bright greens, the greens range is extensive but all of it muted or something. I do actually use the blazing emerald greens and acid greens and so on, but Terry Ludwig leans toward turquoise and olive without much in the mid greens and then those are grayed. While this may work for some landscapes, it doesn't work for all landscapes and it leaves out things like dumpsters, go-lights, tricycles, the stripe in the rainbow flag... those things that do come out an artificial green color. That's always frustrated me about them. I love the cerise and reds range though, Ludwig has wonderful vibrant reds and cerises.

Then again, Unison has great greens but the cool reds tend to be a bit muted. It's funny about that, those two brands. Fortunately, Mount Vision and Gallery Mungyo Hand Rolled have a similar texture to the Unisons.

I group my pastels into Semi-Hard, Medium-Soft, Hand-Rolled (Unison and its like), Super-Soft (Ludwig, Schminke etc.) and miscellaneous (Girault, anything odd like that). Also pastel pencils and Pan Pastels. I'm too used to thinking of my pastels as a range or spectrum of textures as much as color to pick sole favorites.

Unison is a bit better for all-around, don't rely on other textures with it, but so are the other Hand Rolled. The light weight and easy laydown makes them function softer than they are. Girault are just weird, very dense and almost like hard pastels but flow like much softer than they are.

Ludwigs are like heavy whipping cream, rich and intense.

Unisons are like whipped cream, light and fluffy and delicate, great richness in a much less heavy way.

Shallbe
12-20-2017, 05:09 PM
So Rob,

You like the Mungyo Gallery HandMade pastels? I have 4 of them...they were the only really soft pastels available at the local Jerry's, and I was desperate for a couple of really dark greens and some bright blues. I was worried that they wouldn't be nice...but I like them!

Since they are so much cheaper than other brands, I was considering purchasing a larger selection of them, but I've heard mixed reviews, and am concerned about lightfastness.

Do you have any experience with the lightfastness of them? Is the texture pretty consistent among all the colors?

Shallbe
(who has been absent because there was such a lull in conversation here, but popped back in today to look for info on a certain subject. Hi everyone!:wave: )

AnnaLisa
12-20-2017, 05:31 PM
Thank you all for your answers.
Thanks Robert for writing such a long and insight answer!!

I also start with harder pastels and then go over with medium soft.
The thing is that the Terry:s are quite pricy and they only sell sets here. I want to buy the V100 but if I only shall buy open stock from Terry....with all the extra costs we pay here, maybe one stick would cost as much as Henri Roche:lol:

So I will buy one Terry L set later. The unisons have some great greens I admit.
Ok, so its best to have some pastels from both.
I asked because I was wondering if the price of Terry is worth it when there is Unison. But to pic the best from them both is the best I guess. Only buy the ones you really need from Terry that Unison don't have.

Sometimes there are sales on Unison. But I have never seen that on Terrys here.
Maybe its because they are popular.

I have never used the Mungyo pastels, so Shallbe it would be interesting to know which other brand it is closest to.

robertsloan2
12-27-2017, 07:18 AM
Mungyo Hand Rolled are nice. I haven't tested any of them for lightfastness due to circumstances (no sunny window I could tape test sheets to). But by texture they are similar to Unison.

Terry Ludwig Violets set includes V100 and is worth it, beautiful violets. A hue that is mysteriously short on values in many brands anyway, it's hard to find good violets and red-violets in most assortments. There will be substantially more variation in oranges than in violets, for example. Beats me for why, since violet is one of my go-to colors.

Terry Ludwigs are very pigment rich, that's the main reason for the price as far as I can tell. That and it's a quite small shop selling hand made product. Other companies might have economy of scale going for sourcing pigments.

But aside from that, they're what they are. I think that Terry's not selling open stock except on his own site was part of some of the deals selling through chains. It's odd. He may have done that to keep something exclusive to his own business. When shipping internationally, yeah, that's where ordering just one stick would be crazy and put it in the range of a Henri Roche.

I would look at colors not found in other brands for what sets though. Another good option might be the Vibrants set along with the small Violets one. Vibrants seem to have a lot of very strong reds and pinks, cool reds and pinks. This covers a gap in Unison's range. Unison cool reds and pinks tend to be a bit muted compared to warm reds and pinks. Terry Ludwig's greens are famous for being so varied, for there being 90 of them. I don't like them because they are muted and don't have a vibrant range among them. Each their own, but I like to have pure spectrum hues available along with interesting muted combinations. Whether I'm scumbling them over something else to knock it back or using it for accents, I like having pure color at hand.

Unison has beautiful bright greens. So I balance them with each other, or rather use Sennelier bright greens to balance Ludwig because they're in that softness category.

DITTE3
12-28-2017, 05:48 AM
I prefer Ludwig because of the texture and the shape. It's more convenient for my style. I also have a lot of Unison and like that as well but it is dependent on what I paint. I am thinking about
buying Mount Vision instead of Unison because the sticks are bigger and for me they are not much different feelwise. It's good to buy both to see would you prefer. It can be very personal.
I agree completely with Robert about the Greens and colors of Terry L. and Unison

LuckyLaura
02-10-2018, 09:29 AM
I have a lot of Unison, Mungyo, and Sennelier, but I still purchased a 60 set of darks because they were full of colours I was having trouble finding even after buying lots of open stock in other brands (pretty much all the brands you can get here). I wouldn't buy Terry Ludwigs that are in similar colour ranges to other brands because they are just way too expensive, and smaller, especially here in the UK. But for the special colours, I think they are worth it

weidox
05-25-2018, 11:53 AM
I just got info from Terry Ludwig on pigments used in their pastels - still waiting for confirmation whether the list is really that short, but most likely it is. If confirmed, that would explain the greens from Terry Ludwig - they're not using any of green or orange pigments, meaning they would be making them by mixing yellows+blues for greens, and yellows+reds from oranges, subsequently meaning that all of their greens and oranges are muted. For reds, yellows and blues they're using more or less the best pigments (chromatic and muted ones). About violets, just from pigments it is not clear how much high chroma violets they may have as PV19 different hues are different in chromaticity, and PV23 is muted.

JPQ
05-27-2018, 07:56 AM
I just got info from Terry Ludwig on pigments used in their pastels - still waiting for confirmation whether the list is really that short, but most likely it is. If confirmed, that would explain the greens from Terry Ludwig - they're not using any of green or orange pigments, meaning they would be making them by mixing yellows+blues for greens, and yellows+reds from oranges, subsequently meaning that all of their greens and oranges are muted. For reds, yellows and blues they're using more or less the best pigments (chromatic and muted ones). About violets, just from pigments it is not clear how much high chroma violets they may have as PV19 different hues are different in chromaticity, and PV23 is muted.

Mow i also want see this pigment list.