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TheJoy
07-22-2017, 07:10 AM
Hey friends, first off I would like to thank everyone for the acceptance on this forum. Everyone has been so nice, and for someone just learning how to express their artistic side that is important. Something I want to get into lately is wood carving, like banisters and table legs. I loved working on the lathe when I was younger and I love doing little work with my hands so I figure this would be a great outlet. There are probably tons of different tools I can get to do this with, but I am looking for hand tools only. I want to do with no power. If there are any really good beginner sets of hand wood tools that someone could recommend me that would be amazing, or what the basic tools that I need to look at getting would be just as great. Thanks in advance everyone, I am sure you all will know what to say.

SparrowHawk7
07-22-2017, 09:13 AM
I haven't got a lathe so I have no experience with those tools. However I have done some carving - caricatures and that sort of thing and I also have done Federalist inlay on legs and aprons. Those tools are different for the most part, but one thing you definitely need is a set of gouges. The size will depend on the scale you wish to use so I can't really say much there either. Pfeil are excellent - Swiss made. Perhaps a bit costly but with tools you get what you pay for within reason so a few dollars extra spent there will be worth it in the long run IMO. Here's a page at Woodcraft that offers some sets and some individual tools. There are many other outlets for such tools so a bit of research would be wise but here is a place to start. https://www.woodcraft.com/categories/carving-tools I get most of my hand tools from Lie Neilsen which are always of the highest quality I believe .. but you do pay for that. There is, however, a vast difference between a low grade plane and one of high quality. If you use it enough, the better quality is worth every penny. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/

kauila
07-22-2017, 11:08 PM
It depends on what sort of table legs or banisters you are making. There are some woodworkers who can do amazing work using what seems to be the "crudest" of tools. Several styles of spoke shaves are great for custom work once you get the feel for using them correctly. I have found a good drawknife to be very efficient and even quite accurate if it is sharp and used correctly. A good block plane is a necessity for even carpenters. Ken is right about quality tools, but even a much cheaper (lesser quality) tool can often do a decent job if you learn how to sharpen and tune the blade well.

TheJoy
07-24-2017, 09:04 AM
I haven't got a lathe so I have no experience with those tools. However I have done some carving - caricatures and that sort of thing and I also have done Federalist inlay on legs and aprons. Those tools are different for the most part, but one thing you definitely need is a set of gouges. The size will depend on the scale you wish to use so I can't really say much there either. Pfeil are excellent - Swiss made. Perhaps a bit costly but with tools you get what you pay for within reason so a few dollars extra spent there will be worth it in the long run IMO. Here's a page at Woodcraft that offers some sets and some individual tools. There are many other outlets for such tools so a bit of research would be wise but here is a place to start. https://www.woodcraft.com/categories/carving-tools I get most of my hand tools from Lie Neilsen which are always of the highest quality I believe .. but you do pay for that. There is, however, a vast difference between a low grade plane and one of high quality. If you use it enough, the better quality is worth every penny. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/

Cool, thanks for the advice Ken. I will check that website out and then do some more research to find out what kind of tools I am really looking for, and what ones I need to spend the big bucks on.

TheJoy
07-25-2017, 06:13 AM
Hey friends, first off I would like to thank everyone for the acceptance on this forum. Everyone has been so nice, and for someone just learning how to express their artistic side that is important. Something I want to get into lately is wood carving, like banisters and table legs. I loved working on the lathe when I was younger and I love doing little work with my hands so I figure this would be a great outlet. There are probably tons of different tools I can get to do this with, but I am looking for hand tools only. I want to do with no power. If there are any really good beginner sets of hand wood tools (http://www.for-sale.co.uk/wood-tools-for-sale) that someone could recommend me that would be amazing, or what the basic tools that I need to look at getting would be just as great. Thanks in advance everyone, I am sure you all will know what to say.

I took a look at the links I was sent, and I also spent the afternoon talking with an old feller I met at a coffee shop around home that did a lot of traditional wood carving with hand tools. We chatted for a while about what I want to do and what I need to do it properly, then he showed me some tools that his buddy was selling that seemed to be a great pick. He even went and helped me pick out the stuff I would need versus the stuff that would sit for years so that I wasn't spending too much :D

SparrowHawk7
07-25-2017, 07:21 AM
I took a look at the links I was sent, and I also spent the afternoon talking with an old feller I met at a coffee shop around home that did a lot of traditional wood carving with hand tools. We chatted for a while about what I want to do and what I need to do it properly, then he showed me some tools that his buddy was selling that seemed to be a great pick. He even went and helped me pick out the stuff I would need versus the stuff that would sit for years so that I wasn't spending too much :D
You are very fortunate. That's the best way to avoid mistakes in purchasing. We've all spent money on a lovely tool that pretty much ends up sitting. Sometimes there isn't much of a choice as in a certain gouge that I needed for a particular job - for me it was doing bell flower inlays on a table leg. I needed a particular curve so I wound up buying several gouges that were close (there is no woodworking store within 100 miles of me so I couldn't go measure). So now I have those gouges and other beautiful hand tools that are just waiting for the right moment to be used .. and may go on waiting for years. Oh well ... I look at hand tools like clamps - you can never have too many. And if I don't use them, I don't have to sharpen them. :lol:

Which reminds me ... don't forget that a sharp tool is not only more efficient but it's safer. Figure out how you want to do your sharpening (waterstones, Arkansas, diamond or machine) and plan to add whatever sharpening tools you will need as well. Some honed tools will hold an edge reasonably well while others will get dull quickly - but they all need sharpening eventually. I'll also mention that I find sharpening relaxing. I've been known to spend an afternoon sharpening already razor sharp irons and chisels just because I enjoy it. (I'm an artist .. I'm supposed to be eccentric).