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View Full Version : "K5054"... not just another Spitfire


Kassal
05-29-2017, 12:59 PM
The prototype 'Spitfire' being test flown at Eastleigh in 1936; this painting was published as a greetings card by 'Polytint Cards' many years ago



http://i.imgur.com/N9m6hBC.jpg acrylic on 12X16 inch panel

NeilF92
05-29-2017, 03:18 PM
Evocative and very nice .

Kassal
05-29-2017, 03:46 PM
Thanks, Neil. Just to show how maddening it can be trying to get a satisfactory photo of a painting, compare the above to this shot I took of the same painting some while ago:

http://i.imgur.com/fJOSKFw.jpg

Trumper
05-30-2017, 05:56 AM
It looks a lot more fearsome than the later early production models.A lovely sense of speed again :)

Kassal
05-30-2017, 11:57 AM
They did later convert K5054 to an active fighter configuration but it was written off in a crash the day after war was declared. As I recall they plonked a wooden aerial mast on the top, removed the wheel-covers, and installed exhaust manifolds and a tailwheel. Oh, and six Browning MG's of course. She retained the characteristic 'flat topped' canopy (the 'blown' canopy hood came on later Mk1s in service).

More interesting to me is the colour. I did extensive research into this for the painting and the plastic models which preceded it; most (all?) other paintings of K5054 at this time show a light-blue aircraft (and that's how she was described by at least one contemporary witness). But the paint used was "Supermarine Seaplane Grey", which was actually more of a greenish colour. I believe that local colour from the sky in the hot Summer of 1936 was picked up in the highly polished surface and made it look, well, blue! It's arguable then that I should've painted it to look blue (like everybody else). That's a poser, isn't it?

Ianrevealed
06-11-2017, 10:46 AM
They did later convert K5054 to an active fighter configuration but it was written off in a crash the day after war was declared. As I recall they plonked a wooden aerial mast on the top, removed the wheel-covers, and installed exhaust manifolds and a tailwheel. Oh, and six Browning MG's of course. She retained the characteristic 'flat topped' canopy (the 'blown' canopy hood came on later Mk1s in service).

More interesting to me is the colour. I did extensive research into this for the painting and the plastic models which preceded it; most (all?) other paintings of K5054 at this time show a light-blue aircraft (and that's how she was described by at least one contemporary witness). But the paint used was "Supermarine Seaplane Grey", which was actually more of a greenish colour. I believe that local colour from the sky in the hot Summer of 1936 was picked up in the highly polished surface and made it look, well, blue! It's arguable then that I should've painted it to look blue (like everybody else). That's a poser, isn't it?

Your point about the colour is interesting. I spend quite some time baffled that the local Shackleton looked blue but when I crept up underneath it to get a good feel for the colour it was an unequivocal grey! By then I had a blue and white (SA Air Force) aircraft on the canvas which looked right!

Kassal
06-11-2017, 05:36 PM
Well I suppose my last comment indicates that I'm inclined to believe that the model should look the colour that the real thing 'looks', if you get my meaning, so you're probably right to have finished your Shackleton the way you did.

I don't know whether the interesting subject of "scale colour" has ever come up in this forum (given that it's first and foremost a forum for painters and not modelmakers)? It does have some bearing on our art, I feel, because so many factors influence the way a colour looks on an aircraft, including its size.