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LisaOlivarez
04-17-2017, 03:35 PM
I just ordered a large roll of Uart paper and plan to mount it to matboard by using gel medium. I've done it before with Wallis paper by applying the gel medium on both the paper and board, letting it dry then using an iron to heat bond the two surfaces.

Has anyone ever done this in a large format? I'm going large, 30x40. :wave:

contumacious
04-17-2017, 08:33 PM
I would recommend Beva 371 film or liquid or a similar product for something that big. It is a heat activated adhesive.

Check out this thread on WC.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1424808

Donna T
04-18-2017, 09:21 AM
I use matte medium to mount pieces of UArt to museum board backings. So far I've had pretty good luck. I read about the technique in a Maggie Price book. With her method you apply matte medium to the board only and you leave a little border around the outside which you keep clean. After you lay your paper down on the sticky surface you cover it with a piece of scrap paper and rub smoothly from the inside to the outside. Then you weigh it all down to let it dry. After it's dry you apply medium to the back side too to prevent warping. I usually use gesso for that step. I've never tried to use heat to bond the surfaces. What kind of gel medium do you use? Do you have to weigh it down while it dries? I'm guessing you cover the paper and use the iron on the highest heat? As you can tell, I'm interested! :)

LisaOlivarez
04-18-2017, 10:22 AM
Thanks for the link to the adhesive thread. The Beva sheets sound a little pricey for me at this point, but I will keep it in mind for future.

Donna, I've used both Utrecht gloss gel medium and Liquitex gloss medium. It works well, you just have to be super careful not to get any on the surface of the paper.

I'll let you know how the large sheets work with this technique, the roll of Uart isn't here yet.

contumacious
04-18-2017, 12:26 PM
..... I've never tried to use heat to bond the surfaces. What kind of gel medium do you use? Do you have to weigh it down while it dries? I'm guessing you cover the paper and use the iron on the highest heat? As you can tell, I'm interested! :)

Here is a copy and paste of my post referenced above. There is a learning curve for sure, but after having used this process I won't be using water based permanent adhesives to glue down paper again if I can avoid it. Ideally you would want a heated dry mount press. I bought one used for $250 and it paid for itself in less than a month vs buying ready-made panels since I use it to make my own watercolor, canvas and pastel panels. It can be done with a regular iron. You will want some fabric between the iron and the paper to protect it.

Several available adhesives including the Beva 371 are reversible which is not the case with most acrylic glues / mediums.

-------------------------------------------------------------pasted info below

If you have access to a heated dry mount press you can use various films that do not have a tissue carrier in them to mount a sheet that is larger than the dry mount film. They are pure adhesive and any overlapping of film will level out in the press. Beva 371 is one example that is also one of the more popular ones out there. Versamount is another. Some people have been successful using a regular home iron to mount surfaces with Beva 371 film, Lamin-All and others.

I started out trying spray mounting materials and brushed on liquids but was not happy with the results so I bought a used dry mount press. Had I tried the liquid brush on / heat activated adhesives I may have forgone the press purchase but I am glad I have it. Over the last few years I have had great success mounting pastel and watercolor papers, canvas and other surfaces to sealed hardboard and aluminum composite panels (Dibond) with heat activated dry mount films. I prefer aluminum composite to any available support surfaces but it costs more than hardboard and is heavier than Gatorboard.

http://www.conservationsupportsystem...beva-adhesives (http://www.conservationsupportsystems.com/product/subcategory/beva-adhesives)

Beva 371 film comes in 27" and 54" wide rolls.

Beva 371 solution is a liquid version of the film. As I recall, once it is dry it is essentially the same thing as the Beva 371 film. Another similar product is Lamin-All. It definitely won't be as easy as the film with a press but the link labeled Lamin-All makes it look fairly easy.

EZMount
http://www.artgrafix.net/store/product313.html

Polymount
http://www.artgrafix.net/store/product314.html

Versamount
http://www.printmount.com/tissue.htm (http://www.printmount.com/tissue.htm)

Some videos below mostly mounting linen but the process is the same for pastel papers.

Lamin-All mounting canvas to MDF
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2ExXyevSxo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N07zNllvg6o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=be5gkpco1kg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzY1Yh4Y-PE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frTtf6kdAks (Beva Gel)

contumacious
04-18-2017, 01:17 PM
Thanks for the link to the adhesive thread. The Beva sheets sound a little pricey for me at this point, but I will keep it in mind for future.

Unless you have a dry mount press you might prefer the liquid versions. The Beva gel costs about the same as various acrylic gels. $25 for a quart of Beva vs Liquitex Gel from DickBlick.com at $22, GAC 100 is $27 and change. The advantages are well worth the $3 extra for a quart for me.

Drytac - Lamin-All is billed as a permanent adhesive that works with heat or the same way as acrylic gel / GAC 1000 but with the ability to even out any bumps with an iron after mounting. It is $25 a quart. A better option in my view than any acrylic gel or medium since you can heat mount it. I have not used it yet but plan to try some.

----------------------

Advantages of a heat activated adhesive:
Less chance of forming bubbles since you are not working with a liquid when heat mounting the sheet.
Removable for conservation purposes (Beva and some others)
Easier to get it perfectly flat since it melts to an even layer
Re-heatable - if you end up with a lump under the paper, just iron it out flat. Try doing that with GAC 100 or Acrylic Gel medium.
Once mounted it is ready to paint on as soon as it cools which takes 5 minutes or so.
Less danger of getting it on the front of the surface since you apply to the back of both surfaces separately first and let it dry then heat mount. You aren't squishing a liquid out on the edges when you are actually mounting the surface on the panel.

LisaOlivarez
04-18-2017, 03:35 PM
Thank you, contumacious, where do you purchase the sheets, on the website you linked to? From what I can see, a 54 inch x 20 foot roll is $210. That's what I meant by pricy, it's more than the roll of Uart I ordered.

Have you tried the liquid? I really like the idea of the liquid solution!

I have used heat to remove a large oil painting from a cradled panel made from birch.

Donna, I'm sorry, I missed a couple of your questions.

1. No, you don't have to weigh down the pieces. You coat both surfaces, wait until they dry, put them glue side together and iron.

2. I don't think I used highest heat. You might experiment a little on small scraps like I did.

I unfortunately don't have a nifty heat press, so will let you know how my experiment on a large scale with Uart an iron and matboard works.

contumacious
04-18-2017, 06:53 PM
Thank you, contumacious, where do you purchase the sheets, on the website you linked to? From what I can see, a 54 inch x 20 foot roll is $210. That's what I meant by pricy, it's more than the roll of Uart I ordered.

Have you tried the liquid? I really like the idea of the liquid solution!


Beva and the two mentioned below are very resistant to ethyl and methyl alcohol, so a mounted sheet should be safe for sloppy underpainting. I was told by the maker that IPA might slightly soften Beva with a long period of saturation.

I have not used the Beva Gel or film or the Lamin-All, only Versamount and Polymount. I recommended the Beva film as it is reportedly the easiest to work with using a regular iron.

I do plan on trying the Beva Gel and the Lamin-All eventually. I may not get the Beva film as I have several years worth of Polymount and Versamount that came with my press. I would love to find a sample pack that has a couple of small sheets of every brand out there to try.....

Here are some other sources for Beva.

http://www.artistsupplysource.com (http://www.artistsupplysource.com/product/525015/natural-pigments-beva-371-film-27-roll/?origin=google_product_ads&gclid=CMvAj83_rtMCFYSKswodSn4KJQ)

http://www.museumservicescorporation.com/scat/be.html

Gaylord (http://www.gaylord.com/Preservation/Conservation-Supplies/Wrapping%2C-Lining-%26-Support-Materials/Beva%26%23174%3B-2-5-mil-371-Film-%28Roll%29/p/HYB09112)

https://www.universityproducts.com/beva-371-film.html

tuzigoot
04-22-2017, 12:40 AM
"Over the last few years I have had great success mounting pastel and watercolor papers, canvas and other surfaces to sealed hardboard and aluminum composite panels (Dibond) with heat activated dry mount films. I prefer aluminum composite to any available support surfaces but it costs more than hardboard and is heavier than Gatorboard."


When you seal the hardboard, do you use a gesso? What other surfaces would work for this process - I would love to find something lighter weight than Masonite, which gets pretty heavy when you use large pieces.
Thanks! Definitely a useful thread!

contumacious
04-22-2017, 11:24 PM
"Over the last few years I have had great success mounting pastel and watercolor papers, canvas and other surfaces to sealed hardboard and aluminum composite panels (Dibond) with heat activated dry mount films. I prefer aluminum composite to any available support surfaces but it costs more than hardboard and is heavier than Gatorboard."


When you seal the hardboard, do you use a gesso? What other surfaces would work for this process - I would love to find something lighter weight than Masonite, which gets pretty heavy when you use large pieces.
Thanks! Definitely a useful thread!

The term tempered hardboard when used by me = tempered "Masonite". I usually seal both sides of the hardboard with either PVA, some cheap acrylic gesso or some kind of commercial primer / sealer to lock out moisture and prevent any unwanted toning of the surface. It does get heavy compared to mat board or something like that, particularly with the 1/4". I am using it less and less since finding the M-Panel Dibond like aluminum composites. I don't ever use the Masonite for mounting watercolor papers anymore, but will sometimes for mounting pastels and for oils 9x12 or smaller. The aluminum stays flatter than the Masonite with the larger pieces which makes framing a snap.

bluepen61
04-24-2017, 10:26 AM
I just purchased some Lamin-all and have had some difficulty in locating some MDF board. In my garage, I found some 1/4" plywood I have had for a couple of years. (It wasn't warped.)

I cut is to size, applied the Lamin-all, let dry to a clear, then ironed on the Uart paper with an iron and cotton sack cloth. That was easy!

Now I need to paint on it! I have read that painting on mounted paper is much different.

contumacious
04-24-2017, 06:10 PM
I just purchased some Lamin-all and have had some difficulty in locating some MDF board. In my garage, I found some 1/4" plywood I have had for a couple of years. (It wasn't warped.)

I cut is to size, applied the Lamin-all, let dry to a clear, then ironed on the Uart paper with an iron and cotton sack cloth. That was easy!

Now I need to paint on it! I have read that painting on mounted paper is much different.

Probably a good thing you couldn't find any MDF. I strongly dislike it for mounting anything on. Too fragile and far too absorbent. I would take 1/4" plywood over MDF any day. It is a good idea to seal both sides and all the edges of the plywood before you attach your paper but if it is a quality piece of plywood, which it sounds like it is since it hasn't warped for a couple of years, as long as you don't get it wet or hang it in a humid environment, you should be fine.

I don't find it any different than painting on a sheet of paper taped to a rigid support. If you are used to painting on a softer support like mat board or foam core, then it could have a different feel to it.

bnoonan
04-25-2017, 12:15 PM
Thank you for this excellent thread.

Question: Has anyone mounted pastel mat? I'm wondering what the heat and pressure would do to the paper's texture.

Barb