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vegaskip
04-10-2017, 04:38 AM
The 'Mona' disaster
The North Carr lightship broke adrift from her moorings in a gale on 8 December 1959 and all eight crew members of the Broughty Ferry lifeboat died trying to rescue her.[3] The crew of the lightship managed to set anchor off Kingsbarns and were taken off by helicopter the next day but the ship was not taken under tow until 11 December.[2] The lightship was replaced by a lighted buoy in 1975, at the same time as a lighthouse was built at Fife Ness on the mainland.[2] The lightship was saved from the scrapyard in 2010 and funds are being sought by the Taymara charity to restore her as an exhibition space on the Dundee waterfront.[3]
This was far too small for this type of painting ( less tha A4 ) should have been one of the wide canvases I now prefer.
Jim
846127

NeilF92
04-10-2017, 05:20 AM
Can still remember the noise the Sycamore made - deep throaty grumble . Tragic event the Broughty Ferry lifeboat disaster -dammed shame .

shadwell
04-10-2017, 08:36 PM
think there is one sycamore still airworthy and flown someone posted photos the other day on an aviation photography site it is white with dark blue lining and british markings

Chas McHugh
04-11-2017, 03:21 AM
The 'airworthy' one is Austrian based, operated these days by Red Bull.
It is an ex RAF 32 Sqn VIP example and remains in that colour scheme.

Sycamores have wooden blades that have been warped by craftsmen. As you can perhaps imagine, they do not last forever and getting new replacements (if available at all) is an expensive business.

This painting has much atmosphere to it, and has inspired me into further reading about the events depicted. Jim - Did you make assumptions about the weather or are there references that provided you with info?

Technically there is an important inaccuracy, but nothing that a casual observer would note. The ship was at anchor and therefore I make the assumption that the vessel would sit downwind of the anchor point due to weather cocking. That being the case, the helicopter would sit on the same axis as the vessel. Sycamores did not have crewmen in the cabin and on the wire (The Captain operated the winch) and therefore he would have at most moved laterally left away from the vessel during the winching process. Logic says that vessel and helicopter would share compass heading +- not very much.

It would make a good subject for an oil painting!!!!!
There is a Pathe film inclusive of the North Carr lightship, but no indication of the when or where. (& no sound/commentary)

shadwell
04-11-2017, 04:34 AM
Sycamores have wooden blades that have been warped by craftsmen. As you can perhaps imagine, they do not last forever and getting new replacements (if available at all) is an expensive business.

which begs the question ,, could they be made out of modern composite materials ?? and if so could performance improve ??

Trumper
04-11-2017, 04:41 AM
Sycamores have wooden blades that have been warped by craftsmen. As you can perhaps imagine, they do not last forever and getting new replacements (if available at all) is an expensive business.

which begs the question ,, could they be made out of modern composite materials ?? and if so could performance improve ??

That would possibly also come down to the CAA approval and also any back up from manufacturers.

vegaskip
04-11-2017, 05:32 AM
Chas it was a spur of the moment painting, I knew the story well, only research was photos of the ship and a/c ( no idea of Mark, numbers or anything ) the weather is just typical dull coast of Fife after storm. The sea is far too blue, should have been yellowy green as it is quite near the shore. A/C is moving forward and turning towards the shore. The other one is hovering into wind.
The sea in this area is very treacherous and confused, right at the mouth of the Tay with sandbanks stretching well out to sea.
I'd really like to see a version done by you.
Jim

Chas McHugh
04-11-2017, 06:32 AM
Slightly of(ish) topic.

The RAF Puma fleet were delivered with metal blades in 1971.
In about 1981 the fleet was upgrade to composite fibre blades with a honeycomb foam filling - a wider chord - and upgraded performance. Able to carry an additional 300 Kgs - 500 in an emergency or specially authorised.
This being with the same engines and transmission.

The metal blades required gas for rigidity - if you see small bubbles at the root of a helicopter blade (Wessex - Whirlwind for sure) this is a gas pressure indicator. Clearly bullets through a blade has an undesirable effect whereas with the honeycomb filled composite blades of the Puma, we didn't care too much about small arms fire.

I do not know who owns the Sycamore release to service these days but it is probably Westland's or whichever Italian name they call themselves this week. I would think that 'plastic' blades would be approved for the sole surviving Sycamore, should the need arise.