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tgault
07-24-2000, 03:56 PM
Hi all,
I'm just starting my first commissioned watercolor painting. Wouldn't you know it includes an effect I've never tried before. How did I get myself into this?! Does anyone have advice on techniques for depicting a foggy morning sunrise with shafts of light streaming through tree branches? Needs to be very soft focus, so I'm figuring lots of wet-in-wet and probably pouring colors across the paper. But I don't think this alone is going to give me what I want.
Thanks,
Tim

oleCC
07-24-2000, 09:34 PM
Are you working from a reference? If so, can you post it here? There are several ways to create the look of fog, but would need to see what you are trying for I think. My favorite way to do it is to "scrumble" with a clean damp brush (that has a bit of resistance to it) -- and blot with tissue - and you might be able to "lift" the sun rays in the same manner. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Carol

[This message has been edited by oleCC (edited July 24, 2000).]

Rod
07-25-2000, 04:47 AM
I too use the damp and lift method with tissue. You can also use lost and found technique, damp one part of the area you are going to paint then paint into the damp spot, paint disperses object lost then out the damp area onto dry paper again, object is found.
Rod


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Rodzart from New Zealand (http://www.artistnation.com/members/paris/rodzart/)

oleCC
07-25-2000, 08:20 AM
Hi Rod... can you describe that "lost and found" technique again for me? I am confused and it sounds interesting. Is that for changing a mistake - or ??? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Carol

oleCC
07-25-2000, 06:08 PM
What a neat reference .. thanks for showing it here. I would probably not use the method I described earlier, on this one. It looks to me as though you can achieve that soft foggy look just working wet on wet, but not soaky wet. Honestly, I really like the colors as shown - soft, etc. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Carol

tgault
07-26-2000, 12:32 AM
Thanks Carol and Rod, for your help. Here's the reference photo taken this past Spring in beautiful Glencoe, Oregon. The effect is pretty subtle here. I intend to make it much stronger in the painting. I'm also going to be very non-literal with the colors and use some bright blues, greens, yellows, etc.


<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/foggy-am.jpg" border=0>

[This message has been edited by tgault (edited July 25, 2000).]

susieshort
07-26-2000, 01:14 AM
Hi Tim,
As Carol said great photo! I took the liberty to lighten it a little so I could see the shadows/sunrays you refered to...I'd suggest working wet-in-wet painting a layer at a time...moving from the background to the foreground. Select pigments (and paper)that are stable enough to stand up to several steps of re-wetting. Allow for complete drying between the layers. In the layer where the rays are apply it as if they were not there and as it gets to a damp dry state, where it has lost its sheen, but you know its still damp, take a tissue an wipe out the rays, using quick straight movements of gentle pressure. Allow to dry completely, then re-wet and paint the foreground, which is the darkest value.
You may want to practice this wipe out technique to get the hang of it...and also to help in the selection of pigments.
Good luck. I hope you will keep us posted on how it's going.
Susie

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SUSIE SHORT
www.susieshort.com

tgault
07-26-2000, 10:05 AM
Carol,
Thanks! The painting is for postcards to be handed out at the Race For The Cure in Seattle this Sept., so I really want the colors to be uplifting. I'm afraid the lifeless trees with the muted colors from the original will be too ominous, but I do like them. I'll probably do another painting for myself from the same image later that is more true to the photo.

Susie,
Thanks much for the advice. Beautiful work shown on your web site, by the way!

Tim

msue
07-27-2000, 10:46 PM
I saw a Tom Lynch video where he used a spray bottle set on fine stream to "spray" the rays from the sun. He painted in the background then with the paper tilted sprayed a "ray" that pushed the paint away and left the streaks of light. It was really cool. You might try that method.

tgault
07-28-2000, 01:17 PM
Thanks Marca Sue for the technique advice. I'm going to have to try both your recommendation and Susie's as a test and see which I like best. Or maybe a combination of both would work...
Tim

Rod
08-01-2000, 04:23 AM
Would take a bit of experimenting,
if left too long and original wash had started to dry you would get run backs and cauliflower patterns would be produced,
Rod.


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Rodzart from New Zealand (http://www.artistnation.com/members/paris/rodzart/)

tgault
08-01-2000, 03:20 PM
Right, but I sometimes like the effects of blooms if they fit into the rest of the painting and don't look like mistakes. I'll let you know how this works out for me. My first attempt with layering and wiping out failed, as the colors lost their luminosity after the third layer. I've had to start over. Lost a whole week of work... ARGH!