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gingerblue
02-13-2017, 07:27 PM
I'm an experienced artist in watercolor and acrylic and other water-based mediums and have suddenly become intrigued with the idea of oil pastels.

I want them more to paint and blend with than to draw and sketch with- I do a lot of abstract work with big shapes that have multiple colors inside them (lots of blending). I do lots of glazing in my water-based work and love granulating watercolors, but I know that glazing is not as much as an option with some oil pastels. So my focus is to really get some beautiful color blends and gradients. And maybe work with some cold wax and do some faux encaustic things (I'm not interested in going full encaustic or oil painting right now- I just want to dip my toes in that style.)

I'm tempted to get the Senneliers, simply because I have their entire range of watercolors and have been very pleased with the quality of their products and their color range. I have done research and it looks like they are the softest and "paint"iest (not a word, but not sure how else to describe it.). From what I have researched, it sounds like the Hobeins and Caran D'Aches are a big firmer and more suited to sketching and plein air/still life. But I've read some great things about the C'aran Dache and Holbeins, as well- and was wondering if they can be "painted" with as easily as the Senneliers when used with mineral spirits/turpentine/resin gels.

Like I said, I just kind of want to blend the heck out of colors and see what happens.

Any advice/insight would be much appreciated.

Thank you! :)

tuscanny
02-13-2017, 11:55 PM
Hi Gingerblue! Welcome to WetCanvas and to the oil pastel forum.
Senneliers is the top of the range. Using any brand you might even think of blending with solvents to give it a wc or oils look. Experiment and have fun.

gingerblue
02-14-2017, 12:54 AM
Hi Gingerblue! Welcome to WetCanvas and to the oil pastel forum.
Senneliers is the top of the range. Using any brand you might even think of blending with solvents to give it a wc or oils look. Experiment and have fun.


Thanks for the welcome! I have a box of Gallery Myungo (I think that's what it is) that I picked up a few years ago from Jerry's on a lark to see how they might work with acrylic, so maybe I'll mess with those a bit before I commit to a large purchase. I just know from experience that with certain art supplies, using artist-quality vs. non-artist quality can be like using completely different mediums. Every time I have skimped on an art supply purchase, I regret it and wind up getting the better stuff eventually after months of frustration.

The issue is I have Full Set Syndrome so forcing myself to order just a few oil pastels from different brands is like picking just ONE color to say is my favorite.

I'm eager to really explore the forum more and see what others have created. :)

Ratchet
02-14-2017, 12:15 PM
JMHO
Oil Pastels are extremely personal preference. I would recommend buying open stock selection of 3 to 6 Senneliers, Holbein and Caran D'Ache to see how you like the feel.
Most Artist Oil Pastels are good quality in terms of range of colors, colorfastness.
However the "feel" of the Oil Pastel differs, is hard to describe and is entirely personal. Considering the cost, I would try each brand open stock to see which hard/soft suited my particular style

gingerblue
02-17-2017, 11:27 AM
JMHO
Oil Pastels are extremely personal preference. I would recommend buying open stock selection of 3 to 6 Senneliers, Holbein and Caran D'Ache to see how you like the feel.
Most Artist Oil Pastels are good quality in terms of range of colors, colorfastness.
However the "feel" of the Oil Pastel differs, is hard to describe and is entirely personal. Considering the cost, I would try each brand open stock to see which hard/soft suited my particular style

Thank you for the insight- I guess they are like watercolor that way (probably even more personal preference based). I'll go ahead and order a few different brands from online and see what sparks. I'm kind of afraid I'll wind up wanting full colors ranges from ALL the brands if the texture and oiliness is really so variable from brand to brand ;) !

RainySea
07-04-2017, 11:15 AM
I agree... its very individual. Senneliers may be the top of the line, but I have a full set of both those and Holbeins that I rarely use. My go to OP is neopastels when creating art to hang/frame... and portfolio or sakura in my sketchbook.

3243
07-25-2017, 07:10 PM
I would start with a less-expensive brand of artist-quality oil pastels, like the Myungo Gallery Artist Softs (available in 72 colors for around $50-70 dollars) and perhaps a small set of, say, 24 Caran D'Ache Neopastels or 12 Senneliers to start out with. I would even suggest a set of the cheaper student-grade ones to begin experimenting with along with a small set of the better brands (Sennelier, Caran D'Ache, Holbein, Myungo Gallery Artist Soft, Art Aspirer Erengi) to give you a feel for what the medium is like and what you can do with it.

I wish you the best in your endeavors.

3243
07-25-2017, 07:12 PM
I'm kind of afraid I'll wind up wanting full colors ranges from ALL the brands if the texture and oiliness is really so variable from brand to brand ;) !

Me too.:)

I know I want all of the artist-quality brands in all of their colors. And I want them to start making a lot more colors, as is the case with soft pastels.

Hipkit
09-10-2017, 01:45 PM
I would second the choice of Artists Quality Premium Mungyo oil pastel. Ensure they're not the regular Mungyo, which is a different beast.
They are soft and creamy, and it won't break the bank to buy the full range.
Some peeps find the Senneliers too soft, like lipstick. I have a few Neopastels, they're great, but tiny.
If you want to experiment with student brands you can't beat the Pentel oil pastels, which are very inexpensive and surprisingly nice to work with.