PDA

View Full Version : Short Sunderland III freight A/C


napier
02-07-2017, 06:24 PM
This is part of a painting showing the arrival of three Short Sunderland III to NZ for the purpose of freight supplying to the Pacific during WW2. The painting is 1800x250mm

http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg579/longforgan/DSC_0015w_zps0pkhg07i.jpg (http://s1244.photobucket.com/user/longforgan/media/DSC_0015w_zps0pkhg07i.jpg.html)

RegisR
02-07-2017, 11:39 PM
Looks good so far! God, you guys have guts, just drawing straight on the canvas! I salute your bravery, as I'd be worried about remixing the colors to cover any mistakes.

napier
02-08-2017, 10:14 PM
todays update
http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg579/longforgan/DSC_0010w_zpskgudioag.jpg (http://s1244.photobucket.com/user/longforgan/media/DSC_0010w_zpskgudioag.jpg.html)

RegisR
02-09-2017, 08:25 AM
I like the tilt of the subject. It adds an action and motion element to the scene. The subtle shadow on the water surface is a nice touch too! I always had a soft spot for the amphibious aircraft, like the Mars Mariner and many others.

napier
02-10-2017, 10:24 PM
Progress on the painting. Two of the three Sunderlands now in and some background added
http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg579/longforgan/DSC_0001w_zpsuyde0ylp.jpg (http://s1244.photobucket.com/user/longforgan/media/DSC_0001w_zpsuyde0ylp.jpg.html)

RegisR
02-11-2017, 02:37 AM
Looks great, but I've gotta ask, was it normal post flight ops. to shut down all four engines on touch down? I thought, I'd see at least two engines running during taxiing to the dock or tie down. Was this a shutdown moment? Still seeing motion with the water around the keel and floats. Thoughts?

Or is this, that all three amphibs are already shut down, docked, tied up and crewless?

RegisR
02-11-2017, 02:45 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Feb-2017/1682843-Navy_600-x-400.jpg

napier
02-11-2017, 03:17 AM
All three are docked and crewless.

NeilF92
02-11-2017, 09:48 AM
Minor point RegisR - Sunderlands were pure flying boats , taking off and landing only on water with no amphibious capability .
As far as I know the only way they came up on land was towed with a pair of wheeled struts fixed to points on the side under the wings to lift the hull off the ground. As I say - a minor point - no offence intended - just for info .
The Catalina was an amphibian able to land and take off from land and sea .

Chas McHugh
02-11-2017, 06:16 PM
Not all Catalinas are amphibious. The early ones were pure flying boats also dependent upon strap-on wheels for beaching purposes. Like the Sunderland, they were towed aft first (backwards) with a small trolley arrangement under the rear of the hull. I believe the name 'Canso' refers to Catalina equiped with wheels.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Feb-2017/984204-image.jpeg
A point of interest with flying boats, is that they need rough water to get airborne. The flying boat depicted earlier in the thread is taking off and trying to 'on the step' when they are able to reduce the drag of calm water and exploit ground effect to get airborne. Calm water = very long take off run. Actually; looking at the flaps, he may be landing, but the aircraft attitude for departure would be the same in calm water.

RegisR
02-11-2017, 07:59 PM
Sir Napier, please allow me to add a thought to this. I think that this would've been an excellent painting as a basis for a story. Something the viewer looks at and plays a part in figuring out the action of the story.

Imagine if like Jim, aka Vegaskip, one of our favorites, if you would've added a launch, tender or some kind of vessel transporting the crew, either to the aircraft or away from it. For the departure from the Saunders, I imagined the full crew, but with the the Captain looking back at his airplane.

Or if they were on their way, you could see the crew arrayed with their flight bags and their gear and they're all looking at their airplane. The viewer would know that a mission preparation is going to be next, with the crew preflighting the airplane and getting it ready.

I think it gives a special satisfaction to the viewer when you bring them in to the work, this way. Just a thought and please accept this with the kindest regards, I really like your work and thanks for sharing this.

NeilF92
02-12-2017, 05:57 PM
Cheers Chas - - I learn something every day!


Not all Catalinas are amphibious. The early ones were pure flying boats also dependent upon strap-on wheels for beaching purposes. Like the Sunderland, they were towed aft first (backwards) with a small trolley arrangement under the rear of the hull. I believe the name 'Canso' refers to Catalina equiped with wheels.

A point of interest with flying boats, is that they need rough water to get airborne. The flying boat depicted earlier in the thread is taking off and trying to 'on the step' when they are able to reduce the drag of calm water and exploit ground effect to get airborne. Calm water = very long take off run. Actually; looking at the flaps, he may be landing, but the aircraft attitude for departure would be the same in calm water.

napier
02-12-2017, 11:03 PM
3 of the 4 Sunderlands to New Zealand Mechanics Bay Nth Hd background 1944
http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg579/longforgan/combindw_zpsyazlgpwt.jpg (http://s1244.photobucket.com/user/longforgan/media/combindw_zpsyazlgpwt.jpg.html)
http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg579/longforgan/combindwbw_zpsxzxo3bxx.jpg (http://s1244.photobucket.com/user/longforgan/media/combindwbw_zpsxzxo3bxx.jpg.html)
http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg579/longforgan/DSC_0011w_zpszsyr9qet.jpg (http://s1244.photobucket.com/user/longforgan/media/DSC_0011w_zpszsyr9qet.jpg.html)
http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg579/longforgan/DSC_0013w_zpsyuikbqbx.jpg (http://s1244.photobucket.com/user/longforgan/media/DSC_0013w_zpsyuikbqbx.jpg.html)