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Shallbe
11-14-2016, 12:19 AM
I have a couple reference photos of trees or tree trunks in midst.

Any tips for painting these would be appreciated!

Shallbe

Donna T
11-14-2016, 03:34 PM
Hi Shallbe. Any chance you could post one of your reference photos? Maybe that would help give us an idea of the effect you want to paint. Off the top of my head I'd say that getting a misty look might depend on the color of the light and the amount of moisture in the air. How are the edges of the trees in your photos affected? Does the mist pool near the ground due to its heavier-than-air nature? Just a few things to consider.

Shallbe
11-14-2016, 10:28 PM
Yes, I can. It might be a day or two, since I can't post photos from my phone.

Shallbe

Shallbe
11-15-2016, 09:04 PM
Exhibit A:http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2016/1988178-Autumn_in_Emsland_Germany_.jpg

Exhibit B:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2016/1988178-Autumn_Mist_640x360.jpg

Exhibit C:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2016/1988178-P1180149_2.JPG.jpg

These are all from pmp-art.

Hopefully those are helpful in answering my question.

I also hope that some will be motivated to rate these according to difficulty, and give reasons why. Apparently I pick what I want to paint, and sometimes I have no idea how difficult a reference photo I've chosen...guess I'd better learn how to choose!:p

shallbe

Donna T
11-16-2016, 03:47 PM
These are beautiful examples of misty atmospheres! I don't know if there are specific techniques for painting mist but understanding the way that fog or mist affects the values and colors of all parts of a scene should help. In photo A, notice how quickly the values of the tree trunks are affected by successive veils of bluish mist. Is the mist warmer in color on the right where the sunlight is coming from? If that effect appeals to you it might have to be exaggerated a bit. Even those yellow leaves are affected - they are wearing a veil of mist too but the photo doesn't show it. Photo B shows that the "whites" of the birch bark are not white at all. Perhaps that could be the concept for this reference photo. Photo C is gorgeous but I would consider some sort of crop; would the large expanse of bright blue sky help or hinder the suggestion of the misty atmosphere evident near the ground? One other thing I notice is the mostly muted, nearly monochromatic color scheme in each scene. Make sure that each color you choose to add is affected by the color of the moisture in the air - whether you can see it in the photo or not. I don't know whether one photo would be more difficult than another to paint from; it all depends on how closely you choose to follow it or how much you are able to use the parts that speak to you and ignore the rest.

Ruthie57
11-16-2016, 04:25 PM
Lovely photos! And great advice from Donna. I'll add my thoughts.

The first photo bothers me a little as there is so little transition from the sharp darks of the foreground trees to the misty ones behind. That is probably the fault of the camera. If you were there you would see more details in the trunks of those foreground trees. You would also see more clearly the transition from the next nearest trees to the furthest, which would be all but hidden in the mist.
I don't have a good photo editing programme but here I have lightened the darks and darkened the lights. Still not much volume and detail to be seen in the trunks, but it could be added with artistic licence!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Nov-2016/189061-wc.jpg

Ruthie57
11-16-2016, 04:30 PM
The second photo is very misty overall with little tonal contrast. It IS a good one for an exercise in painting mist though. Just thinking if I were to do this I would choose one or three of the trees and make them step forward, darken and sharpen them to increase the depth and misty sense of those further back. I like the three together to the left hand side of the photo...but I would move them to a more interesting position within the composition.

Ruthie57
11-16-2016, 04:34 PM
I love the 3rd photo and, for me, this would be the best for practice simply because it already shows lots of depth. You can see how the mist effects the tones of the trees and bushes so you can choose your values accordingly. The near trees on the right look flat dark in the photo, so I lightened the shadows to reveal that there is some colour/tone variation there. If you do this one that dark area will certainly not be your focal area but it's nice to add a bit of variety of tone and colour to the dark areas.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Nov-2016/189061-wc2.jpg

Ruthie57
11-16-2016, 04:37 PM
As for actually painting mist well, I'm not so good at it, I tend to fiddle too much. It's like bringing in atmospheric perspective but exaggerating it even more than usual. Not only should objects be lighter in the mist, they should also be soft with no hard edges. On the other hand one can still define shapes in mist! Sigh....I guess it's all about values really.
Just try it and have fun!

Shallbe
11-16-2016, 05:48 PM
Thanks so much for all your great observations and advice!

Ruthie, I see what you mean about adding depth with some detail in the foreground. I hadn't noticed yet, but might have when I started to actually paint. I can actually see about 4 or 5 different distances as my eye travels back into that first photo...I hope I can recreate that.

Exhibit B is going to get a little bit of adjustment...the road/path is going to come a little bit more left. And...I have never tried anything like this before, but...looking at this photo makes me think of Puff the Magic Dragon! He "frolicked in the autumn mist". So...I thought of adding a bit of the back and tail of a dragon either disappearing around the bend or as if he's just stepped out of the frame on the right...am I crazy? It's misty, so he doesn't have to be perfect. Just a suggestion, maybe?

Donna T I think maybe even cropping the entire left half of that third photo wouldn't be too much. I love the pink/orange in the sky, but that could be brought into the image easily. What do you think?

Now, to find time between my many jobs to paint...

shallbe

Donna T
11-17-2016, 08:45 AM
Here's a possible crop from Ruthie's lightened version of photo #3:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Nov-2016/97763-crop2.jpg

Shallbe
11-17-2016, 08:56 AM
Hmmm...That is very pleasing, but I'm missing the sky--there's a lot of water, which slightly intimidates me because I haven't done much of that yet.

what would you say the focal point would be? Maybe...the first tree on the left? Or would it be the distant point of the sky as your eye follows the river to the end and up?

shallbe

Shallbe
01-29-2017, 08:30 PM
Ok! Finally managed to arrange all things so that I can upload my attempt at one of the mist photos. C and C welcome, of course. This is on pastelbord (I think I love it!), using pans and stick pastels.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Jan-2017/1988178-FinalEditedForestMist.jpg

shallbe

robertsloan2
02-04-2017, 08:15 PM
Ok! Finally managed to arrange all things so that I can upload my attempt at one of the mist photos. C and C welcome, of course. This is on pastelbord (I think I love it!), using pans and stick pastels.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Jan-2017/1988178-FinalEditedForestMist.jpg

shallbe

Very effective mist treatment! I like the multiple levels of recession, it feels as if the mist is very thick and the day very quiet. Lovely atmospheric scene. Tree trunks have graceful, interesting shapes and the overall effect is mystic and serene. Beautiful painting! Good combination of pan pastels and sticks!

Shallbe
02-05-2017, 09:41 AM
Thank you, Rob. Since it makes me feel as if I would like to go walking here, I consider that it might be a successful painting.

I've been working with pan and stick combination since I started almost a year ago. I believe that the contrast of marks really can give an advantage in depth and texture.

Shallbe