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View Full Version : the Skating Pond (ala BR) by Big Lew - Repost


Big_Lew
08-05-2016, 04:20 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/08-05-2016/1985141_9_Snowy_Skating_Pond_07-21-2016_.JPG


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: the Skating Pond (ala BR) by Big Lew - Repost
Year Created:
Medium: Oil
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 16
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
Repost - earlier post upload failure.

Still working on my BR-style bushes and trees. Some improvement here.

Things I don't like: Unnatural color scheme. Foreground WAY too symmetrical.

Things I do like: Finally seems like I've gotten the hang of BR-style bushes & trees.

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
Any C&C welcome. I try not to have an ego about my crude painting, I just want to get better.

Thanks in advance,

Big Lew

kin3
08-05-2016, 04:48 PM
Try some green bushes. Contrasting color. There is always some browns, greens, etc. in winter.

Something that points back to the middle of the picture.

Big_Lew
08-05-2016, 04:58 PM
Try some green bushes. Contrasting color. There is always some browns, greens, etc. in winter.

Something that points back to the middle of the picture.

Thanks, kin.

About the greens: Bob Ross advises avoiding green in his wet-on-wet, alla prima oil painting style. Here's a painting I did that ignored that advice:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Aug-2016/1985141-4_Sunset_Mountain_Snow_06-02-2016.JPG

...And I wound up with green snow under the pines on the left! Not the end of the world, but not great, either. And that's why I usually avoid greens in winter scenes.

I agree that the composition is weak. Another thing that bugs me that I neglected to mention is that the snow above the pond is so featureless. Maybe I'll revisit it and try and add more stuff to the snow. At any rate, I won't make THAT mistake again!

Thanks again for your comments,

Big Lew

La_
08-05-2016, 05:29 PM
yeah, if you want to add green it's probably best to not be working wet on wet. anything dry can certainly be reworked to change colors tho, keep that in mind.

composition, light source and color value are three of the most important things to concentrate on when creating works.

your 2nd image comp is superior here because it shows better balance (via zigzagging a bit) and depth (via soft distant trees and sharper foreground).

of your pink scene - what if ...
the pond went alllll the way across the bottom (cover up the two corner bottom bushes, they make no sense growing out of a pond anyway)
or
what if there was no pond - i Could be just snow
and then, what if there was a lone poplar or birch tree, leafless, that went alllll the way up and off the canvas. it could peek out of the snow just below the pokey frosty horizon line, about a third of the way from the side edge (left or right side, doesn't matter). this would increase the depth illusion and eliminate the too balanced problem.

always there's room to go back into an oil painting, tho yes, sometimes it's just best to walk away for fear of overworking it. you get to decide when you're done.

la

kin3
08-06-2016, 10:46 AM
Remember to have fun. That is when I do my best paintings is I just have fun.

bocote
08-06-2016, 07:12 PM
To get better keep practicing. Other comments are good.

BR style is quite handy to start with, but as you go try to develop your own tool box and put whatever you pick up along the way in.

have fun,

Big_Lew
08-07-2016, 07:27 PM
yeah, if you want to add green it's probably best to not be working wet on wet. anything dry can certainly be reworked to change colors tho, keep that in mind.

composition, light source and color value are three of the most important things to concentrate on when creating works.

your 2nd image comp is superior here because it shows better balance (via zigzagging a bit) and depth (via soft distant trees and sharper foreground).

of your pink scene - what if ...
the pond went alllll the way across the bottom (cover up the two corner bottom bushes, they make no sense growing out of a pond anyway)
or
what if there was no pond - i Could be just snow
and then, what if there was a lone poplar or birch tree, leafless, that went alllll the way up and off the canvas. it could peek out of the snow just below the pokey frosty horizon line, about a third of the way from the side edge (left or right side, doesn't matter). this would increase the depth illusion and eliminate the too balanced problem.

always there's room to go back into an oil painting, tho yes, sometimes it's just best to walk away for fear of overworking it. you get to decide when you're done.

la

All good advice, La. I mostly keep my paintings hanging on the walls of my studio, I personally think I benefit from identifying what I like and don't like about each one. Kind of a "Hey - that's not BAD," and "UGH! Don't do THAT again!" thing, all at once! Plus I find it encouraging to see my progress painting-to-painting.

I've been thinking a LOT about my choice to pursue BR as a starting point. Here's what I want to learn, in descending order of importance:

1) How to do successful alla-prima landscape paintings. (Of course, if I manage to become accomplished at all the aspects of oil painting I list below, I'll be able to successfully paint alla-prima landscapes, but that's my primary goal.)

2) Composition.

3) Color (hue) mixing.

4) How to mix & use appropriate values.

5) Brush choices & their painting techniques.

6) Knife painting techniques.

7) Aerial perspective.

I understand that all these goals are interrelated. For example, if I don't get a color choice right the value won't matter - and vice versa.

For me, I hope BR is just my starting point.

Peace,

Big Lew

Big_Lew
08-07-2016, 07:31 PM
Remember to have fun. That is when I do my best paintings is I just have fun.

AMEN, kin! One of the things I like about learning BR style is the "instant gratification" aspect. I tried oils about 10 years ago - just from books. I didn't do ANYTHING that I felt was good enough to encourage me. I kept at it, and eventually petered out. Trying the BR style has been a positive re-entry for me. My WORST BR style painting is FAR better than any of my old efforts. I'm willing to put in some work, but I need some encouragement, too!

Peace,

Big Lew

Big_Lew
08-07-2016, 07:32 PM
To get better keep practicing. Other comments are good.

BR style is quite handy to start with, but as you go try to develop your own tool box and put whatever you pick up along the way in.

have fun,

Good advice, bocote.

Please see my 2 posts directly above for details on how I view painting in general, and BR style alla prima in particular.

Peace,

Big Lew

kin3
08-08-2016, 12:11 PM
Seeing your list, I would recommend looking into Jerry Yarnell's site. He teaches just what you are talking about. He does all media but mainly Acrylics, which can apply to oils as well.