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Yvonne Keogh
07-25-2016, 01:05 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Jul-2016/1985576-oil3_v4.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: oil#3 Morning Lake
Year Created:
Medium: Oil
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 18 x 24
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
I struggled to copy a photo, then decided to repaint the parts I couldn't fix and came up with a new painting. (My rescue process is in the WIP forum.) I really struggled with the water but I think it works now in some places and maybe not so much in others. I am still trying to figure out how to create layers of depth. I think my composition is improving and I'm happy with the atmosphere of it.

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
I'd appreciate any and all comments, suggestions, tips...
I'd like to know what is working well and what is not.

La_
07-25-2016, 02:32 PM
ah, you flash me back to the good old days

a tip that might help you along in this oil journey
patience - oils Love to be layered, neeeed to be layered.
with that in mind, consider the following plan for your next piece
- sketch your composition with thinned, soupy paint, pale color (i like to use yellow ochre and white, very wet - not dribble down your canvas wet, but close). No details, just shapes, very loose/messy/scribbly. back up often, take in the whole piece, think about the comp - is it welcoming, inviting, is perspective correct, is water Flat - adjust as necessary.

that layer will dry very quickly as the thinners evaporate, like take a coffee break kind of quickly.

next layer don't use thinners, but add paint very sparingly, start at the farthest away points, more cool colors, more soft edges and more white/lights will help show distance ... slowly moving forward with darker values. this is not a finishing layer - patience.

let this dry for a day or two or three [depending on heat/humidity in your area]

come back with fresh eyes and study what you've got so far - is your centre of interest in the right spot ... is the depth showing itself ... does the composition lead you in.

finishing layer(s) - concentrate on the most important parts - main subject (be it a tree or a glimmer of reflection on water, whatever it is) ... secondary subject (supporting actors) - balance with main subject (not fight, balance).
Everything else supports the main subject, let it be blurry, less defined.

hope that helps :)

la

p.s. specific tip on trees - peek-a-boo - it's rare that a tree is So thick/full that No view through its branches can be seen. try to create trees that are not solid walls.

Mr linseed
07-25-2016, 03:41 PM
Great post La,

When you return after a day or three, and let's assume you live somewhere hot/humid, should you add a little medium to your paint? I'm confused by the 'fat over lean' rule and when it applies?!

La_
07-25-2016, 04:38 PM
i don't use medium, i've found it leaves shiny spots so i treat it like an all or nothing thing and have chosen nothing.
others may certainly disagree.
'fat', to me means chunky paint, thicker, smeared, knifed even (generally applied after the comp is figured out).
'lean' is smooth, decent coverage but little actual texture.
both are just a style preference, i prefer lean with a brush and fat(ter) with a knife.

another thought for you, clair - try not to rely on thick paint to get the look of thick/3d, use color/value/light/shadow instead for more control and quicker drying.

la

Yvonne Keogh
07-25-2016, 06:46 PM
Thanks La - you're totally right about the trees.
I was using the alla prima alla Bob Ross method because I'm an impatient painter - short cuts short cuts everywhere. I like expressive brush strokes too.
But I've been thinking to maybe, possibly, try the old school method of layering so your tutorial is helpful. I may try grisaille.

It is hot and humid where I live but we have air conditioning.

The trees farthest in the distance, I have no idea how to paint them.

La_
07-25-2016, 08:01 PM
Thanks La - you're totally right about the trees.
I was using the alla prima alla Bob Ross method because I'm an impatient painter - short cuts short cuts everywhere. I like expressive brush strokes too.
But I've been thinking to maybe, possibly, try the old school method of layering so your tutorial is helpful. I may try grisaille.

It is hot and humid where I live but we have air conditioning.

The trees farthest in the distance, I have no idea how to paint them.

distant trees would typically be smaller, softer, paler, cooler than any tree in front of them.

la

watchinpaintdry
07-26-2016, 12:22 PM
If you squint your eyes and look at your painting, the trees in the foreground and the rock formation stand out, and detract from the water reflections which are well done I am thinking they could use darker values, maybe,

northcanadian
08-09-2016, 07:07 PM
Nice one...perhaps a bit of morning mist coming off the lake towards the background, plus a tad more cool blue in the distance for a bit more atmospheric perspective(???)

Yvonne Keogh
08-16-2016, 04:15 PM
Nice one...perhaps a bit of morning mist coming off the lake towards the background, plus a tad more cool blue in the distance for a bit more atmospheric perspective(???)

Thanks! Good ideas!

~JMW~
08-16-2016, 08:55 PM
The rock cliff/edges are so large and light , that they kind of over power everything else..
In the background would the rocks be as big , compared to the far trees?
If the rocks tapered down in size into the distance...and soften muted.. same for far trees..
Practice other tree techniques , Bob Ross is Ok if you really like that look, but not very realistic...a mix of tree painting videos on YT is very helpful, find a style you like ...

nL aNVOR
08-17-2016, 12:08 AM
I wish you put the same amount of tolerence in the coloration of the rest of the painting that you placed in the reflective part .because it woul be a great work//;)

nL aNVOR
08-17-2016, 12:09 AM
I wish you put the same amount of tolerence in the coloration of the rest of the painting that you placed in the reflective part .because it woul be a great work//;)

Yvonne Keogh
08-18-2016, 04:14 PM
I wish you put the same amount of tolerence in the coloration of the rest of the painting that you placed in the reflective part .because it woul be a great work//;)

What does "tolerence in the coloration" mean?

Yvonne Keogh
08-18-2016, 04:19 PM
The rock cliff/edges are so large and light , that they kind of over power everything else..
In the background would the rocks be as big , compared to the far trees?
If the rocks tapered down in size into the distance...and soften muted.. same for far trees..
Yes you're right. I have trouble with depth-distance. This painting went through a lot of error-fixing stages.

Practice other tree techniques , Bob Ross is Ok if you really like that look, but not very realistic...a mix of tree painting videos on YT is very helpful, find a style you like ...
I will explore other techniques, but I love being able to do a painting in a short period of time, not weeks and weeks. When I learned Chinese brush painting I fell in love with the idea that in ONE STROKE you could get 3 tones, the essence of an image and a LOT of expression in the minimum amount of time - but a lot of training goes into that one stroke! Bob Ross is doing that too for oils.

~JMW~
08-18-2016, 04:33 PM
If you haven't invested a lot in your oils...maybe acrylics would be a better fit for you... I sure like the quick drying factor , but I still am able to blend , but it takes some practice time & speed -, but if you goof an easy fix , just paint over the top...in few sec when the goof is dry..

~JMW~
08-18-2016, 04:34 PM
Or you can do the rough in/ under painting w/ acrylics and then oils to finish it out..

Yvonne Keogh
08-18-2016, 05:07 PM
If you haven't invested a lot in your oils...maybe acrylics would be a better fit for you... I sure like the quick drying factor , but I still am able to blend , but it takes some practice time & speed -, but if you goof an easy fix , just paint over the top...in few sec when the goof is dry..

I did invest in oils, but I do prefer them because I just don't get the same brush control and subtle variety of colour in acrylic as I do in oils. They don't want to cooperate with me - they dry too fast! But painting oils over top acrylics is interesting. It's the same idea as the coloured gesso with oil. Thanks