PDA

View Full Version : How do you organize your palette?


Ead
10-21-2003, 11:13 AM
I read many books recommend that I should take the wrap off the new pastels and break them into half. I intend to do so now.

Here come my next question how should I organize those unlabled pastels. May I get idea from you about your way(s) of handling your palette with hundreds of naked pastels? :D

Thanks for sharing it to me.
Ead

Stoy Jones
10-21-2003, 12:04 PM
Hi Ead, I have heard of different ways and any of them I guess are fine as long as you understand your set up. I, for one, am just starting and my palette at this moment is a mess!

You can divide your colors by tone, value, or temperature. Tone being by the lightness or darkness, value by strength of color, or temperature being whether cool or warm. If I blundered here, let me know. I have read a lot of stickys this week and may get my wires crossed :D but that is how I understand it so far.

I suppose it is how you use your color is how you may determine your set up. I will watch this thread to see some more responses to get ideas as they come. Thanks for posting a great question.

Stoy

Mary Robinson
10-21-2003, 12:48 PM
I'm afraid I'd be a very bad example to follow. :evil: I keep all of my pastels in plastic drawers by color. I yank out what I think I will use for a particular painting and throw them all down on a towel in front of me. If I find I need more shades, I go back into the drawer and pull it out also. I like sitting the floor while I'm painting and our german shepard likes to carry off my pastels if he thinks I'm neglecting him, so I can also use the towel to cover them up. I have a large oak easel, which I never use. And a cheap telescoping watercolor easel which is where you'll find me.


:D

SweetBabyJ
10-21-2003, 01:28 PM
I do about the same as Morgie- I kinda look and lay out what it is I think I'll need, I have to or else I'm worse than a kid in a candy store and try to use all the colours at once. Then I set them up in a "cool/warm" arrangement, but I'm not all that disciplined, and very soon I'm searching through 15 sticks for "that light lavender- where is that? I just used it...."

I'll peel 'em, but I hate breaking them. Just seems kinda sacreligious....

bnoonan
10-21-2003, 01:52 PM
Hi there,


Here's a photo of my portable set that I carry around most of the time - for class, hiring models, in the field, etc.

I immediately remove the wrapper, break them into thirds, and group them by color and value (for the most part). You'll see lots of discrepancies in this photo.

For this particular box, I keep the dark colors towards the hinge (the bottom of the box as I'm carrying it) - so the dark dust doesn't fall all over the light colors.

Oh - I keep my light neutrals together too.

Barb (this may change next year - it depends what works best for me at the time I'm painting)


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Oct-2003/13264-palette.jpg

Meisie
10-21-2003, 01:57 PM
I take the labels off, then make a color swatch, label it with make/name/number to make it easier to get replacements. I store them in their original boxes (open stock in another container) I break mine and so when I clean up after a painting it is easy to match it back to the original place in the right box. While painting I use a box with plastic dividers to keep the 'current' pastels, and if they get dirty, it is best to clean them before storing away. I put everything away, before I start a new painting...
HTH
Meisie

Deborah Secor
10-21-2003, 02:32 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Oct-2003/23609-palette.jpg

By color, in rainbow order, and by value. Tell you more when I get a chance but maybe this will help...

Deborah

CarlyHardy
10-21-2003, 03:03 PM
I work plein air almost all the time with my pastels. Time is one of the most important elements when working on location because of the constant light changes! Like Deborah, I tend to sort by color/value.

My lightest lights on the upper left, middle tones range across the center, lower left to upper right, and darkest values/colors in the lower right diagonal corner.

This makes it much faster picking up a color because...my hand will move to the area of value as my eye is discerning it in the landscape. It takes some time working with the pastels to develop this relationship between the palette/the hand/and the eye, but it does happen. If my pastels were all in a jumble, it would take me much too long to sort them out with the eye and grab the right one...and by then, I'd also lose what my eye had recorded! Sort of like a balancing act! I'm always looking for new ways to cut down on the use of my time in the painting process...so that I can concentrate more on the subject!

I don't pick out colors and set them aside....I like to see all the colors at once. The eye is so discerning that you can pick a color in a landscape....then immediately scan all your colors and the eye will 'match' the color/value.

I once ask..."how do you find the four-leaf clovers so easily?" and the reply was "because I only look for them...they stand out from all the others!" In the same way, I look for the color that stands out from all the others. Sorting my pastels into lights to darks, warm to cool, just simplifies the search.

carly

crazyartist2000
10-22-2003, 11:32 AM
Originally posted by bnoonan
Hi there,
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Oct-2003/13264-palette.jpg


Wow!!! look at all the pretty colours!! broke in 3rds!!!
I cried when I broke a little peice off the end of each of mine!!! u mean I have to break them more!!!!!:eek:

I'm so knew I still have them in little boxes they came in LOL

bnoonan
10-22-2003, 02:28 PM
I break my pastels up right away and use the sides of them to work - rather than the ends - unless it requires a sharp edge for a line.

Breaking them up is so much fun!!! Dusty - dirty and messy - but fun!!!

Barb

Meisie
10-22-2003, 02:37 PM
I also use the sides of mine way more than the tips, that is why I break mine too ;)
Meisie

bcraver
10-22-2003, 02:48 PM
For some reason, although I have lots of broken pastels, I have always kept the Unisons intact, which now that I think about it, means that I can't use all those wonderful colors if I want to use the side of the pastel . . .

So, looking at BNoonan's picture, I don't think I can see see any Unison sized sticks, and Deborah's has a Unison with its label on.

Just want to see if others have bravely gone before in breaking their Unisons before I try it (I'm a chicken!)

crazyartist2000
10-22-2003, 02:51 PM
Barb?? Did you make that box?? what is the insert made out of??

bnoonan
10-22-2003, 02:55 PM
Hi there,
I've only purchased one unison pastel and I did break it up - it broke my heart because it's so soft and I knew there were goign to be unused fragments.... however... I really like using the side of the pastel.

Barb

it was worth it~

bnoonan
10-22-2003, 02:59 PM
Sorry - we cross posted.

The box is great! It came from an art store in Wyoming that was phasing out it's pastels from stock (found out about it through WC and made some great purchases that way).

There's no manufacturer name on the box but it looks like just an empty wooden box. They put down a thin layer of foam on each side and then cut up the foam separators from a box of Rembrandts to use dividers. Since the dividers didn't take up a complete side, another set of foam - thicker and the depth of the box was added.

To keep the lids on - they use velcro.

A similiar box is on the back cover of the Dakota Art supply catalog for 2003. It's called Dakota Universal Travel Boxes. It's slightly different but not by much.

If you need a closer photo - let me know.

Barb

Marc Sabatella
10-22-2003, 04:45 PM
I think you'll find as many organizational methods as artists. I used to use the method I learned from Doug Dawson - hundreds of inch-long wrapperless chunks all thrown together in a container of rice flour; sift out the pastels when ready to use and dump them in a big heap. Eventually I got tired of the mess as the rice flour gets in the air, and also not knowing what sticks I was using up. Now I work with a "limited" palette of around 80 sticks - also just inch-long wrapperless chunks. I keep the rest of the sticks with wrappers on nicely organized. As a stick in my working set gets used up I match it to the wrapped sticks to figure out which one it was, break off another chunk, and if I use up a stick in the process, add that color to my shopping list and replace it ASAP.

The working pastels go directly into my Russian easel, which I have lined with foam. There are 5 compartments, 3 of which can hold about 20-30 of these chunks, and the others two are smaller. I put all more reds, yellows, and oranges in one compartment, blues and violets in another, greens and earth tones in another. The two smaller compartments I use to keep the dozen or so sticks I actually use for a given painting separate from the rest, and then I return them when done. Within the large compartments, there is no particular order, although I am considering cutting slots in foam lining so I can a specific place for everything, just to make the task of replacing used up chunks a little easier (sometimes it is hard to tell a light value of, say, a blue green from the same value of a green-blue).

bnoonan
10-22-2003, 04:57 PM
Marc,
Can you please post a photograph of your easel. It would be great to see how it's used.

I've never tried rice flour. I use a ziploc bag of ground cornmeal to clean off my pastels. I just pop a handful of dirty pieces into the bag, shake, shake, shake and then grab them out. I have a plastic sieve that leaves the corn meal behind. Works pretty efficiently.

I also end up vacuuming the foam carrier by covering the entire pastel box with a window screen and using the hose - remove the dust.

Although my pastels often end up in a mix-matched pile at the end of a painting session, I can't imagine starting out my day painting that way. Yikes.

Barb

Deborah Secor
10-22-2003, 06:51 PM
Wait--I break the Unisons just like any other pastel. I usually sort of snap them with the paper on and then pull out a chunk from the end leaving the wrapped section in my box. What you see in my palette is some Townsends that are rather new with the wrappers on and one or two Schminckes--and one as-yet unwrapped yellow Unison that just hadn't gotten the treatment yet.

The only ones I don't buy are Senneliers. In our climate (hot, dry, dry, dry) they crumble to dust as soon as you unwrap them. A few usable little chunks is one thng--a miniature pyramid of dust is just a waste of money!

Oh, and this is my full time take-it-everywhere palette. So convenient to take a working palette to each class. No muss, no fuss. always know where the pastels are...

Deborah

Kathryn Wilson
10-22-2003, 08:07 PM
I finally got brave and broke my Unison's - it broke my heart as there are little chunks all over, then I discovered dee's method, break them inside the wrapper and pull out one end.

I have two boxes of pastels next to my easel - one for lights and one for darks, then sorted by color. My Art Bin holds my traveling pastels and I keep my oldest set in their wooden box with the wrappers still in tact, but broken in two.

As I work and pull out the colors, I do not put them back in the box/tray - I have a separate tray for the pastels I am currently working with.

Ead
10-24-2003, 12:16 AM
Hello everyone. Thanks to share your way of handling your pastels and palette.

I started unwrap those pastels and break them apart. I have Rembrant and W&N. Though they are not as crumble as some other mentioned brands but they do create litte pieces which I kept them in small containers by shade for future usage, e.g. for background.

It took me 2 hours to do the job for around 80 sticks of pastel. The wrappers are very sticky. One reason I think of is I stay in very hot country so the glue can easily melt.

I feel very happy now since I can see all my color in just one box instead of 3 those are very difficult to carry and use. And they are now ready to be used on their side. Hopefully it will help me paint bold this way since I usually a kind of detail lover.

By the way, I choose to arrange it light to dark, with a separation of warm and cool. Let's see whether it will work for me or not.
:)

Ead

Marc Sabatella
10-24-2003, 03:16 AM
Originally posted by bnoonan
Marc,
Can you please post a photograph of your easel. It would be great to see how it's used.


Here it is:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Oct-2003/29333-pastels.JPG

The colors are little off - those bright reds in with the greens are actually browns. Note the small compartment at the bottom right of the picture is my working palette for the last painting I did. The whole collection looks more sparse than it seems when I am painting... but I do enjoy having this simplified palette to work with.


Although my pastels often end up in a mix-matched pile at the end of a painting session, I can't imagine starting out my day painting that way. Yikes.


I wasn't sure how I'd like it when I first switched from ArtBins with the nice slots to the big pile, but I ended up liking it almost instantly. The process of painting with pastels in a pile never bothered me at all; it was the other concerns I mentioned.

Shari
10-24-2003, 04:34 AM
There is a thread about this somewhere from a couple years ago with lots of pics of people's set up. I am including my box here. It is Heilman box and is fabulous.

Shari

bnoonan
10-24-2003, 12:37 PM
Marc, Thanks for sharing the photo of your set up. I've never seen this type of easel before - very interesting.

Ead - Be sure to wash those hands very well before handling that baby after your pastels. I shudder to think of the dust in that little baby's system.

By the way - do you use a hand cream barrier before you paint and after? I think it's helpful but perhaps not perfect.

Shari - I think you posted information on the Heilman box before and I kept that thread as a link in my favorites. I'm sure that will be my next box.


Barb

Meisie
10-24-2003, 02:27 PM
I've just started a painting and this time I'm wearing a gloves. It takes a little getting used to, but it sure saves on handwashing, (which bothers me more than the dust) I still pull the fingers out for certain touches though ;)
Meisie

bcraver
10-24-2003, 03:00 PM
Wait--I break the Unisons just like any other pastel. I usually sort of snap them with the paper on and then pull out a chunk from the end leaving the wrapped section in my box. What you see in my palette is some Townsends that are rather new with the wrappers on and one or two Schminckes--and one as-yet unwrapped yellow Unison that just hadn't gotten the treatment yet.

Great! Thanks for the information Deborah! BTW, your distant mountains and sunset painting was beautiful. And I enjoy your articles and work in Pastel Journal.

We are so lucky to have people participating in this forum who are such recognized authorities in pastel! I feel like I "know" Jakki Simmonds after watching her videos and then seeing her messages in this forum all the time! (Even though she persists in pronouncing 'Pas tel' (emphasis on the second syllable) as 'pas' tel' (emphasis on the first syllable)) ;) ;) ;)

Marc Sabatella
10-24-2003, 05:55 PM
Originally posted by bnoonan
Marc, Thanks for sharing the photo of your set up. I've never seen this type of easel before - very interesting.

Ah. In that case, I should have shown the easel fully set up - I just opened the box to show you how the pastels go in. Here is the Yarka Russian field easel in use:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Oct-2003/29333-setup.JPG

If you are still curious, you might want to check out the sites of the various online retailers that sell it, or a decent sized art store - it's a pretty widely available product. It is usually sold as a cheaper "student" version of a French easel, but I actually find it an improvement over the French easel for plein aire work. It's about half the price and about half the weight, yet the storage capacity is comparable, you can work just about as big, and the legs and canvas/board support don't seem in danger of breaking off if the easel is knocked around a bit during transport. Only downside is that, unless you work smaller than the size of the easel (and as you can see I don't, necessarily), you have to carry your board separately while hiking to your location, since the support is on the *inside* of the box. Also, store display models often seem unstable, but that's usually just because some screws may need tightening. I love it - I just carry it and my drawing board and that's it. It even has a good carrying strap. Of course, if you don't do a lot of plein aire work, there is no real advantage to any of this.



Shari - I think you posted information on the Heilman box before and I kept that thread as a link in my favorites. I'm sure that will be my next box.

You should also check out the "Cassatt" box sold by Dick Blick - it seems very similar in design for less than half the price.

Anna Marie
10-24-2003, 06:53 PM
There is a thread on this from a while ago!http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=60651&highlight=

I must admit I dont unwrap but occassionally break my unisons in half.

blissfullyunaware
10-24-2003, 07:28 PM
ARRRGGHHHH this is scarey... break all my pastels :o, throw them willy nilly in my box :o!!! LOL... I'd seen another pastel artist do this and I was shocked... but its the norm apparently. I will bravely go and do the deed... simply because it seems like fun and 2 I get to break my pastels :evil: without guilt!!!! Also, I was having trouble trying to get everything in the durn art bin... the larger pastels don't fit... had 3 boxes going here. Thanks also for the tip on how to "clean" up the pastels and the boxes!!!

Really great thread!!! :cool: :clap:

~~~ Sharon

BruceF
10-24-2003, 08:21 PM
I see the reason to break up the pastels and organize them in a box, but how do you know what you need to replace when your finished with the stick. Does everyone stick to one or two brands to avoid confusion? Or just go to the store and get what you think you used up?

bnoonan
10-24-2003, 10:18 PM
Replacing colors of pastels is tricky but I find that I will keep 1/2 put away in it's wrapper with the code number on it. When I'm running low, I go refer to the original source.

However... when I've used up the original, I'm out of luck and either try to replace it by memory or just make the color by mixing two of what I have.

A scientific approach? Not a chance. I'm an arteestt!!

Barb

Deborah Secor
10-25-2003, 01:15 PM
You know, maybe it's because I've been painting with pastels for so long but there are only so many colors in pastels that you need to replace! I find that over the 17 years I've painted I've come to 'need' only certain key colors, not every one in my palette. For instance, I rely on a few greens and blues that I almost always need for a landscape in my neck of the woods. I have one orange and one purple that I always want to have. There's one gray-green that's quite useful, too, and one yellow-white that I use up quite often. I know the brands and names/numbers of these colors so when they're gone I can be sure to get them.

However, I've also found that when I don't have them I sometimes get creative and find some new way to get around the problem, and that has often strengthened my painting, so I don't fret too much.

Every once in a while I go out and replace a whole set, just splurge on something I've been wanting to have, and then I find some new colors--or maybe just rediscover ones that I've forgotten about.

I love color and have been pegged as a 'colorist' by some, but when I need a lift I simply clean my palette and organize the colors I have and then I'm all jazzed to go paint again. That's when they become eye candy, just waiting to be tasted, in the visual sense...

Deborah

Meisie
10-25-2003, 04:28 PM
Marc- that easel looks really nice, BUT what I would love to see is the painting you did next to that stream. Can you show us please? ;)
Meisie

just dave
10-25-2003, 05:10 PM
When I get new pastels I "index" them; something I read in a book that has worked for me. But I have seen no other pastel artist do this! Everyone seems to have them in boxes or sections in boxes without labels, grouped by color family.

"Indexing" them involves taking a razor blade and cutting each (full stick with label) just past the color number on the label. That piece goes into the ArtBin Pastel3 tote I have. Now, if I need the rest of that pstel again, I can match that color. I remove the label on the piece left and cut it again into two uneven pieces. I put the shorter piece with the indexed piece so that if I use up or break my "working piece" I still have a bit to use.

I have seevral ways I organize my working pieces, though.

Marc Sabatella
10-25-2003, 05:20 PM
Originally posted by Meisie
Marc- that easel looks really nice, BUT what I would love to see is the painting you did next to that stream. Can you show us please? ;)
Meisie

Well, sure. Actually, the reason I have a picture of my easel is that I took a series of pictures of the work in progress and wrote up something about it for my web site, so you might want to check that out - see

http://www.outsideshore.com/school/art/around_the_bend/

But, to cut to the chase, here is the finished painting:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Oct-2003/29333-studio_final.JPG

If you look at the photo of my easel at the scene, you will see that what I painted is represented by the top left corner of the photo.

Deborah Secor
10-25-2003, 05:46 PM
Dave, that bit of advice on indexing pastels must have come from one of Albert Handell's books. I worked with him for seven years and that's how he did it. I started out that way but just found that little old unorganized me ended up with a whole box of pastel ends that I finally stripped and dumped into my palette! I guess we all think a bit differently, huh?

By the way, I always chart the colors of a whole set as soon as I get one that's totally new to me. I usually take the color chart the manufacturer sends and cut it into strips. Then I tape it into my sketchpad and make a little mark of each color beneath the one from the chart. That way I have all the names/numbers and a color sample, plus I know what it looks like in the color chart so it can be found in a store. Mind you, in the last 10 years I've never used this chart myself, for the reasons mentioned above, but my students find it helpful! So, I think it's a good tool.

Deborah

Meisie
10-25-2003, 09:13 PM
Marc, thank you! It's beautiful, and I recognised it straight away! I'm following the thread.....
Meisie

just dave
10-27-2003, 05:04 PM
I just can't use the "dumb sectional box" method! Each stick gets dust from the similar colors on them. My way, the ArtBin pastel tote keeps the dust from each sepearate, and I can use that for toning papers.

Artistammy
10-27-2003, 05:44 PM
Do you store your hard pastels & really soft ones together - like all the blues together? That's what it looks like. I still have mine in the set boxes they came in but I've been thinking about organizing them differently.

Marc Sabatella
10-27-2003, 06:46 PM
I just can't use the "dumb sectional box" method! Each stick gets dust from the similar colors on them. My way, the ArtBin pastel tote keeps the dust from each sepearate, and I can use that for toning papers.


Note if you store the pastels in rice flour (or cornmeal, which arguably works as well), the colors stay very clean. If you use a box with foam padding, there is definitely *some* cross-contamination, but if you keep similar colors and/or values together, it isn't really that bad - nothing that doesn't wipe away with the first stroke. The ArtBin boxes with the separate compartments, of course, do solve this problem, but they will only hold the smaller brands (Rembrandt, etc), plus they are a lot bulkier if you plan on transporting hundreds of pastels around.


Do you store your hard pastels & really soft ones together - like all the blues together? That's what it looks like. I still have mine in the set boxes they came in but I've been thinking about organizing them differently.


When I used pastels different hardness, I kept them all together, and I think most people who use these types of setups do as well. I never was one to work strictly hard-to-soft, but of course a Nupastel looks different enough from the other brands that they are pretty easy to pick out visually if you want a hard one for underpainting, which I did occasionally. Sometimes I'd use a relatively hard Rembrandt pastel sucessfully early in the painting, but get frustrated it wouldn't work for me later. Eventually, I decided I had no use at all for harder pastels, and all I use is Schmincke.

Craig Houghton
10-28-2003, 03:50 AM
I'm using the indexing approach and storing my 'master' pastels in racks that fit into a multi-tiered thing I built into my studio table.

my working palette looks like this (294 schmincke,rembrandt,unisons + 65 nupastels, but they fit in a fairly small area which is great for working):

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Oct-2003/21273-studio_palette.JPG

The layout mimics my oil palette with warms on top (right 11 rows) and cools on bottom (right 11 rows). Along the left side there's warm earths (left 4 rows) on top and cool earths (left 4) on bottom.

My plein air palette is less organized and there's still some wrappers floating around there:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Oct-2003/21273-outdoorpalette.JPG

Also, regarding how to break pastels: I've found that breaking them in the wrapper works wonders (as others have mentioned), but I also stumbled upon a 'toothpick' method.

For Unisons and other awkward-to-break pastels I lay them upon a toothpick (the exact spot determines the break point), press down very gently, and increase strength gradually until the pastel breaks.

It looks something like this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Oct-2003/21273-palette_to_break.JPG

This works really really well. The break is extremelly clean.

Once though (just once), I slipped and crushed a unison under-hand (i must have hand-thwacked it at just the right angle). Here's the crime scene:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Oct-2003/21273-palettebroken.JPG

Generally though, the toothpick method worked for the tough stuff. It's particuarly usefull when breaking off 1/4 inch peices for my plein air box -- without it I wouldn't even try.

The other nice thing about disrobing or breaking ones pastels, is that you get to view a 'sea of pastel' while sorting, and that's a seriously inspiring landscape.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Oct-2003/21273-paletteocean.JPG

Great thread everyone!
Craig

Deborah Secor
10-28-2003, 11:26 AM
Ooooooooo, Craig, that last photo begs to be painted! Neat 'landscape' of pastels.

Your toothpick idea is great. Good one--I'll give it a try.

Deborah

bcraver
10-28-2003, 03:05 PM
Once though (just once), I slipped and crushed a unison under-hand (i must have hand-thwacked it at just the right angle). Here's the crime scene:

ROTFL!!! Thank you so much for your wit and documentation, it does feel like a horrible crime scene to me!

I started out that way but just found that little old unorganized me ended up with a whole box of pastel ends that I finally stripped and dumped into my palette! I guess we all think a bit differently, huh?

Its reassuring to know that artists who obviously know what they are doing are able to work without being totally organized (at least I am reassured!)

My first teacher, Jakki Kouffman, said that when she was at the Art Student's League she got to be Daniel Greene's assistant and that one of her jobs at the end of the day was to clean up all his pastels and put them back in order! I always think of that when I see his great tray of pastels in his teaching videos - someone later wiping them all up and putting them back.

Ead
11-06-2003, 12:37 PM
Craig, your toothpick tip is wonderful. I've just try it. It's very neat and precise. Thanks a lot for the idea.

Shari
11-06-2003, 09:47 PM
The toothpick is a great idea!! I love everyone's creative ideas. My box (shown earlier) doesn't reflect the hundreds of unisons and terry ludwigs which are in their own boxes. I break the Unisons also, I can't work with a big piece of pastel. Terry's pastels are fabulous and they have great sharp edges for finer work. I love Terry's pastels and I wish I had all his greens!!!! The box only holds so many but I do put quite a few nupastels in with the others as I start out with the harder ones.

Shari

pampe
11-06-2003, 09:53 PM
why is it when I see a bunch of color photos of pastels like this....I feel like a drunk looking into a bar?





:rolleyes: :evil:

Stoy Jones
11-06-2003, 10:55 PM
Originally posted by pampe
why is it when I see a bunch of color photos of pastels like this....I feel like a drunk looking into a bar?


:rolleyes: :evil:

LoL! I don't think there will be any PA for you...:evil:

Stoy