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Ladybay
11-18-2015, 10:11 AM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/11-18-2015/106080_IMG_4611.JPG


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/11-18-2015/106080_Cows.JPG


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/11-18-2015/106080_IMG_3755_(2).JPG



GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Tingwall Valley Cows
Year Created: 2014
Medium: Oil
Surface: Linen
Dimension: 60 x 70 cm
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
Shetland landscape an island north of Scotland UK . I like the sky formation , emphasising on the vastness of the clouds . Showing great prospective . I am pleased with the finished painting , with a wonderful coverage of sap green .

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
Do you think I could push the layers of thin glazing further for a better effect especially along the line of the hills ? Buy doing that I might loose the intended brush work. I think very thin layers of glaze might work next time .

Feedback is appreciated , thank you .

KolinskyRed
11-18-2015, 01:17 PM
Beautiful painting! May I ask, do you feel that the photo image does the painting justice? I am wondering, since the gamut of oils is great than photography can show, and greater than digital display can show. Your question about the glazing, could you elaborate? For example, how does the glazing change things?

Also I'm wondering if due to the compression of the gamut, the subtlety of glazing may not show, as relevant to your inquiry? Is the detailed shot of the cloud along the hills a faithful representation? Thanks!

KolinskyRed
11-18-2015, 02:35 PM
Original on the right, a few glazing edit suggestions/possibilities on the left below... perhaps on the left side of the sky glazing could tie the deep blue-ish green into the clouds above the hills? And into the hill shadow on the lake? The sun with a titch less reddishness? A little more sunlight in spots on the large lake, a touch more sunlight hitting the small, far pass, and tiny sun dapples around the cows? Hope this helps, Cheers!.

Ladybay
11-18-2015, 02:59 PM
Beautiful painting! May I ask, do you feel that the photo image does the painting justice? I am wondering, since the gamut of oils is great than photography can show, and greater than digital display can show. Your question about the glazing, could you elaborate? For example, how does the glazing change things?

Also I'm wondering if due to the compression of the gamut, the subtlety of glazing may not show, as relevant to your inquiry? Is the detailed shot of the cloud along the hills a faithful representation? Thanks!
Hi, yes it the picture colour is a good match and a good representation. Taken on a good camera . A Canon 450D .Bird watches use this type.

The glazing in thin layers can build up on the canvas softening the edges of the clouds giving it more depth and can't see the brush strokes . The detailed shot of the hills is again a true representation . I like that bit on the left. As there is a form of mist on the hill tops sometimes. Over painting with glaze if you like.... Did that make sense .

Ladybay
11-18-2015, 03:23 PM
Give me time to study it in day light. If you are changing the image/painting. How are you doing it ? It 's a very subtle change.

KolinskyRed
11-18-2015, 04:25 PM
This was in Photoshop using their non-destructive editing layers called "Layers Adjustments". For example, I made a selection of the clouds in the upper left corner, with the goal of making the violet-blue more greenish-blue. This was a "Color Balance" Adjustment Layer in Photoshop - using the logic of subtractive mixing principles - knocking out the reddish-ness of the blue by increasing the Cyan slider. I found increasing the Yellow slider a little bit (much less than the Cyan) was a pleasing combo.

So, from a paint mixture point of view - possibly a glaze of Phthalo Blue green shade mixed with Phthalo Green yellow shade? Or some equivalent. Possibly too colourful, those two being in thinfilm so very chromatic - so a greenish-blue and a cool yellow or greenish yellow - transparent? Experimentation for shifting towards a more turquoise (green-blue) result (?)

Being non-destrcutive the Photoshop image changes are only made in memory and the image isn't altered - so changes can always be tweaked or removed.

In that cloud corner as well, the same selection was adjusted with the "Brightness" Adjustment Layer in Photoshop. Here I reduced (darkened) the Brightness slider for the selection, but in a gradated way - that is, the selection was masked so the full effect of darkening happened deep in the upper-left corner, and faded towards the outer edge of the selection. This "Brightness" adjustment, I think, is darkening without loosing any saturation - the colour retains the original saturation, just "deeper, and as rich" - more specifically to avoid dulling it - that is loosing chroma/saturation. With darks, it's a very subtle distinction.

I was thinking I was bringing colours from the landscape up into the sky, and hadn't realized it would tie the sky in so well in that area to the hill top - as if it's come forward - which in turn makes the the whole cloudscape - which remains un-edited - more 3-D. Nice effect! All due to your excellent work.

I think because of your brushwork and design, those colours were already there to tie together. Yes, it is like mist.

Overall, it was a tiny tweak to an excellent painting.

I've learned, though, that less is more. A nice result from a small change in one spot doesn't mean I should brush it in more in other places - that might not work at all - sigh :)

I've attached a black and white version, and a chroma/hue version (again, edits on the left, original on the right). A hue/chroma layer, with all the values removed looks ordinary - but can be informative. This is the Lab Mode in Photoshop, channels turned off or on between L, a and b.

If I flick my eyes back and forth between the upper left corners, I can see the shift in the blues from the more reddish on the right and the more greenish on the left. Overall I was looking for large, general abstract colour patterns - and this is where I thought an artistic tie in of hills to sky might help - and tested that idea. It also fit into your painterly worldscape of the darkened stormy sky to the left against the lit sky on the right. Flicking back and forth on the values black and white layer, I can see also in the corner the subtle, graded darkening.

I feel that these changes fall under the glazing approach, just a bit of thoughts as to which paints....

Hope this helps!

Cheers!

HRobinson
11-19-2015, 03:07 PM
Hello. The only things I am really missing are the contrast with respect to your foreground treatment and the shadows which should be represented under the cattle. I agree with you. Your emotive treatment of the sky is outstanding. -h

Ladybay
11-19-2015, 05:57 PM
Hi h
Didn't think about the shadow under the cows . I didn't see it at the time.
Being wide angle view and couldn't see the darkness under the cows. Too much to concentrate on and thought didn't want to spoil it. Because I don't see it .- - Only paint what I see in respect of this sort of painting....... Did that make sense?

I think I did a nice job on the clouds. Have another painting , same location but with figures. Will get that on soon.

Thanks for your comments
Cheers