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View Full Version : Easiest way to "floodcoat" paper a single, all-over color?


Marie Meyer
11-12-2015, 06:35 PM
I'm looking for an economical way to make "colored paper". In other words, start with white paper, floodcoat it on one or both sides to change it to a single, all-over color (red, blue, yellow, etc.)

I'd like to use water-based inks as my colorant

I've never done any screen printing, but I'm familiar with the basic concepts. I don't have access to any kind of press. But I was thinking I might try just taping a screen onto on oversized piece of paper, squeegeeing on my color, and then trimming my paper down to the desired sized once dry.

Any thoughts? Would I benefit from having the screen in a frame, or is it going to get in my way? What would be a good mesh to start with?

Folio
11-13-2015, 07:19 AM
I think you would benefit from having the screen in a frame, to lift it off the paper cleanly in one movement. Mesh size, I use 12XX polyester, but I don't think the size would be critical for this application. You may find that the paper buckles with a large flat area of ink, more so with lightweight paper. You can minimize this with a heavier paper.

Marie Meyer
11-13-2015, 01:33 PM
Would the screen mesh impact the total weight of ink? In other words: is there something I could do to make sure the layer of ink is as thin as possible.

Also, if I decide I want to try stencils under the screen, would the screen mesh impact the performance?

Folio
11-13-2015, 02:29 PM
Would the screen mesh impact the total weight of ink? In other words: is there something I could do to make sure the layer of ink is as thin as possible.

Also, if I decide I want to try stencils under the screen, would the screen mesh impact the performance?
One pass with the squeegee will give a thinner layer of ink than two passes. Not certain but I don't think the size of the screen mesh would affect the weight of ink much.

Screen mesh size is an issue mainly when you're dealing with fine detail. For a tracing paper stencil any mesh will work, but for a photo-emulsion stencil with lots of critical detail, then the finer mesh might give better results.

Will be interested to hear how it works out for you.