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View Full Version : Roses under a blanket of snow


corfublue
11-05-2015, 06:43 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/11-05-2015/58344_image.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Roses under a blanket of snow
Year Created:
Medium: Acrylic
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 36x36
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
Actually collage too.
Keep flipping from abstraction to abstract .

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
Thoughts?

briankinderfineart
11-05-2015, 11:15 PM
not sure how I feel about this yet. Keep working.

corfublue
11-06-2015, 12:27 AM
It's done. Lol thanks

corfublue
11-06-2015, 12:37 AM
My approach is responding to a mark, then responding to the next and so on, it is also known as abstract expressionism. . It's not a preconceived composition. Try to keep in mind that like and dislike is a different conversation to a critique.
That, my friend (keep working) is not a critique. that is an opinion based on personal taste. Is not necessarily a critic. Because you don't like it doesn't mean it's bad art.
I don't know if I'm confusing your confidence with arrogance but just be aware of what you say in. Critic forum. You might want to think more then "keep working" IMO

briankinderfineart
11-06-2015, 02:26 AM
My approach is responding to a mark, then responding to the next and so on, it is also known as abstract expressionism. . It's not a preconceived composition. Try to keep in mind that like and dislike is a different conversation to a critique.
That, my friend (keep working) is not a critique. that is an opinion based on personal taste. Is not necessarily a critic. Because you don't like it doesn't mean it's bad art.
I don't know if I'm confusing your confidence with arrogance but just be aware of what you say in. Critic forum. You might want to think more then "keep working" IMO

You put words in my mouth by stating that I didn't like it. I never said that, I simply said I was not sure how I feel about it. I really had nothing further to say...give me some more and I will let you know if it blows me away trust me on that. Abstract art can really not be constructively critiqued in a way that realism or other representational genres can be. Their is neither a clear cut right or wrong with abstraction, simply a yeah I get it or no I really don't. Sorry. When you or anyone else wows me you will know it because I will do my best to let the world know it!

Keep doing your thing.

La_
11-06-2015, 02:33 AM
abstract, tho i do paint it, still very much confuses me and is an extremely subjective style of painting.
this one is balanced, similar to another you posted, but is much more loose and chaotic. i see things in it, it invites me to explore and the color combo is pleasing, but i would not gravitate towards purchase simply because the scribbly chaos is not to my taste, which has to play a part in abstract because it's relatively impossible to critique without including the induced reaction to the piece.
one could say it's a success because it did invite me in to explore and one could say it's a failure because it didn't inspire me to open my wallet.
quite frankly, there is no arguing in matters of taste and i readily welcome negative and positive comment, if it comes with reason/explanation, because that in itself is a critique, subjective or not, it's a view from a viewer and that feedback is the point of a critique.

la

Dana Design
11-06-2015, 10:36 AM
Given what everyone else has said and being objective about the comments, I must say that this is still not working for me. That's my eye looking and judging. Other eyes may see something else.

I do love abstract art but there must still be some sort of cohesion, a relativity to it. Were the top of the piece cropped just under the broad stripes of ochre and those stripes removed, it would make more sense to me.

corfublue
11-06-2015, 03:45 PM
You put words in my mouth by stating that I didn't like it. I never said that, I simply said I was not sure how I feel about it. I really had nothing further to say...give me some more and I will let you know if it blows me away trust me on that. Abstract art can really not be constructively critiqued in a way that realism or other representational genres can be. Their is neither a clear cut right or wrong with abstraction, simply a yeah I get it or no I really don't. Sorry. When you or anyone else wows me you will know it because I will do my best to let the world know it!

Keep doing your thing.

this is a critique forum. this is where people come to get constructive criticism where they may lack objectivity. to add ideas ad tools to their tool box.
your comment had no context. it doesn't do it for you has no context. surely someone with your skill level has something constructive to say.
does that mean you don't like it? that is not constructive. is there something technically that you are feeling tension with, that is constructive. give me something to think about it. im not posting in a forum called do you like my painting. I am struggling with a new genra of art and useful criticism, regardless if I like it or not gives me something to think about moving forward.
I have shown my work in some of the biggest cities in north America, I value the well thought out opinions of my peers.
and to add, I teach many workshops, I have been in this business for a long time. I have thick skin. but I will challenge you when I think its a matter of principle.
with all due respect and because I think you have something useful to offer, I would suggest you read the links on the top of this forum on how to give a critic. on almost all of my posts now your comments have been, its not doing it for me. or what not. what does that even mean? give your critique context. if you said that to a newbie, that could destroy them, be careful with your language. especially online.
im sorry, with your level of work surely you can bring something else to the table.

corfublue
11-06-2015, 03:55 PM
abstract, tho i do paint it, still very much confuses me and is an extremely subjective style of painting.
this one is balanced, similar to another you posted, but is much more loose and chaotic. i see things in it, it invites me to explore and the color combo is pleasing, but i would not gravitate towards purchase simply because the scribbly chaos is not to my taste, which has to play a part in abstract because it's relatively impossible to critique without including the induced reaction to the piece.
one could say it's a success because it did invite me in to explore and one could say it's a failure because it didn't inspire me to open my wallet.
quite frankly, there is no arguing in matters of taste and i readily welcome negative and positive comment, if it comes with reason/explanation, because that in itself is a critique, subjective or not, it's a view from a viewer and that feedback is the point of a critique.

la

its is new to be too. what I am learning is that abstract is taking the basic foundations of painting and bringing them to their most simple level and that is very hard.
here are guidelines I have been given by my mentors that might help you look at them. I found they have helped me immensely and I wrote them on my wall.

basic foundations can consist of,
line, texture, colour, value and shape.
they should also have an entry point, quiet areas and dominant shapes.(within reason)

all those elements should (breaking rules is cool too) be in a painting but one of them should outshine the others. abstract (expressionist) painting in my experience has been about putting or constructing all those elements then begging the process of deconstruction and therefore making decisions of what is going to stand out.
that is when you ask yourself, what is this painting trying to say.

with those ideas in mind, I am having an issue with what this painting is trying to say. after a day in the studio I just cant see it anymore. however having slept on it, I think I have colour dialed in. but there seems to be a conflict with texture and value. they are competing with eachother. also I think I am lacking some dominant shape.
but I cant really tell yet. that Is why I value fresh eyes.

and I readily invite negative comments as long as they are constructive and give me something to think about moving forward. believe me, I am not here to get hot air blown up my you know what. that's what shows are for. :wink2:

corfublue
11-06-2015, 03:57 PM
Given what everyone else has said and being objective about the comments, I must say that this is still not working for me. That's my eye looking and judging. Other eyes may see something else.

I do love abstract art but there must still be some sort of cohesion, a relativity to it. Were the top of the piece cropped just under the broad stripes of ochre and those stripes removed, it would make more sense to me.

its creating some kind of weird visual tension for me too. . I don't know what it is trying to say. there are many things I do like but I think I need to decide of one element and let that shine.

briankinderfineart
11-06-2015, 05:07 PM
Okay I will give you my best right now.

First of all in order to really give you a full bodied critique I would like to see your full body of work and know where you came from, are coming from and where you wish to go.

For instance, did you always work in this style/genre or did you come from a more traditional start? I would need to know that and I would need to see early and mid-career examples to understand your progression as an artist to see what growth you have had.

Now, speaking for abstract art specifically I will tell you that their are many things that I do to find my way and re-find my way when I am lost i it (because let's be really honest it happens).

Some of the very useful practices you can do to help yourself out of a creative bind and into a fresh new beginning with purpose:

1. Purpose - the painting must serve a purpose for you and for your audience...so what is it? Ask yourself before you start and as you are going. Are you serving the purpose of this new canvas?

2. Study other abstract artists a lot. Search and search and search. Soak it all in because it is powerful knowledge for your brain. You sometimes need to be reawakened by the lost time of self absorption by taking yourself out of yourself to see what the masters have done. And this study is not in any way to make you become like them, but just to get your visual senses ticking again. They get dull if they are not nurtured.

3. Turn your works upside down, left side right, look in a mirror at them. Paint them in different orientations and keep changing the direction as you see fit. Use your gut to tell you. This can help you to really see what you refused to see before (and this is a subconscious thing that happens to all of us).

4. Instead of just going right to the canvas with an open and free mind (which is all good and can be amazing!), try to sometimes do some design work on paper just with a pen or pencil. Work out some really strong visual designs using shape, texture and good composition first, then decide which has merit to become a painting.. Composition is key in any genre, remember that. I don't care if it is rembrandt or Jan Baltzell
(http://www.grossmccleaf.com/imagepages/segalanemonesplantorange.html) they all have one common denominator....GREAT COMPOSITION. Do some study on composition.

5. And when all else fails you can use a new tool...I call it sand paper. Take it down to the bare canvas or just scratch off what you don't want after you have built up layers of paint that do not work for you....sand it all down (but do not go to far because you will sand a nice little hole in your canvas then it is ruined). Now you have fresh ground to build from after you wash it all off with water or turpentine depending on what you are using.

6. Which brings me to number 6....oils. I know you specifically like acrylics but why not try oils? It may very well change your entire world. But you will not know until you give them the love they deserve. They are much different than acrylics and will give you a much different outcome and the entire process is different and quite a lovely one IMO.

7. And finally, try something brand new...try painting in the complete darkness. Let the subconscious mind take over fully. Don't you want to see what happens? Maybe even try to find a way to mix colors without looking at them first. Cover all of the outside paint labels so you don't know what colors they are. This way you have absolute diversity in your color box and they all have a fair chance of being used. Let it be chance, whatever you decide to pick will be come what you use to mix your color. Do not do this for white or black. You should be allowed to always know when to use them at any given moment.

I hope these words are more fitting for what you need and serve you well.

hward
11-06-2015, 07:30 PM
Usually I don't like abstract paintings. But you have a keen sense of color and rhythm. I find the painting pleasant, as opposed to most abstract paintings which use bravado to overwhelm the question of talent.

As for a critique, I'd say the angular forms don't quite balance the curved. Like the big beige stripe across the top. The painting needs it, but it looks a little awkward, a little out of place.

If you could paint something realistic with half this much color and vibrancy, wow.

corfublue
11-06-2015, 08:04 PM
Okay I will give you my best right now.




I hope these words are more fitting for what you need and serve you well.

thank you. although just a couple of ideas would be equally appreciated.
it has been my experience in the past that great ideas come from ideas that are talked about. giving reasons for your opinions gives you so much more depth and credibility as well as respect. I appreciate all your comments. yes this genre is new to me. I am very good at what I have been doing but not I am ready to go to another level.
I like the idea of sandpaper. I went to art school in montreal and I am very open to ideas and information
some of my abstracts are getting really thick.

.
I also find that explaining your own opinions can often help you as an artist recognize your own strengths. this process of critiquing should be as valuable to the artist as well as the one giving the critique.
I apologize if I seemed like an ass but when I see a strong artist give such and empty comments it confuses me.
now, if you will excuse me, I have 8 painting's on the go this week alone and its Friday early evening here. we are about to get a boat load of snow for skiing and its now happy hour.
:)
cheers

corfublue
11-06-2015, 08:07 PM
As for a critique, I'd say the angular forms don't quite balance the curved. Like the big beige stripe across the top. The painting needs it, but it looks a little awkward, a little out of place.

If you could paint something realistic with half this much color and vibrancy, wow.

I think you nailed it on the head. its like two paintings. the large sweeps and the textural whisps. they are both interesting but seem to be detracting form eachother.
unfortunately with this kind of painting, because its so automatic and ... gosh I cant think of the words right now, I think all I can do is hope for a more controlled concept for the next one. but its Friday. im tired. I have 9 wips going from this week. things might look more approachable to rework on Monday.
happy painting.
:)

karenlee
11-07-2015, 02:24 PM
I was attracted by the title, and I like the basic palette. But the comments~? Whoa.
I like the definition of abstract that I was given by my uncle, who was my first painting teacher. He said, "To abstract means to take from." It's that simple.
I would not say doing an abstract painting is automatic, because thought is involved in deciding WHAT to take, and what to leave out. For example, when you read the abstract of a scientific paper, it is a succinct summary, not an indecipherable garble.
For me, the pleasure of an abstract painting is recognizing and reacting emotionally to the elements contained in the image. How much is recognizable? That's up to the artist.
In this particular abstract, I feel the sense of depth/perspective needs to be more organized. Too many paint strokes are lying on the surface; this painting could show much more mysterious depth. It's up to you whether you want to develop that, or leave it flat. I will watch for further developments. Have fun!

greensyster
11-08-2015, 02:19 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Nov-2015/135872-58344a_image.jpg

Abstraction has its own drummer. One man's scribble is another man's dream. That said, for me to offer any critic for abstract art I look first for tones and their balance throughout the work, then of course the colours how they play together. I explain that because I glanced thru the above posts and thought 'Ye Gods and Little Fishes!' :D The tonal balance is larger at the outer edges - unbalanced perhaps. The chroma is intense again at the outer edge. Centrally there is a wide expanse of swirling that works well against eachother. The work I think could be enhanced without losing anything. Just for the sake of this posting, I append an image...

briankinderfineart
11-09-2015, 11:16 PM
Oh and I was thinking about you today and about something you said to me that made me want to let you know about something else that you could benefit from. I believe you were the one that asked me why I use oils and when I responded and told you why and let you know that I was letting one painting "set up" and dry for about a week you responded back as if this is too much for you to handle and you do not have the patience for it. So forgive me if I am wrong because you also stated in another thread about how you had to complete something like 9 paintings in one week....

So if these things are true I would much rather see you slow it down and take your time. Their is absolutely no need to complete even one painting in a week although you certainly can. I work until the painting stares me back in the face and says "if you lay another finger on me I'm calling the cops". No, but really I work until it is time to step away. That could be any where between three and three thousand days. I feel like you work too quickly and do not allow yourself the time to let your ideas formulate truly from your soul. Remember you need to let your hands and your soul play in time together (if that makes any sense). I am trying to help you.

Try taking your time and only work on one painting for a while and let it mature into something great!

Hope this helps you out.