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davefriend
10-05-2015, 08:31 PM
I have been working on this for longer than I want to remember. I cannot say I am finished with it yet. For it's size (12"x16") I have spent many times what I though I should have. Every time I would finish a session and come back to it the painting would just laugh at me and say you are wasting your time trying to get more out of me. Move on... I didn't but still I don't feel finished yet.

I call it "Overflown", at least for now. Take a look and feel free to make whatever comments and criticisms you wish. Thank you for taking your time to share your thoughts. :)


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Oct-2015/538491-overflown_12x16_596x800.jpg


Here is the grayscale version of the painting.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Oct-2015/538491-overflown_12x16_596x800_grayscale.jpg


Thanks again for looking. :wave:

birdhs
10-05-2015, 11:18 PM
restfully disturbing
actively calming
simply complex

and fascinating to study

greggo

Eraethil
10-06-2015, 12:31 AM
I love all of the interesting forms as usual. The colour scheme doesn't seem to be working like your others though. What about moving towards a triad and reducing the warm colours? Or maybe introducing more black line to unify it more? Tough one...

graphicali
10-06-2015, 03:46 AM
I love there are lots of things to see, lots of little scenes within the larger one. For me the colour distribution is too even, I would prefer to see just one or two dominant with small amounts of the third. At the end of the day though it is your feelings about it that matter most.

davefriend
10-06-2015, 09:32 AM
restfully disturbing
actively calming
simply complex

and fascinating to study

greggo Thanks greggo! :)

I love all of the interesting forms as usual. The colour scheme doesn't seem to be working like your others though. What about moving towards a triad and reducing the warm colours? Or maybe introducing more black line to unify it more? Tough one...Yes, these colors were a question from the beginning to me and the red-green-blue color scheme has been challenging. As to the warm colors/cool colors in the painting, I used 2 cool to 1 warm although the highlight areas are a cool color base with later layer of warm color so that may contribute to a more 50/50 balance in temperature distribution. You may see that there are some areas where the dark outlining is more concentrated or prominent that other places. This is subtle if you don't look closely in the color version but more obvious in the grayscale. If I don't abandon this painting altogether, the addition of some stronger and deeper outlining would be where my attention would be going. Thanks for your observations Rick! :thumbsup:

I love there are lots of things to see, lots of little scenes within the larger one. For me the colour distribution is too even, I would prefer to see just one or two dominant with small amounts of the third. At the end of the day though it is your feelings about it that matter most. I think this is a valid comment. While I was painting, I think the even distributional format did not disturb me as I was too busy fighting with the color harmonies to see through that to the balance issue. I doubt any changes I may make will affect that aspect of the painting. I am not sure how much more time I want to invest/waste on this to go much/any further. Thanks very much graphicali for your comments. :wave:

adamBomb
10-06-2015, 09:45 AM
I love it. I like it black and white and colored. Its one of those pieces that you could do 20 different ways and each would be cool.

FriendCarol
10-06-2015, 09:58 AM
Probably in full-size this does not apply, but I found my eye drawn to the various "eye" shapes in the posted pix. (My eyes aren't drawn much to value changes; I suspect many women, like me, are drawn to color rather than value.) So I can't actually identify the center of interest you intend. Intriguing work, though.

Mr. Nobody
10-06-2015, 02:17 PM
Works for me, it definitely gets my pareidolia going... I see faces, animals and all kinds of shapes. :)

vensunn
10-06-2015, 07:12 PM
I've studied and studied this
I like the flow/movement created by placement of shapes (there are just bits and pieces of negative space which is OK) and lines throughout the picture plane created by these elements
The color has it's own world which I don't find offensive
Steven

davefriend
10-07-2015, 01:45 AM
I love it. I like it black and white and colored. Its one of those pieces that you could do 20 different ways and each would be cool. Thanks AdamBomb (Love that moniker)

Probably in full-size this does not apply, but I found my eye drawn to the various "eye" shapes in the posted pix. (My eyes aren't drawn much to value changes; I suspect many women, like me, are drawn to color rather than value.) So I can't actually identify the center of interest you intend. Intriguing work, though.An intended center of interest was never specified and may or may not exist. You may find yourself like Noah's Dove that was sent out of the ark but found no rest for the sole of it's feet... The journey in this case is the experience and that, perhaps without a destination. :D

Works for me, it definitely gets my pareidolia going... I see faces, animals and all kinds of shapes. :)Mr. Nobody, thank you for the technical name for what I was trying to do in my "Out of Your Mind Series". In my artist's statement, I had described it this way: "...In developing this series, I have gained an appreciation for the dynamic interplay of the little things that our human mind uses to create recognition of objects and how even incomplete visual information can form complete images in our mind and influence our conclusions about what we are seeing. Because of this, my art depends more on the obscure than on the obvious. This, I believe, has increased the dynamic power of the images you see here...." Thanks again!!

I've studied and studied this
I like the flow/movement created by placement of shapes (there are just bits and pieces of negative space which is OK) and lines throughout the picture plane created by these elements
The color has it's own world which I don't find offensive
StevenThanks vensunn I'm so glad you found it interesting enough to keep looking into it. :wave:

bib
10-07-2015, 06:24 AM
Looks great!

davefriend
10-09-2015, 01:43 AM
Looks great!Thanks Angela! :D

Tripod
10-09-2015, 08:01 AM
Don't ever call it Overblown. I like it muchly and am not experienced enough to comment technically or artyfarty but it appeals, just as it is.

PushingPixels
10-09-2015, 02:23 PM
wow, fantastically alive

davefriend
10-11-2015, 07:51 PM
Don't ever call it Overblown. I like it muchly and am not experienced enough to comment technically or artyfarty but it appeals, just as it is.You do just fine Derek! I appreciate your nice words to me, thanks! :)

wow, fantastically alive Thanks very much Barbara!

CaseHardened
10-11-2015, 07:57 PM
One thing I noticed, for some reason my mind sees a paisley pattern in the color piece, and that's really alluring for me. The grayscale one has an organic quality that made it seem very calm to me. Both versions are excellent and intriguing and they say a lot with a whisper rather than a shout. I love them. :)

davefriend
10-11-2015, 08:25 PM
One thing I noticed, for some reason my mind sees a paisley pattern in the color piece, and that's really alluring for me. The grayscale one has an organic quality that made it seem very calm to me. Both versions are excellent and intriguing and they say a lot with a whisper rather than a shout. I love them. :)"they say a lot with a whisper rather than a shout", Very eloquent CaseHardened, I really like that! Thanks!

Gollator
10-12-2015, 04:08 PM
Hard to tell if I am just seeing that now that I read your introduction... yet I agree that this one feels out of balance in comparison to some of your other works (still great!). Hard to tell, as it seems to be in a blind spot when looking at it.

There are many interesting areas to rest, fishes, fluits, and hands mostly. Each of them bring joy once discovered. Yet the image itself urges the viewer to move on... there are so many drifts and tides caused by the many parallel ripples that my eyes go back and forth. On the contrary, the large green ball at 4 o'clock is grabbing quite some intention. There is a horse show shape just above that which is equally nice... but they are isolated larger areas in the overall picture.

IMHO, I'd try to merge some patterns to reduce stress... strenghten some borders on areas of interest.

I think we had this conversation in another thread about moving on or not... restarting the optimization algorithm or otherwise escaping a local maximum which is not necessarily the best the pic can acheive... a pathfinder trying to reach the valley by taking the steepest decent, and then stuck in a (geological) depression a mere 100m from the next town. Set the pathfinder on ecstasy so that he will make some moves even when they will worsen the situation... sometimes I take away what is my dearest section in the painting as I am arranging (forcing) everything else around it... maybe the better path is just behind that hill.

joelaidler101
10-12-2015, 04:40 PM
I like the pattern and love the detail but the colour combination is not doing it for me somehow.

harrymspitz
10-12-2015, 05:20 PM
Way back in the 60s and early 70s we used to find secret images hidden in album covers. Proof that Paul was dead and that Dylan was in a vegetative state after his motorcycle accident.
I find myself revisiting that strange state of mind while searching through your tangled shapes.
There's a whole lot of complex stuff happening here. Very cool.

davefriend
10-18-2015, 06:00 PM
Sorry I haven't replied to these comments earlier. :o

Hard to tell if I am just seeing that now that I read your introduction... yet I agree that this one feels out of balance in comparison to some of your other works (still great!). Hard to tell, as it seems to be in a blind spot when looking at it.

There are many interesting areas to rest, fishes, fluits, and hands mostly. Each of them bring joy once discovered. Yet the image itself urges the viewer to move on... there are so many drifts and tides caused by the many parallel ripples that my eyes go back and forth. On the contrary, the large green ball at 4 o'clock is grabbing quite some intention. There is a horse show shape just above that which is equally nice... but they are isolated larger areas in the overall picture.

IMHO, I'd try to merge some patterns to reduce stress... strenghten some borders on areas of interest.

I think we had this conversation in another thread about moving on or not... restarting the optimization algorithm or otherwise escaping a local maximum which is not necessarily the best the pic can acheive... a pathfinder trying to reach the valley by taking the steepest decent, and then stuck in a (geological) depression a mere 100m from the next town. Set the pathfinder on ecstasy so that he will make some moves even when they will worsen the situation... sometimes I take away what is my dearest section in the painting as I am arranging (forcing) everything else around it... maybe the better path is just behind that hill. Daniel, your comment gave me a lot to think about and I find myself, as an artist, unsatisfied if I leave a work too early. I have looked a artwork without number (both here and in the wild) that I say to my self ..."my artwork looked like that at some stage of it's development" meaning in the process of creating these highly detailed menageries of disconnected fantasy there was an intermediate stage where I could have stopped painting and let it be quite acceptable as it was and it would be considered simpler, looser and more organic.

But I find there is an inner drive to go beyond the point, to keep refining. I always say I can make it better - do more- go on ...and at some point, I have to walk away in order to say it's done. Leonardo da Vinci once said, "Art is never finished, only abandoned." I feel like that all to often but I do come to a point, with some paintings, where I feel it is as good as the others (or almost as good) and I'm happy with that.

With this painting, I feel there is too much even distribution of what the painting is made of and overcoming that is a road longer than I am interested in taking right now. I'm setting it aside till I feel like being Dr. artist who can heal the terrible distresses of this painting - or cure my way of looking at it! :D

I like the pattern and love the detail but the colour combination is not doing it for me somehow. I get that Joe and it is giving me similar vibes.

Way back in the 60s and early 70s we used to find secret images hidden in album covers. Proof that Paul was dead and that Dylan was in a vegetative state after his motorcycle accident.
I find myself revisiting that strange state of mind while searching through your tangled shapes.
There's a whole lot of complex stuff happening here. Very cool.Harry, I love your references back to a time when hand done art work was a badge of distinction for hip and raw bands of the era. The mysteries in the art, either real or manufactured by a culture desperately looking for a meaningful place for their young lives to inhabit. Thanks for the compliments! :)

Gollator
10-19-2015, 07:38 AM
Art is never finished, only abandoned
Hard to argue against Leonardo - esp. since I profoundly admire his scientific thinking.

I think that, back in the days, I would have signed this in agreement (if you extend the meaning of "abandoned" with "signed" and/or "sold"), but after my hiatus, this is no longer my view. Not saying, of course, that I got any wiser.

My two cents: to me, every piece of (my) art is a snapshot on an artistic journey. It is we, the artists, who should never cease to continue and develop. I think that "Love Me Do" would have been considerably different if the Beatles would have finished that in their Sgt. Peppers period, but it's still a great song, and it is good that it was released/abandoned/finished in '62 already.

I am not John Lennon (last time I checked), yet I feel that every other month I would do older paintings differently, and it is fun to redo some of the older versions with a fresh look, but I would not overpaint as the emotional trail soon gets abstract, or passive.

What you describe here is something else... you seem to be engaged in a dialogue with the painting / yourself, which is also incredibly cool and rewarding (happens to me, at most, say, every 10th painting). Maybe there comes a conclusion statement from this dialogue, maybe not. As long as you are happy and/or making progress on the way - perfect.

Cheers!
Daniel "blahbybla"

davefriend
10-19-2015, 09:31 AM
Those snapshots of the artistic journey seem valuable at some point in the future. I don't mean in any art market per se, but as you referenced with the Beatles work they help complete the picture of the artist. It is both painful and joyful to have a personal retrospective every now and then to mark the mile posts of that journeys direction. I have remarked in some previous thread that I am in the habit of keeping my 'Frankensteins' rather than burying them ...although I will admit to getting in an occasional straight where I need a canvas and will gesso over the one I am working on - but not so much the ones I have abandoned!

You are right about the dialog. That is a common occurrence and you don't like to leave conversations hanging ...although sometimes you just run out of things to say even though there is more on your mind. It is not always the time or the place to do so without starting another conversation - if you know what I mean by that?

I am working on a tiny 5"x7" painting that is very satisfying at the moment but it is taking forever to finish. I keep saying I could have made a larger painting in all this time ...but my problem is that the dialog is still very much alive and though I can see the end in sight, it is way longer than I ever thought it would take at the beginning! Art takes time as much as anything else and that retrospective journey shows the minutes of your life like a snapshot, as your said.

Thanks for the additional dialog with a human work of art, Daniel! :D