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Eraethil
09-21-2015, 10:09 PM
All mixed media acrylics on 10"x10" cradled panels. These are texture studies and experiments, and hopefully also stand on their own as works of art.

The mixed includes wood blocks, hardware cloth, reflective industrial glass beads, cast acrylic, cotton thread, tile spaces and shims, and faux fur.

Homage V

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Sep-2015/104815-Homage_V_WEB.jpg

Homage VIII

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Sep-2015/104815-Homage_VIII_WEB.jpg

Homage IX

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Sep-2015/104815-Homage_IX_WEB.jpg

PushingPixels
09-21-2015, 11:27 PM
different, pure assemblage.

it'sALLart
09-22-2015, 07:51 AM
I like the last one, and I usually am not a fan of grid stuff. I think it's the shadows underneath that make it work for me.

Bevahlee
09-22-2015, 08:53 AM
Enjoy these minimalist pieces very much. The shadows which change with the light are what makes these work

birdhs
09-22-2015, 09:01 AM
Industrial Minimalism Abstracts

simply complex
sharp softness
random precision

these are so soothing
they play with your visual perception
stare for aboot
and they begin to come alive
moving
swimming
laffing

loving this

greggo

Eraethil
09-22-2015, 08:21 PM
I'm definitely working in assemblage with these. But treading a different path than most other assemblage artists. The first one, for example, is almost entirely acrylic paint - painted or casted. The only exception is that the hexagonal cast acrylic contains industrial reflective glass beads. I'm trying to use found and manufactured objects in transformed ways so that they become just another texture, rather than appearing as what they are - beads, or wood blocks or cotton thread.

It's great that the shadows were noticed. They were part of the process of creating these works, along with cast and reflected light. It has been a LOT of enjoyable work so far, with a few blah results, as is always the case...

Thanks everyone for the thoughtful comments so far. I'd love to hear any critical thoughts you have about either the individual pieces or the series.
Cheers,

Bevahlee
09-22-2015, 08:50 PM
I just reallly like the subtle variation of whites.

birdhs
09-22-2015, 09:48 PM
When MOMA calls,
be sure to they follow your EXACT directions for museum lighting,
to show these off to their maximum effect.
With Fine Art like this, lighting is paramount.
as it is when taking phots of these,
poor lighting could flatten and dull these out.
or if the High calls, tell them too.
I wish I could see these IRL, and the High is only 2 hours away...

https://www.high.org/

greggo

Eraethil
09-23-2015, 08:23 PM
Thanks again Beverly.

Wouldn't that be a dream greggo! Someday, with many many moons of additional experience... and some serious good luck. LOL

Dee350
09-23-2015, 09:05 PM
Simplicity in whites - great work.

davefriend
09-23-2015, 11:24 PM
When I first looked at these I was thinking you are using builders tiles of some sort. Homage VIII has + shapes in it that looked like tile spacers so that set it more firmly in my mind that these were tiles.

I admire your reach in creativity to use found materials and create design assemblages like these then display and market them as art pieces. I am always curious when one experiments like this what has been the consumer response?

Consumer response for my work is so flat that I seemed to have acquired a good supply of gifts and Christmas presents.

Glad you are having fun with this. My preference in order is: Homage IX / Homage VIII / Homage V.

I like the 3rd photo piece best because of the depth and variation in tone that naturally occurs. Lighting possibilities are unlimited on each of these. Cool stuff Rick! :thumbsup::thumbsup:

Eraethil
09-24-2015, 02:50 AM
Thanks Dee and Dave!

I've only shown 9 of them in one small exhibition this summer and sold just one of them, so I'm not sure of the art collector response as yet. We'll see.

These are texture studies that I hope to combine into groupings that have a strong appeal as fine art rather than simply being decorative. I'm not worrying about success on this front at this point in the process though - early days. It is more important for now to develop an understanding of how textures interact with each other in visual art.

The title of the series is a result of it being an homage to Josef Albers' writings about and experiments/exercises with colour, as well as his series "Homage to the Square". He was exploring how colours interact, where I am trying to piece together how textures interact. It's been a great experiment so far, and has helped a lot with using texture (and relief) in larger works.

I hope a bunch of your Christmas presents (and mine too) get sold before Christmas Dave!

laf.art
09-24-2015, 05:33 AM
I find myself looking at the shadows and admiring them rather than at the pieces as a whole. My fav is 1X

mudar
09-24-2015, 05:38 AM
i love square in art and i love using different materials
so
I feel the responsibility to say what is in my mine about this
Eraethil
i just sow a Geometric forms that can seems at any technological device, mmmm
the most importation for me between this Homage VIII because the cotton random made some break, maybe i belong for a country where technological didn't dominate our mine at this leave

Eraethil
09-24-2015, 05:55 PM
Thanks laf and Mudar!

Mudar, I think I am understanding from your comment that you enjoy the randomness of the faux fur in Homage VIII because it doesn't appear to imply a technological fabrication. And perhaps because there is a trace of the artist's hand in the resulting image? If so, I understand completely.

I like that these pieces seem to be bringing up the subject many abstract artists have wrestled with or had directed at their work over the past century: Is it still fine art?

mudar
09-25-2015, 11:48 AM
Thanks laf and Mudar!

Mudar, I think I am understanding from your comment that you enjoy the randomness of the faux fur in Homage VIII because it doesn't appear to imply a technological fabrication. And perhaps because there is a trace of the artist's hand in the resulting image? If so, I understand completely.

I like that these pieces seem to be bringing up the subject many abstract artists have wrestled with or had directed at their work over the past century: Is it still fine art?
love to unsure your last question but its so difficult !!
at last, i believe that if there is no fine art, there is nothing fine