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Delofasht
07-26-2015, 07:29 PM
It's been a few years since I've seen a tips and tricks thread, and over the years I've learned quite a few new ones that I thought I would share with everyone.

Most I've mentioned in other threads, but oftentimes we as artists are unable to look through every thread and get all the information from them. It's hard to keep up with every post in all the subforums that we may follow here on WC.

First, blending with walnut oil, oils break down wax and oil binders alike, allowing them to be spread very easily to almost watercolor like finishes. The major drawback to the most commonly used oil is the strike through that happens (oil seeps through the paper), account for this by sizing the paper with a glue, PVA or clear Acrylic Gesso work well for this. Several thin coats will effectively stop strike through issues. Colored pencil work tends to be smudgy already, and when you add walnut oil the binder is further reduced and moved around resulting in a nearly powdery finish, so take care to varnish at the end of your work, you wouldn't want it wiped off by accident. This is more so true on prepared paper than on just straight paper, but remember most oils will supposedly destroy the paper eventually (there is a lot of debate about this when we view a few pieces of paper that have been preserved with oils from hundreds of years ago, Koreans. . . I don't know how they do it).

Second, for dry blending of colors try a cheap pH neutral craft foam for kids crafts under your paper. The thinner kind provides a minimal cushion, the thicker kind gives a bit more cushion and feels a bit sturdier. This is very similar to having several sheets of paper under your main paper (or a rubber cutting mat), the difference is that it's slightly softer than rubber cutting mats, and slightly firmer than paper. The result is a lovely soft blending that happens as the tooth of the paper squishes around your pencil as you move it, keeping hard strokes from appearing. I remove this near the end of a sketch or drawing and put it on a hard surface to get crisp sharp lines, but even those can be done on the craft foam.

Here is a picture of the craft foam piece, I've cut it in half to share with my daughter so she can use the same technique I do:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jul-2015/34519-IMG_0909_s.jpeg

Next, remember that how you hold the pencil will make a difference to the kind of strokes and pressure you can exhibit on the lead. I have been doing quite a bit of sketching from life with hand sharpened pencils these past few years. Doing so has resulted in my having a very long tip that is easy to break with normal pressure, but has made my pressure control go amazingly up. I can build up much more quickly with minimal pressure changes, I showed a picture of one of my current grips, I use various grips for a pencil though. Here is a picture of the pencil grip I most commonly use:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jul-2015/34519-IMG_0906_4.jpeg

Combining these two techniques results in this kind of blending, done quickly without fanfare:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jul-2015/34519-IMG_0910_s.jpeg

Adjusting your pencil pressure and angle on the tip with the foam underneath will allow for more or less very tight filling, but for gradients this is one of the smoothest applications I can find. All of 30 seconds of scribbling there, VERY fast, that was done with Prismacolor pencils (because I found nubs the other day and want to get rid of them).

A couple other tips, trying clipping your paper (and foam) down to a board of the right size to give it a bit of weight and the ability to be portable. Being able to spin the entire board quickly to get a different angle on the paper allows for some quick blending. Those cheap office butterfly clips are very handy for this, I bought a bunch at target for a couple dollars (like 20 of them) and they have served a ton of purposes around the house. Blending drawings with paper tortillions (rolled up pieces of paper that taper to a point) are very handy on the craft foam, so give that a try as well, it's better with oil based pencils than wax, as the wax doesn't seem to want to move quite as much.

Lastly, I've found over the years that colored pencils can be used almost haphazardly with strokes without major concern with erasing much. Most of the colors are quite transparent and so can be layered over fairly easy, loosen up a bit with your work, colored pencils do not have to be super tight, hyper realistic works.

If anyone else has some great tips to share feel free to join in on this. Perhaps after awhile we can get these added to one of the older threads that have tons of great tips in them as well.

Olaf
07-26-2015, 07:48 PM
. . loosen up a bit with your work, colored pencils do not have to be super tight, hyper realistic works . .
. . . :thumbsup:

artdude
07-26-2015, 10:30 PM
Very informative post! THANKS Delofasht!! :thumbsup: :clap:

Olaf
07-27-2015, 01:26 PM
The best "tips" I've picked up over the past months is, first, the use of Strathmore smooth paper, and, second, blending with plain ol' mineral spirits.

Can't say enough good about the Bristol smooth paper, 100 lbs., 20 sheets to the pad in 11x14 or 9x12 . . takes my Prismacolor and other pencils wonderfully . . layer upon layer.

Plain ol' mineral spirits blends superbly . . I use a wad of cotton cloth for large areas, a Q-tip or a very fine brush for smaller areas. Colors go down beautifully over the dried, blended area. Very time-saving for underpainting large areas of background.

brownblackandwhite
07-28-2015, 06:20 PM
Thanks for starting this thread Delo.
Lots of new ideas that I had not considered.
Thanks for sharing.

Olaf I have used Bristol Vellum that you mention almost exclusively so I am one of the converted.
And I agree that paper is very influential in terms of results, and should be one of the first decisions for materials.
I think it might even be more important than pencil choice or selection.

Richard

Delofasht
07-29-2015, 12:09 AM
I'm glad to know this thread is being helpful, Richard and artdude. :)

I thought I would share a trick that I'm currently running through some rigorous testing. I recently have been adding a tiny bit of dry marble dust over my colored pencils in some areas to add atmospheric effects. It's a nice way to knock back some areas of a piece into clouds or the background without using white pencil. It also works well with my other techniques and allows for some interesting results. It has a nice way of smoothing out the tooth of an area and giving the pencils a bit of something to grip to on especially smooth areas as well. So if you have burnished too hard wipe a tiny bit of marble dust in and it should recover some tooth for you. :)

Crabby2
07-30-2015, 02:16 PM
As a learner I've been struggling with solvents. Perhaps it's because I use turpenoid. I don't know. But, sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. Some pencils seem to 'melt' much easier than others.

But I have found that a watercolor scrubber brush works wonders. Doesn't damage the paper. Great way to get full coverage when doing light layers. And a great blender. It's a quick, easy way to cheat! 😉😁 You can get a set of three at jerrys artarama for about $5. the really tiny one, size 2, is less than 1/4 inch wide, which is perfect for tiny areas. And if, for some reason you don't like them , they make great cleaning tools for miniscule nooks and crannies.

Thanks for the tips. I have a thin sheet of foam that I'm going to try....

RobinZ
07-30-2015, 04:37 PM
I also prefer to blend with brushes, I use trimmed bristle brushes.

Anyone know of any long term studies of thinners on paper and how the paper holds up?

Pingpongfan
07-30-2015, 04:43 PM
Is marble dust somewhat like chalk? Do you get it from a sculptor or from a hardware store. Lots of reading about it on the Internet. If I was seriously interested, I could spend a lot of time reading what different people have to say about it. Sounds as if it would be a good idea to use a mask when using it. How do you personally use it?
Vena

LilliCC
07-30-2015, 04:46 PM
Wonderful tips! I have been dying to try the Bristol, and now I definitely think I will have to!

I have never used any solvents on my pastels or pastel pencils... I may have to try that as well...

Great ideas!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Olaf
07-30-2015, 04:50 PM
I also prefer to blend with brushes, I use trimmed bristle brushes.

Anyone know of any long term studies of thinners on paper and how the paper holds up?
How is blending with brushes different in effect from blending with a colorless blender?

RobinZ
07-30-2015, 05:48 PM
Colorless blender is wax, and can intensify the colors underneath, also changes the layering. I use a very hard paper (Mi Tientes) and sometimes I can't get more layers on, then I use the colorless blender and can.

I also think since it's so waxy, that it creates more wax bloom in dark colors with prismas, so never use it with darks.

The brush is more to get the little tiny pits in the paper filled.

I use a flat pencil "point" or sides of the pencils to get my first 3 layers on, then brush it, then I can start detailing it.

RobinZ
07-30-2015, 05:51 PM
I should add that the eraser is my best friend in the beginning. I would rather refine with it than with a darker shade of pencil. I use both a white plastic eraser and "typewriter" type sharpenable erasers. Which is another reason I love Mi Tientes, it's tough enough to take erasing. I've ripped holes in Stonehenge, hate it.

I use masonite cut in different sizes for portability. In the summer, I rarely work on colored pencil indoors!!!!!

And I love cps because no matter what your style, tight, loose or in between, it performs beautifully.

Five
07-30-2015, 07:35 PM
Has anyone ever poured from the cans of Mineral Spirits without half of it being wasted?
I have tried in vain to find a pouring spout. You would think that the places that sell the cans, like Lowes, would have them, but no luck.

Delofasht
07-30-2015, 09:35 PM
Is marble dust somewhat like chalk? Do you get it from a sculptor or from a hardware store. Lots of reading about it on the Internet. If I was seriously interested, I could spend a lot of time reading what different people have to say about it. Sounds as if it would be a good idea to use a mask when using it. How do you personally use it?
Vena

Yes, marble dust is like chalk, same chemical composition, slightly different crystalline structure. I buy mine from the art store, normally ordered from Dick Blick, I get the Fredrix Powdered Marble Dust, it is of a very high quality. I normally use a tiny amount and just rub it in with a paper towel, the best kind is paper towel is a very absorbent soft kind, I use Scott's Shop Towels, the blue kind you buy in rolls. It's super handy for rubbing in, you can also use a paper tortillion or a number of other things (including a finger). Indeed as a dust a 'mask' is a good idea, for which I just pull my shirt up over my nose until I have it rubbed in, once absorbed or pushed into the paper surface or wax/oil of the pencil on the paper it's totally safe. The quantity I use at a time is also so low that I do not overly worry about inhaling the dust, it's so minor that it's likely not to negatively affect the body anyhow. Calcium carbonate, which is what marble dust is, will often be used as a filler for medications in pill form, or as an antacid.

There is a huge amount of information about it's uses, and I have used it for many purposes, including polishing wood surfaces. (like pumice, but finer, for this purpose) It's also a filler found in paints, colored pencils, and makes a fine molding paste with acrylics. Hundreds of uses, very economical, and very helpful for achieving a wide range of results.

Delofasht
07-30-2015, 09:43 PM
Has anyone ever poured from the cans of Mineral Spirits without half of it being wasted?
I have tried in vain to find a pouring spout. You would think that the places that sell the cans, like Lowes, would have them, but no luck.

You could try funneling it into glass bottle and then use one of these:

http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/1/3/bottle-pourers

There are a lot of bottle pourers/stoppers that could be used to get small controllable pours. :)

KareBear94
07-30-2015, 11:45 PM
I have been using alcohol as a blender for colored pencil it seems to work pretty well with the Prismacolors... I have allergies and asthma so I have to be careful with other products as blenders... I use either alcohol on a-tips our have also used with a brush...

Here's a picture of a flower where I used this technique...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jul-2015/1970829-Tulip_Center.jpg

The marble dust sounds like a trick to try... Thanks Delo for the suggestion.

Karen :cat:

Delofasht
07-31-2015, 12:18 PM
I saw a trick recently that was amazing, just remembered it. Gouache for fixing your mistakes! Gouache is watercolor with more solids to make it opaque (commonly used is chalk, which is also calcium carbonate, or marble dust). Due to the fact that water tends to warp paper quite a bit this is a bit restricted to certain paper types, or used very carefully.

One other trick I remembered was that of fixing a dented area of paper, if you somehow have a spot that is scratched or depressed hard, you can add a very small amount of water to that spot, let it rise for a couple minutes then blot it dry with a paper towel. After it finishes drying completely (10 to 30 min depending on paper thickness), you should have raised the paper fiber in that spot allowing for color to be applied evenly over it. I can't recall where I saw this trick but it actually works quite well on Bristol (where I first tried it) and Stonehenge and Illustration board.

Lastly, there are a variety of techniques for paper glue to a panel of some kind. These kinds of boards provide a very stable surface that is very resistant to warping from water washes. Some watercolorists paint on such surfaces to wonderful effect, and it works equally well for colored pencil work. The surface you are gluing the paper to will change how the pencil is accepted into the paper, so if you are doing this on wood smooth the wood first by sanding it. It should still have some tooth to the wood panel when you glue the paper though so it adheres well. Making your own paper covered surfaces is a great way to produce stable working surfaces that will not warp or bend with pressure on the pencil as well. You can still manage to scuff or scrape through the paper though, if you do you can use a bit of calcium carbonate paste (acrylic or oil mixed with chalk or marble dust) to fill in holes, make it even with your paper surface and then draw over that.

As I continue to think of tricks I've used over the years for a variety of surfaces I'll add them here. If you have any questions as to any tricks on a specific surface or approach feel free to ask, I'm sure someone here has an idea for something they have used over the years that might be useful. :)

Pingpongfan
07-31-2015, 01:52 PM
Five, the spout is at the "front" of the can, so the natural tendency is to pour towards the front. But, if you hold whatever you are going to pour into at the back of the spout and pour backwards, then you should be able to pour without messing. You can also try holding the can sideways and pour out of the side of the spout, but backwards works better. Hope this makes sense.
Vena

Delofasht
07-31-2015, 03:29 PM
Another tip for getting into colored pencils:

Choose your colors with reason. We are presented a HUGE range of colors, various vibrancy, effects and so on and so forth, but for a basic palette I strongly suggest keeping it simple. The reason for this is to learn just how much mixing and color blending you can do with just a few versatile colors. This also encourages deeply understanding the few pencils, as you become more aware of the inherent properties of certain colors you will notice subtle differences in transparency, opacity, handling qualities such as lay down, grittiness or smoothness, etc.

My go to basic color palette (all Faber Castell Polychromos):

Dark Naples Ochre
Cobalt Turqouise
Magenta
Middle Cadmium Red
Cadmium Yellow Lemon
Prussian Blue
Ivory
Warm Grey VI

These 8 colors all blend extremely well together, produce a HUGE gamut of possible colors, and provide nearly everything one might need. If used with my little calcium carbonate tricks you can create a near unlimited range of colors. I veer slightly away from some of the higher chroma colors like Deep Scarlet Red and the like only because I feel it can be really hard to control extremely vibrant colors as a beginner, easier to add that later if you desire. I avoid black because like the vibrant reds and blues they can overpower other blends very quickly.

Now these colors are the what, but even more important I think, is WHY.

Dark Naples Ochre is a yellow that is warm leaning and has a wonderful range of hues. It goes from a middle warm yellow tone all the way to a light warm yellow very easily.

Cobalt Turquoise is nearly a phthalo blue in properties (albeit much lighter than a true phthalo blue), it's a slightly green leaning blue, which actually makes it closer to a primary blue in color spectrum. (meaning cyan) This means it will mix well with magenta to make what we consider a true blue, it also mixes well with yellows to get good greens.

Magenta is very close to a true magenta as well, I assume it must be a quinacridone based pigment as it's color matches up very well with the Quinacridone Rose or Red of various oil paints in color. It allows for wonderful shifts in color from purples to cool/warm reds.

Example of these three used for blending (single layers of color blue as the base color other 2 added on either side):

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Jul-2015/34519-IMG_0917_s.jpg

I recently posted this in another thread, but wanted it repeated here because the tips and tricks thread could become quite useful as a resource for newer colored pencil artists eventually.

Continuing on with the explanation of the colors in my palette:

Middle Cadmium Red is just like a normal Cad red in oil paints, it provides an orange leaning red (this is sometimes thought of as warmer). It blends well with yellow to make a variety of oranges, and when mixed with cobalt turquoise will give you some very interesting neutrals (some of my favorites).

Cadmium Yellow Lemon is the cooler version of the yellows that I like, it's very vibrant, but gets overpowered by other colors very easily, yet it is very good at cooling off something that feels a touch too warm.

Lastly, Prussian Blue is secretly my favorite color in any spectrum of colors ever. This is actually not like a true prussian blue though, as a true prussian leans slightly greenish in undertone, while this one is definitely more reddish. This is actually a HUGE benefit for my colored pencil palette however, as this allows for a HUGE range of wonderful purples and muted greens when mixed with red/magenta, or either of the yellows respectively. This is my second favorite blue in Polychromos, cobalt turquoise is generally slightly more versatile. This is almost a convenience color really, as you can make a warmer blue by Magenta/Cobalt Turquoise mix as shown in the picture, but oh my. . . it's such a lovely blue. It's just the perfect fit for so many uses.

The other 2 colors I tend to think of more as non colors, Ivory and Warm Grey VI provide an excellent way of tinting or shading your colors. Ivory actually leans slightly warm, where normally white is slightly cool leaning in general, I pick this color because most papers tend to be bleached to a very cool white color. Using the paper color with this white allows for subtle shifts in dimension without resorting to adjusting values in a painting. (yes I call colored pencil drawings as paintings. . . because that is how I approach them, mostly tonally and in shapes rather than lines) Warm Grey VI is my replacement for Payne's Grey, mostly because I have always owned Warm Grey VI instead, either could really be used, but I find the Warm Grey a bit darker. I like to use Prussian to cool my Grey if I need it darker, the combination makes a look of a near black very often.

This palette is generally viewed as a split complementary palette, but it's actually more of a true primary, warm leaning split mix. It's one that took me a long time to make, as I found that all the colors of Polychromos so delicious that it was really hard to refine it down to what was most important. One immediately notices a lack of greens, browns, and purples; this is simply because almost every possible shade of those can be mixed from some combination of the colors in this palette. I strongly suggest adding to the palette as you progress with colors of your choice, depending on your subject matter.

I personally paint a lot of landscapes and pet portaits, so I have found myself using a wide variety of greens, browns, and grays for a long time. More recently with my uses of calcium carbonate I've been using more blending to achieve results, but sometimes you just need to pull good brown lines (wood, fur, etc)

I hope this tip can help the newer colored pencil painter to get comfortable with an easy to use palette that provides a huge range of potential. :)

RobinZ
07-31-2015, 09:42 PM
I keep it simple and use colors that match whatever I'm coloring UNLESS I can't get the shade without blending. It's just too time consuming to me to mix colors up with colored pencil. Of course, with oil paints, it's much easier and faster, plus having tons of tubes around is expensive, so mixing up is economical, too!

I have tons of pencils, and that's fine with me. Some I use ALL THE TIME and others, I still have from my first set 12 years ago!

Isn't it wonderful how there's not "right way" to use colored pencils?

YemasseeLovesColor
07-31-2015, 09:58 PM
Has anyone ever poured from the cans of Mineral Spirits without half of it being wasted?
I have tried in vain to find a pouring spout. You would think that the places that sell the cans, like Lowes, would have them, but no luck.


Try either restaurant supply or auto parts stores.... both have versions of pour spouts for quart and gallon containers of oil and other fluids.

Delofasht
08-01-2015, 01:19 AM
Isn't it wonderful how there's not "right way" to use colored pencils?


I love how there is no "right way" for almost anything in art. I used to like getting more and more colors, and I use them when I'm picking a palette for a subject matter.

In fact, that's a tip that might be worth noting, picking a color palette for a piece, is largely about resolving what the major colors are for your subject. For this, taking a picture into MS Paint or Preview on a Mac and adjusting the size down to like 4 pixels by 4 pixels will give you a solid 16 colors that is a good start for the palette. Then just match those as best you can, sometimes you will see a color several times in an image using this method, I leave those out and tend to pick colors that are a touch more vivid than what may be shown. I normally end up with about 8 to 12 colors and oftentimes several of my basic palette show up in that selection of colors. :)

All that said, the basic palette really helps with understanding the color space, and how to neutralize colors that might be too vivid, and use very little to get a lot. I used to feel blending with colored pencils to be slow, but not anymore, I'm getting almost as fast as I am with oil paints as mixing colors and achieving the results I want.

A little off topic, I recently bought an assorted set of Cretacolor leads for use with my lead holder, promptly fell in love with these thick leads for sketching. Among them was a white chalk lead, upon using it a sudden realization of how familiar it felt struck me. I can't say for certain, but I feel very confident in saying it is a mixture of some white pigment, chalk, and a binder, given the slight scratchiness of it. . . probably kaolin. Makes me want to try to make one with my marble dust, because a solids form of my blending powder would be awesome! I'll try that in a few days and get back to everyone, literally just came up with an entire method for doing this, if it works I'll share the recipe for everyone.

Delofasht
08-01-2015, 10:54 AM
Oh another one I thought I should add here, something that often we observe but aren't really aware of on a more conscious level. Colored pencils are generally semi transparent, meaning that some of the light passes through the layer of color.

This sounds simple enough on the surface level, but when blending and mixing colors one starts to encounter some tricky aspects to this. Even on just a white surface we sometimes lay in a color thinking we are going to get one thing and because of the semi transparency we actually perceive a slightly lighter color. This is both a good quality and a bad one, depending on one's taste in colors. To further confuse this, some colors tend to be rather more opaque than others and we are hard pressed to tell the differences between which is which. Color names do not often give us information as to which pigment is in a pencil, even if they did, many of us are not familiar with different pigment handling qualities.

Here's the real tip though, toothier surfaces allow for richer color build up. One has deeper tooth for the color to fill in and allows for color blends like one would get with transparent colors in oil painting. This has a double benefit for colored pencil users, as this tooth will allow for both more layers of color and for building up richer color overall. Smoother surfaces will generally result in a slightly more washed out appearance to colors applied. This is where solvents helps in spades, dissolving the binder allows the pigment from pencils to seep into the paper fibers (certain colors are particularly staining), allowing for increased coverage and additional layers of color on smoother papers.

Crabby2
08-01-2015, 01:44 PM
Delo. Thanks for the last comment about toothier papers. I have trouble with bristol vellum. It seems so insipid. Then I get frustrated and press harder. I'm going to try it with solvent again. (It also scratches so easily! Yuck!)

I finally realized what I like to do is make colors. I can't draw worth a damn, but I love making colors. I'm like a four year old. I like to see how different colors blend, etc. And how different brands work. Good thing I didn't take up chemistry as a hobby. I'd have blown up our house by now!!

Thanks for this thread. I like these conversations....

Delofasht
08-01-2015, 03:08 PM
I finally realized what I like to do is make colors. I can't draw worth a damn, but I love making colors. I'm like a four year old. I like to see how different colors blend, etc. And how different brands work. Good thing I didn't take up chemistry as a hobby. I'd have blown up our house by now!!

Drawing is hard, it's all sorts of visual measuring done so quickly and then transposed to line. I'm linearly challenged. . . so I tend to try to visual a shape that I need to trace, or I literally scribble in the shape and trace the correct outside edge (adjusting the edge as needed to create the line). Understanding what line actually represents helped me a lot too, but it is still harder than thinking in blocks of tone for me.

Making color is one of my favorite aspects of painting, that's why I mix colors more often than not. Also, I find mixed colors more interesting to look at then color straight from the pencil (or tube). Colors that have other colors shimmering through in random areas are fun, and almost seem to vibrate somehow.

RobinZ
08-01-2015, 06:09 PM
That's great you enjoy that, Del. I'd rather just grab a color I need than "mix" it. The beauty of colored pencil is that the transparency means you can use pressure and/or glazing to change a shade, blend it by any method you like, and get a nice piece.

I don't use toothy paper, I don't use 3 colors to make a shade when there's a pencil of that shade, I don't use solvents and I don't think my work looks washed out. I don't need a computer program to figure out what color I need, either.

You make colored pencil seem difficult, frankly.

There are many methods in this medium, many choices, and none are superior to others, they are just different. :thumbsup:

Delofasht
08-01-2015, 06:47 PM
That's great you enjoy that, Del. I'd rather just grab a color I need than "mix" it. The beauty of colored pencil is that the transparency means you can use pressure and/or glazing to change a shade, blend it by any method you like, and get a nice piece.

I don't use toothy paper, I don't use 3 colors to make a shade when there's a pencil of that shade, I don't use solvents and I don't think my work looks washed out. I don't need a computer program to figure out what color I need, either.

You make colored pencil seem difficult, frankly.

There are many methods in this medium, many choices, and none are superior to others, they are just different. :thumbsup:

Oops, really didn't mean to make colored pencils seem difficult, quite the opposite in fact, hoped to give people tools to make it even easier.

I thought you used Mi Tientes, which I consider to have some good tooth to it. Bristol on the other hand I consider to not have much tooth at all, same for most other plate finish papers. With a decent tooth good color saturation is pretty easy, with papers more like Bristol it's more difficult to get that same level of saturation. (not impossible though)

Completely agree that the variety of options available to colored pencil artists is huge. No one way is right, only the way that work for you. :thumbsup:

It should be noted that I don't use all the techniques listed in this thread all the time, but many are part of my toolkit that I can pull out and use when I need them. Most of the time I'm just like everyone else, hunched over a table scribbling away with a pencil in hand. :)

Further, I'd like to thank everyone who has ever shared their knowledge on these forums. I spent a huge number of sleepless nights reading and learning from everything here, without which I couldn't share what I hope to be useful knowledge with others. Truly, without this community I would never have learned to be the artist I am today. (though I would still talk just as much. . . :lol: I know I'm longwinded)

Sydney214
08-01-2015, 07:15 PM
It really is each to their own isn't it. Last year I would never have considered mixing colours in coloured pencil. I thought you either have the colour or you don't. Now I like to do a bit of both depending on the effect I want or sometimes just how I feel. Essentially I do what I want, sometimes trying out techniques from books, magazines or on here and sometimes just playing.

Thank you for starting this thread Delo, it has been an interesting read so far.

Delofasht
08-03-2015, 12:10 PM
Sydney: I'm glad to know it's being found interesting by some at least :)

Another tip I thought of while responding to another thread, make your reference work for you and not the other way around. We often get caught up with copying, but so much about what we do as artists is more about saying something. If we are copying then we are merely telling the story as the camera caught it, but if we decide to put emphasis on a value change here or there, or a color palette, or any number of things; we are making decisions, and those decisions are what we want people to see, not just how well rendered out everything is. It is the beauty of art. My opinion aside, the tip about being the master of your reference still remains, also it's very liberating.

Colored pencil has a tendency to encourage us to focus on the details, but try working the big picture first, and get those details in later. The form of an object is actually more important than the number of freckles or eyelashes, or exact pattern of an apple. Any of those things, if changed, will not break your image, but mess up the form and we suddenly the subject loses it's sense of realism. This can be a useful trait if we want to remove interest on certain things or make them flat though, so understand what and why you are rendering a form, and what details are important to you. This links back into the mastering of the reference, dominating it with your force of will.

I like to say "What we do is at least as important as why we do it."

As for a more practical applicable tip, if you find yourself having some troubles with values in a drawing or painting, try starting by blocking in all the halftones lightly. I've been watching a few artists recently who do just this, as opposed to what I'd learned from books and videos in years past. The reason for doing so is that it allows the eye to quickly assess how much darker or lighter things are in relation to the the base value. It removes the guesswork from getting the right halftones and midtones later. For inputting light back into the subject, one can use a kneadable eraser to pull out the light areas and then fill that in with some lighter colors.

Example: Steve Carpenter (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwiQGCLlXqk)

He is using charcoal and graphite to do this, but the ideas still remain and are very applicable to colored pencil work.

Olaf
08-03-2015, 03:22 PM
. . make your reference work for you and not the other way around. We often get caught up with copying, but so much about what we do as artists is more about saying something. If we are copying then we are merely telling the story as the camera caught it, but if we decide to put emphasis on a value change here or there, or a color palette, or any number of things; we are making decisions, and those decisions are what we want people to see, not just how well rendered out everything is. It is the beauty of art. My opinion aside, the tip about being the master of your reference still remains, also it's very liberating. . .

Colored pencil has a tendency to encourage us to focus on the details, but try working the big picture first, and get those details in later. The form of an object is actually more important than the number of freckles or eyelashes, or exact pattern of an apple. . .
Couldn't agree more . .

. . while I admire and am in awe of the abilities of some, I can't help but wonder why . . the camera already did that.

Have seen WIP posts of someone totally rendering a face one square millimeter at a time . . cannot figure out how they do that and can even less figure out why . . it is perfectly obvious they are copying a photo one tiny bit at a time.

When I do a face, i lay in two broad color masses . . light and mid-tones . . the whole face at once . . from there to the darkest darks . . and then mess with the mid-tones back to light. I like working from b&w photos . . not tempted to try and imitate color . . color is my choice . .

But to each his own . . different strokes, and all that.

Crabby2
08-03-2015, 08:43 PM
I agree with the above regarding photo copies. I love Matisse. And I love Constable. Entirely different but how can someone make an empty room or an empty landscape fascinating? I sure wouldn't care to see a photo of those subjects!

I'm just learning so I still try to see if I can draw anything recognizable.

But this thread has inspired me to try something new. I'm using new Irojiten s only on Bristol vellum which I've never liked. The Iros seem too transparent and I can barely get more than two light layers on. I thought I would try to avoid mixing my own colors and use the pure Iro colors. So far everything, even the darkest colors look like pastels. Maybe it's the paper. But I'm going to soldier on for a while and see what happens. I planned to do something weird and it sure is!

Delo. I had a sheet of foam rubber and used it under the background. I like that technique. Thanks. I then used turpenoid on it (with a Qtip) but it didn't do much. It usually intensifies the colors. Maybe it's the lead. Well, I love to experiment.

Delofasht
08-04-2015, 02:51 AM
The Iros seem too transparent and I can barely get more than two light layers on. . .
Maybe it's the paper. . .
. . . I had a sheet of foam rubber and used it under the background. I like that technique.

I'm really glad someone got to try the foam rubber technique, I was super excited when I tried it for the first time. Now I can't imagine how I ever did some work without it, as it made filling in large areas smoothly so much faster and more simple.

As for your transparent leads, every brand seems different. It is interesting to learn of the qualities of that brand, smooth papers do indeed tend to make transparent colors harder to get good darks built up. Try a paper with a bit more tooth maybe, like Mi Tientes, Stonehenge, or Arches.

Actually this brings up a good tip, if buying papers for colored pencils aim for big sheets of paper and cut them down to size. Pads tend to be made slightly differently and end up with a different surface texture, feel, and handling properties. I found this out when I started testing papers years ago but forgot to mention it anywhere.

Which leads into another tip, for an entirely different feel for using colored pencils, try a sanded paper or surface like Wallis's sanded paper, Fisher 400 Art Paper, UArt or otherwise. The sanded papers can get rather expensive, so if you can find a sample or small size to try first I would strongly suggest doing so. In addition to papers you can find some boards like Ampersand Pastelbord, Colourfix, or even Mi Tientes boards. The boards can range in feel from hard and dry to soft and pliable, depending on brand and material composition. I've played with all kinds of sanded surfaces and come to see their strengths and weaknesses in each. I like Ampersand boards as they feel very stable and are fun and fast to work on. All these sanded surfaces are rather abrasive, and will "eat" your pencils, I actually do not bother sharpening my pencils because of this, and use the tooth of these boards to get points for me to do details later in the painting. This helps me with staying loose, painterly, and suggestive until later in the process. (more difficult to get caught up in details with a blunt tip)

One final tip I thought I'd mention for now, I've recently been using Scott's Shop Towels in other painting media (and drawing), and for blending in colored pencils they can work very well on smooth papers. Being able to wrap a piece of soft paper towel around the finger and just wipe color around is both fun and easy, while also providing some nice smooth results. This is similar to the idea of dry brushing pigment around that is sometimes done as well, but in a slightly less controlled manner, very handy for once again another way of filling in large areas quickly without resorting to endless circle motions with a very pointy tip. The reason I suggest this particular brand is because Viva paper towels were reformulated and have a much more abrasive feel now than they used to. Scott's Shop Towels (the blue kind) have a very similar feel and weave to the old Vivas at a slightly higher price point. They perform extremely well, and if they get clogged with color just wash them out and let them dry and reuse them. My house is actually littered with drying towels on racks, hanging on chairs, over spigots, flat on tables. . . I use these towels for everything, they last for ages.

Sutra
08-05-2015, 12:08 PM
Delofasht - thanks for starting this thread.

One use for the limited palette is to thoroughly test different brands of pencils before buying a complete set.

I personally prefer to work with a lot of colors, so I have a full set of prismas in class, and FC polys and Albrecht Durers at home, and Luminance on the way. I still prefer the look of blended colors because I think it adds depth and a glowing quality to the work. I pick a close color and then add additional colors to round out the final color. I'm not using solvent but supposedly several colors blended together achieves a different result than one color applied thickly. To my mind it's not a matter of making CP difficult, but the way to get the result I want. It's useful to experiment with different approaches because solid colors work very well for some people, just not for me.

KLP1480
08-05-2015, 07:27 PM
Here's a cheap pencil extender ror those that use Prismacolor pencils: Prismas fit perfectly into larger white and red drinking straws. (I use the ones from Wendy's most often). When the pencil is down to half, I add about 1/3 length of straw and put a little tape around it to secure it to the pencil for sharpening. I continue using until I hit the straw with my sharpener, then I snip off the straw, toss the little nub, and put it on another pencil.

Crabby2
08-05-2015, 08:22 PM
Kathy, Pretty cool idea. Next time I go for a burger ill think of you. 😊

Delofasht
08-05-2015, 11:09 PM
Here's a cheap pencil extender ror those that use Prismacolor pencils: Prismas fit perfectly into larger white and red drinking straws. (I use the ones from Wendy's most often). When the pencil is down to half, I add about 1/3 length of straw and put a little tape around it to secure it to the pencil for sharpening. I continue using until I hit the straw with my sharpener, then I snip off the straw, toss the little nub, and put it on another pencil.

To give that straw a bit of firmness and weight you could fill it with rolled up paper to make it a bit heavier. Very handy for people like me that hold that pencil way back like a brush :).

Last year or the one before I made bamboo lead holders, drilling a hole in some bamboo, stripping a pencil of the lead and shoving that in there (slice down the sides of the holder to make a clutch and close it with a rubber band). When the lead gets too small for even the lead holder to hold anymore I grind it up and put in a tiny little jar, I can then dip a piece of Scott's Shop Towel into this pile of colored pencil pigment and wipe it around for some wonderful effects. Very useful for knocking back the white of the paper or surface.

Colored Pencil ground to dust turns into a very interesting paint as well, the smallest amount of oil will turn it into a very thick paste, work it with a palette knife to turn it into a paint. This paint can be used exactly like you would use oil paint, though it's exact qualities for tinting purposes and otherwise will vary greatly depending on the lead ground up. It can also be wiped into more abrasive or otherwise sized papers to allow for a nice toning of the surface.

I've made a picture of the lead bits I have left from a broken Cream Polychromos, ground up a bit of it and turn it into a paint. Also attached is a small pile of a putty medium I've made with the smallest addition of a blue (don't know which one, it was left on my palette, could have been a mix of something even, whatever though still good medium, plan to add color to it at some point anyhow :)). I use this kind of putty medium in oil painting, can be used as a VERY mild white/gray, but it is nearly transparent when it dries. The putty itself is made up of oil and calcium carbonate (marble dust), I have spoke about it quite a bit over on the oil painting forums if you'd like more information about it, though it is admittedly more of a painterly thing than for colored pencils. I use tricks from most other mediums here with colored pencils too though, as the putty dries to a nice gritty film that can be very useful to color over with a pencil. It is a nice way of getting tooth back in a tiny area if you have managed to destroy it through burnishing, the oil in the putty will dissolve and fuse the colors under the putty to it, creating a very stable film that will take new layers of pencil (not too many more layers, maybe 3 to 5, but still more than if we didn't make a "patch").

Cream Polychromos:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Aug-2015/34519-IMG_0926_s.jpg

Putty Medium:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Aug-2015/34519-IMG_0927_s.jpg

nena1971
08-06-2015, 02:50 AM
Thank you for the tips/tricks! I have been having trouble using the strath more vellum paper causing hard places or like if I'm using the lightest of touch it's like in some places I over did it. Or there will be blank places almost like where the paper didn't take the color. I don't have a craft board and it will be a while before I'm able to get any due to having major foot surgery and being out of work. Does anyone have any suggestions about what else to use instead of the craft board?
I have been using the smooth side of the vellum paper. It works pretty good except for what I mentioned above. My drawing will look blotchy....any suggestions on how to help out with that? I do have alcohol that I have tried to break down the wax but the paper does not like it very much.
Thanks again for the great tips!!!!!

Delofasht
08-06-2015, 09:29 AM
Try a stack of paper under your paper, it will add a cushion but it will not provide quite as smooth a grain pick up. As to resolving the burnished areas, solvents are normally the best choice, but you could try hitting it up with some workable fixative, that should add some tooth as well. You could make a modelling paste with chalk/marble dust and clear acrylic medium if you have them. I find that just rubbing something very minorly abrasove over the burnished area can allow for extra layers of color as well. It large depends on whether you are teying to keep the layer of color or not though, it is pretty easy to make ways of scuffing and removing color to add more, but for keeping what is there and putting more on top, it is generally just solvent or fixative for a bit more tooth.

Lastly, there was an artist I used to follow who would take a piece of parchment paper and put it over her colored pencil work and use an iron set to just warm enough to melt wax. Melting the wax into the paper may recover some tooth, or it may remove some of the wax onto the parchment paper (and likely some of the color too) but I cannot say for sure. I followed her work but wasn't as interested in the process because I don't own an iron. Logically it should work though, and parchment paper is meant for baking because it transfer heat and doesn't catch fire easily, thus making it good to press an iron over (and not get wax stuck on the iron).

Good luck in your endeavor, and speedy recovery to your foot. It is always disappointing to be forced off one's feet for extended periods of time.

nena1971
08-06-2015, 10:08 AM
Thank you Delo! I will give the stacks of paper a try! I have some art books that are not hardback that I thought I would try to see if that would work like stacks of paper. I will have to see what kind of solvents I have besides alcohol.

It's been a long time since I've done any art work but being down for a bit will give you ideas lol.

Thank you for the well wishes.

Delofasht
08-06-2015, 04:04 PM
You are most welcome nena.

A while back I started doing something a bit backwards, because I paint (with colored pencils) on rigid supports that have been prepared and are usable for oil paints and other things like that, I have been applying a very thin layer of oil to the board before painting into that. It's giving a similar effect to painting into a wet paper with watercolor pencils, blending is just about pushing the pigment around with finger or paper towel (or other blending instrument). This has been a very interesting little effect, once again with a drying oil (nondrying oils can make for some difficult blending later on, or clumping of color particles). The boards or prepared "chalk" (actually marble dust) gesso absorbs the oil, then I wipe away any excess, then just start working my colors in and rub it around as needed to blend. This really makes it feel like painting and creates the most subtle blending of color I've ever used.

I saved this trick for later to share because it requires a greater understanding of the materials I've presented earlier. It does not do well on surfaces that are not adequately prepared (some sort of sizing to the paper or board, and preferably an absorbent ground on top of that), and requires a different approach to coloring and more supplies than just a piece of paper and some pencils (and a craft foam). The supplies cost a bit more and it is a bit more time consuming to prepare and get used to doing, but WOW. Here's a blend on a new experimental board I've been working with (trying to utilize the grain and color of the wood on these boards):

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Aug-2015/34519-IMG_0928_s.jpg

In this image we can see where I have dripped oil onto the surface and let it sink in, then wiped away the excess (spread it over to other parts of the surface). Then I have added 3 colors in succession, prussian blue, middle cad red, and dark naples ochre, sometimes wiping with my finger between colors to smudge them one into the next, sometimes just putting them on top of each other and just wiping them in. This is a new experiment on this board here as I normally add white to my grounds but this time it's just a mix of glue and marble dust. On the left side of the image we can see an area where it looks like it has been erased some, that's because it has, with a white rubber eraser. You can also see where I did not wipe with my finger to see what the color looked like prior to wiping. The yellow doesn't show up extremely well because of the color of the wood, but it's present and will definitely change the color of anything laid over it.

Here is a picture of coloring first then dissolving with oil and then reapplying some more color on top of that, the color vibrancy is really pronounced:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Aug-2015/34519-IMG_0929_s.jpg

At the top most left corner here we can see a little bit of Ivory done over the blended colors, this has resulted in a very nice little hint of color shift there.

As to my board here, it's just a sheathing plywood (3-ply hardwood) bought from Home Depot and sized with gelatin glue (one part knox gelatin to 3 parts water), then prepared with marble dust gesso (made from adding marble dust to the remainder of the gelatin glue). I brushed the gesso on haphazardly with the intent of leaving some strokes, I applied 2 layers of the glue allowing around 30 minutes of drying time between layers (and doing front and back of the panel as well as the thin little sides to completely seal the wood), then I applied 3 layers of the gesso (because I ran out. . . I would have done 4 or 5 coats of this gesso). When oil is added to my marble dust gesso it gets soaked up into the surface (because of the marble dust) and the marble dust turns transparent, allowing the color of the wood to show through. The reason for the marble dust is that absorption, it allows me for painting with oils in a way that I normally can't on acrylic grounds (most don't have enough solids to cause the amount of absorption I like), it also allows for the amount of tooth to allow for anywhere from 5 to 10 layers of colored pencil directly (without adding oil). When using oil I'm able to blend colors nearly indefinitely, layer a bunch if needed, and do all sorts of things I just normally couldn't with colored pencils.

So, if you want to give this a try, there are pretty much all the instructions and steps I took to make this surface. If you would like to get a whiter surface to start add some white pigment (or paint) to your gesso to make for a perfectly white surface.

This method of oiling the surface first came in part from the watercolor techniques I'd seen over the years and working in oils where oiling oil the surface is sometimes done to create a slicker more mobile surface for color to spread around on. I had long tried to find a way to apply it to colored pencils and I'm truly excited to share the results of this technique, it's something that pretty much changed everything for me when it came to colored pencils. They are basically solid oil color sticks for me now. :)

nena1971
08-06-2015, 06:01 PM
That is something I will have to try one day! I've worked with watercolor pencils before and I really love them. I've been dabbling in art since 2002 when I was down for back surgery. I had never drawn or anything before that time. I love to work on my art but unfortunately I got away from it. It is soothing and helps to wind me down at nite when I get off work.
I found a shopping book from cabelas that my husband gets and started using that today and it is working pretty good so far. I am using the Derwent Graphitint 12 pencils. I bought them about 2 yrs ago and have never used them.
And this may be a stupid question....will most of the colored pencils tell yu if they are wax or oil based? I have a whole collection of Primsacolor.
Thank you Delo for the tips again and for your technique above! That looks like it would be fun to paint on. I hope that you will post a beautiful picture you have done that way.

Delofasht
08-06-2015, 06:56 PM
Most colored pencils are wax based, only a few are actually oil based. Here's the trick though, the oil dissolution will work on wax based pencils too, but it's not as complete as with oil based pencils. The wax will still clog the tooth a bit more than the oil versions will.

Here is a picture of prismacolor pencils on the oil "couch" panel:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Aug-2015/34519-IMG_0936_s.jpg

You might notice it looks and reacts pretty much the same way, using the pencils though "feels" different, it's a definite difference in tactile response. Prismas are wax based, as are most Derwent, the Graphitint are graphite mixed with colored pigment instead and I don't believe they use wax in that, perhaps some clay though.

I love doing art for both relaxation and for work actually, it's funny because I get off work (painting something for someone else) and can't wait to get to just sketch something for myself. (usually a still life of some kind)

nena1971
08-06-2015, 07:51 PM
That's great looking! Really smooth! Yea I figured most were wax based thank you again for answering all my crazy questions!

brissie
08-10-2015, 09:14 AM
Wow what an amazing amount of hints and tips. I've so enjoyed reading them and when on my computer tomorrow I will have to save lots of them into word so I can print them out for future reference.
I'm just starting to experiment with the OMS and my polychromus and Pablo plus luminance pencil ( hate the quality of prisma now) and I find that it certainly changes the vibrancy of the colours. So testing beforehand is a must. I have also found for me the best tool for blending the layers has been the
" smooshing brush".
Masses to learn and have so much fun with. Thanks for taking the time to share all this with us 😊😊

Delofasht
08-10-2015, 12:32 PM
You are most welcome Brissie, it's nice to have a place to put all these little tips and tricks into one spot for easy reference.

Delofasht
08-10-2015, 03:22 PM
Tip on creating good blacks. Often as colored pencil users we tend to use the right pencil for the right job, but then we get to black, and find it hard to achieve a good coverage or depth of black that we need. It often ends up being more gray than we intend, as a solution to this one can try layering dark red, blue, and green to achieve a richer dark. The idea here is for the layers of colors to absorb all the colors of light leaving no color to reflect back, thus appearing black.

You can also layer these colors under or over black to further push that depth of color and are more likely to achieve the look one often seeks when trying to make a black. Solvents used with this method an also produce a VERY dark dark dark black. Lastly, the tooth of the surface can further enhance the appearance of black, it is quite difficult to get a good dark black on a very smooth surface, as the paper tooth will only accept so much pigment (even dissolved). Thus toothier surfaces often will allow for a much richer saturation of color.

nena1971
08-11-2015, 12:50 AM
What kind or brand of paper does everyone like to use?

antidotepictures
08-11-2015, 03:40 AM
Hi everyone, very new to CP but found this thread quite by chance - it's SO amazingly helpful!
antidotepictures

Delofasht
08-20-2015, 03:08 PM
nena, I like most kinds of paper it is more of a matter for what purpose. Sketching is most any kind of paper, for more finished work I really like Stonehenge by the sheet (not the pads). This of course only applies to paper, my preferred surface is either Pastelbord (for professional work) or homemade panels with a custom chalk gesso.

There are a ton of excellent hot pressed watercolor papers, most anything 120lb to 250gsm or over is simply fantastic to work on. Fabriano, Arches, Canson, Strathmore, and so on, all good.

antidotepictures, I am thrilled that this thread is proving useful to someone. I had long meant to share my growing list of tips and tricks, really just different tools for different purposes. It is good to know they might be useful to others.

In fact, after some time of messing around my craft foam shading technique, I realized that I had not been using craft foam to it's full potential. We often buy very specific tools for blending, and in doing so generally find ourselves having to adjust to the edges that tool provides. I have started making my own blending tools out of craft foam. Pictured here is a small rectangular piece I have been using one edge of to do some blending on dry layers, this also works well for use with solvent, the foam soaks it up and allows for very even distribution of it without leaving brushstrokes behind. It requires practically no pressure to smooth colors, it blends areas together, and it cleans out with water (soap too if you used a solvent).

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Aug-2015/34519-IMG_0945_s.jpg

Delofasht
08-30-2015, 07:16 PM
I recently mentioned using rhythm lines in ones works to connect various elements of a work to another area. As an example I thought I would show this in a figure (as those are sometimes difficult to do but easier to see rhythm lines in for me), so this drawing is from my sketchbook, actually just done in graphite, and completely from imagination. . . yes I'd been watching Star Wars recently. . . Return of the Jedi is the best. I don't think there was an image like this position in the movie but the outfit struck me and I found myself mindlessly scribbling away.

I have shown a few rhythm lines that go through the form, the line itself actually disappears as we can see from the second image, but the feel of the line flows through the form and connects one part of the work to another.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2015/34519-Rhythmlines.jpeg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2015/34519-OYK.jpeg

I apologize that it's from my sketchbook and thus pretty small (I rarely draw much larger than 2 or 3 inches by 3 or 4 in size) as such when shown here it's a bit larger than in my sketchbook but I thought that might also make the lines easier to see. This is a tip for connecting the works and doesn't always have to be so literal with referring to lines, it could just be sharp value contrasts, as might be seen in a landscape of a mountain range, where a "line" is created by the edge of the mountain and disappears into a more midground element and the "line" is then picked up by a building in the foreground. This kind of thing links pieces of a painting together in a wonderful way and makes things feel harmonious even in spite of a lack of harmony often.

If you haven't tried this kind of thing before just load up a picture of something and try tracing the lines that flow from one element to another along a figure or in a landscape.

Delofasht
10-05-2015, 09:12 PM
Today I posted about color mixing with colored pencils and because I found that thread so useful I thought I should share it here:

Using Primaries (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1389217)

Further more, I realized something while I was typing a rather long response there, color swatches are both an excellent way to test the paper and color mixes you can get through layering pencils. Even more than that though, was the fact that they are an incredible way to warm up the hand for drawing for the day in addition to all the gains of color knowledge one learns from doing them.

Instead of sitting down and doing swatches for endless hours, just pick a few colors that you haven't already done and start testing them in different layering and applications on a sheet of paper. Swatches can be rather dry and boring to do for a long time, but a few pencils and mixes a day can quickly make one become very familiar with the handling of their pencils and also their various color mixing potential. Also, trying to draw from a raw state first thing in the day can be rather challenging, as the hand doesn't seem to have very good pressure control or handling control right at the beginning of the day. I usually will do a few sketches in my sketchbook (which are pretty bad) before I start working on something important, but making swatches works for warming up as well. By the time I was done with my swatches and sketch, my hand felt under control and I could make very deliberate lines and smooth gradients without strain or stress.

I strongly suggest trying a few mixes a day, and would even say try keeping them on a sheet of paper you intend to keep for reference. It's very useful to know how to mix up some specific color you might normally need to go find an exact pencil or color for.

tiago.dagostini
08-03-2016, 10:56 AM
How is blending with brushes different in effect from blending with a colorless blender?

Colorless blender will PUSH pigment into the paper identations. Brushes move pigment OUT. The result is very different. Colorless blender tend to push towards a more burnished state while brushes go on the opposite direction.

TxAggieDarlin
01-23-2017, 12:27 PM
I just bought this paper and was not sure what to do with it :) Now, I know

Boafamily
06-29-2017, 09:30 AM
Walnut oil...probably smells better than the lighter fluid I grew up using...thanks for all the good tips.

JUDERM
12-29-2017, 12:50 AM
Amazing! I love to discover new tips and tricks. Something to try and learn from. Thanks!