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robinomalo
07-04-2015, 03:27 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/07-04-2015/1972933_11714526_1150427324972447_959967665_n.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/07-04-2015/1972933_11713556_1150427344972445_286630268_n.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/07-04-2015/1972933_11696756_1150427334972446_1579391606_n.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Honest Critics
Year Created:
Medium: Oil
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 10x10
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
Hi everybody, Here's 3 of my first painting with 3 different styles. I would like to have your honest opinion with maybe some tips and advices. Thank you very much

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
True opinion, no lying to be king please

La_
07-04-2015, 04:39 PM
critique #1: learn to crop

Welcome to WC!

la

La_
07-04-2015, 04:44 PM
...

harryfisherman
07-05-2015, 02:03 AM
The direct center of your canvas is a bad focal point. Start with this.....

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles/Johannes_Vloothuis/120/index.htm

Harry

harryfisherman
07-05-2015, 02:17 AM
Sorry that link didn't work. Try this......

http://willkempartschool.com/the-secret-of-good-composition/

Harry

La_
07-05-2015, 12:54 PM
rainbow colored piece:
nice that the city bit is off centered ... why the wall on the right? this totally blocks the viewer, makes their eyes work too hard climb around the wall to get into the actual scene, don't do that. color, where is all that rainbow coming from and why?

evening cabin piece:
i honestly think it's a winter scene, but the waterfall really confuses me. the composition is pretty good, moves me around to help me explore.

red piece: the 'perfect' composition to lead the viewer in with perspective lines and your trees shrink properly as they head to the distance ... tree trunk reflections are good (why the tree top reflections are not included i don't know).
i'm betting this is the only one you used a reference for, right?
i agree with harry that the direct centre is generally a bad focal point, this comp especially because it's centred vertically And horizontally and this is generally discouraged - the reason for that is that it gets boring really quickly, sucks you in very quickly, too quickly and tho many do challenge that and force it to work, most artists prefer to use a loose 'S' curve to add interest and help the viewer meander around longer.

a note on moons: it doesn't Have to be in the painting in order to use light/mood from it, but when it is there, it's best if it's good and round.

so yeah, do more, view more, see more and post more - one at a time will get you better critique, it's work to critique, make it easy for me.

la

robinomalo
07-05-2015, 09:01 PM
wow! Thank you very much for your advices and the time spent on this! Appreciate a lot! See you soon with other painting! Thank you again!

Bevahlee
07-06-2015, 10:52 AM
Here's an easy "fix" for your cabin. Make the cabin the focal point and get rid of the fence dead center and I would change the waterfall looking areas to some rocky shore on the lake, but only one side. And if you have a cloud covered moon, (which I really like) you might want some suggestions of clouds, because the moon will give light to them.

Bevahlee
07-06-2015, 11:03 AM
the one on the right could be done many ways. But right now it's abstract, some "realism" and some black, some blue, some round, some square.
Dominance of color and shape help hold a painting together. Here's one of a kajillion ways to pull it together. I just repeat elements you already have and change them up, so they're no longer "moon" or "ships"

Bevahlee
07-06-2015, 11:16 AM
on this one, you could move the moon over and up in the sky. Bringing the focal point to a more interesting location. And repeat the tops of the trees in the relfections. Nice color going on in this one.

robinomalo
07-06-2015, 02:21 PM
I don't know how you did that but wow that's amazing! Thanks a lot for your advice it means a lot to me!

Bevahlee
07-06-2015, 02:34 PM
Glad to hear it Robin. I did it with photoshop. Just picked up (cloned) some of your areas and put them in other places, for the most part. Glad to hear you like an honest critique. It's all about learning more, which I'm all about. Still learning after painting all my life, but I recently got chewed out big time for trying to help someone, and only by showing the darker areas from his photograph of a daylily. lol. woohoo, he did NOT like to be given any advice. The only way I learned was to ask someone who had been there and knew more than I did and I still do that. Good on you