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amature
06-10-2015, 04:46 PM
Have made from a clear plastic chocolate box a 'wet palette' for the acrylics.
Lined with kitchen roll tissue wetted, not too much, down and laid over the top of the tissue kitchen baking sheet cut from a roll followed by light even spray before setting out the colours but still seems to go off quite quickly. I know I can used an Acrylic retarder but our most local 'Range' art store tucked in the corner of the store doesn't have any which is strange seeing lots of acrylic colours.
Any other tips or substitutes would be welcome
thanks

Amature

cliff.kachinske
06-10-2015, 05:27 PM
Keeping the paint in piles helps. It takes experience to gage how often you can MIST the piles without turning them into puddles. Don't use a trigger sprayer; get a push-down-on-the-top spray bottle.

If you thinly spread the paint, as might happen if you mix with a brush, those thin films will dry almost as fast as the painting. Your kitchen tissue can't pass moisture fast enough to replace evaporative losses.

That's my experience anyway. Your mileage may vary.

Davkin
06-10-2015, 07:03 PM
I use a Sta Wet palette but just the box. I don't use palette paper, parchment paper, dampened paper towels or anything else. I've decided for me it's not worth the hassle. Instead I have a sheet of glass in the bottom of my box because I like a firm, smooth surface for mixing on. I place my paint in piles. Mixtures dry out fast but that's okay, I just plan on having to remix paint a lot, (makes me better at it :) ). Too keep my paint piles from skinning over I mist water over them every 10-15 minutes. I use an atomizer, not a spray bottle. Atomizers are basically small spray bottles but they put out a fine mist instead of droplets. If you use a spray bottle you'll eventually end up with acrylic soup.

Andre Yusin
06-10-2015, 07:28 PM
"tissue wetted, not too much"

That might be a problem. Make sure there's plenty of water.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-YC92y-vkM

Also, if you substitute the products some of those may not be quite to the task.

dawnra
06-11-2015, 07:49 AM
Hi all,

I use a W&N stay wet palette and I have to say its the business. It will keep the acrylic paint in good order for a week or more without having to re-moisten the tissue layer and I don't have to mist the paint too often while I am at the easel as it is kept nicely workable by the system. My only criticism is that the plastic used in manufacturing the palette and cover is a little flimsy.

Being a bit miserly,:D the palette is saving me loads of paint that used to dry on my old palette and then be chucked away.

Davkin
06-11-2015, 09:22 AM
I've kept my paints usable for up to a month, no wet tissue layer required. All you have to do is give them a good misting and then seal the paint from the air and it will stay good. I actually had more problems keeping paint usable when I used a damp paper layer because no matter what I did I'd have mold problems, without the damp paper I have zero mold issues.

dawnra
06-11-2015, 11:31 AM
David,

I haven't noticed a particular mould problem so far using the paper method. When I didn't use the papers and just misted the paints instead I tended to end up with a big pool of mud. I suppose the stay wet palette with paper layers suits me. I almost never spend more than a week or two working on an acrylic painting and tend to chuck the paper layers after each painting is finished. I must do a comparison between misting and papers and see how they both cope with a month left idle.

Regards

Charlie's Mum
06-11-2015, 03:53 PM
There's more information and ideas in this thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=278190) - I guess we all work with what's best for the individual!:)
I use the stay-wet palette - also a home made one ........ I put the paint into plastic milk bottle lids so it doesn't spread around when misted, use a sheet of baking parchment for mixing because I couldn't get away with using glass!
Paint stays workable a good length of time, as long as the lid is on and the kitchen-roll paper is kept quite damp.

ColinS
06-11-2015, 10:48 PM
After experimenting with various types of plastic containers, I now use a large Tupperware container bought at a thrift shop for $3, lined with parchment paper covered in wet paper towel. Paint lasts for well over a week easily as the seal on the Tupperware is far more airtight than in the stay wet palette I had.

Andrew
06-13-2015, 03:16 PM
I use a Sta Wet palette but just the box. I don't use palette paper, parchment paper, dampened paper towels or anything else. I've decided for me it's not worth the hassle. Instead I have a sheet of glass in the bottom of my box because I like a firm, smooth surface for mixing on. I place my paint in piles. Mixtures dry out fast but that's okay, I just plan on having to remix paint a lot, (makes me better at it :) ). Too keep my paint piles from skinning over I mist water over them every 10-15 minutes. I use an atomizer, not a spray bottle. Atomizers are basically small spray bottles but they put out a fine mist instead of droplets. If you use a spray bottle you'll eventually end up with acrylic soup.

I've kept my paints usable for up to a month, no wet tissue layer required. All you have to do is give them a good misting and then seal the paint from the air and it will stay good. I actually had more problems keeping paint usable when I used a damp paper layer because no matter what I did I'd have mold problems, without the damp paper I have zero mold issues.

Ditto (pretty much). I place my paint piles on fairly wet (not dripping) paper towels or strips of fabric (canvas leftovers or old t-shirt material) and mist when needed. Some mixtures get the same treatment as well. I have kept paint going for well over a month this way.

Andrew

Jon Bradley
06-13-2015, 06:58 PM
After using a tackle box, I have no interest in my sta-wet palette. It's just beyond convenient for acrylics.

When the moistened paper/chamois/whatever is still wet, even the left over mix piles are still wet!

Mike L
06-13-2015, 09:17 PM
After using a tackle box, I have no interest in my sta-wet palette. It's just beyond convenient for acrylics.

When the moistened paper/chamois/whatever is still wet, even the left over mix piles are still wet!

Guys love tackle boxes for everything - tool boxes, small bits boxes, hobby boxes, darn, just about any kind of box your can think of, the good ol' fashioned tackle box has to be able to do it faster and better. :lol: :lol: Do you have any photos of the set up you'd share?

R/Mike

Valri Ary
06-14-2015, 11:50 PM
I have one of those stay wet palette things. Pain in the A$$
I just use up all my paint and call it a day. I don't think I've not finished a painting in one day tho.
Although I too would like pics of that tackle box!!

Andrew
06-15-2015, 01:17 PM
I have one of those stay wet palette things. Pain in the A$$



How so? I have used one for years. Got it as a gift and it was larger and more shallow than the tupperware-esque unit I was using.

Andrew

Davkin
06-16-2015, 05:43 PM
It just occurred to me why I have problems with mold in a sta-wet palette that uses a paper layer when so many others don't. I don't use tap water, I use distilled water which doesn't have the chloramine that tap water does which kills off bacteria and I assume mold as well.

airplanz
06-16-2015, 10:13 PM
It just occurred to me why I have problems with mold in a sta-wet palette that uses a paper layer when so many others don't. I don't use tap water, I use distilled water which doesn't have the chloramine that tap water does which kills off bacteria and I assume mold as well.

A few drops of household chlorine bleach added to distilled water in a homemade sta-wet palette works as well. Or a few pieces of copper - like pre-1982 US pennies - seem to accomplish the same thing, in my experience. If it turns bluish-greenish when wet for a while its good.


Jim (airplanz)

Jon Bradley
06-16-2015, 11:40 PM
Mike, I'll post pix soon of my "setup" :p

janinco
06-16-2015, 11:59 PM
I tried a couple of different palettes, and finally decided on a circular porcelain palette. I mist it every 10 minutes or so while painting, then put the plastic lid on it (does not fit tightly) and put that in a Ziploc bag. I've kept paints workable for 4 weeks with no paper towels or sponges. If it does skim over, it's so easy to wipe off the paint.

Jan

thevaliantx
06-17-2015, 12:21 AM
Well, the instructions for the Sta-Wet Palette specifically state that mold is a result of leaving an overly wet --- appropriate for the painting session, not so for airtight storage --- underneath the paper the paints sit on. The instructions say to wring out the sponge and then put it back and seal up the container.

Also, having a very wet sponge sealed will lead to very runny paint blobs. What. A. Mess. :(

Davkin
06-17-2015, 01:22 AM
Exactly why I decided the sta-wet system was not worth the hassle.

Jon Bradley
06-17-2015, 01:33 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2015/1966978-box2.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jun-2015/1966978-box1.jpg

My sophisticated setup. ;) It's simply a tackle box that can clasp itself shut. It has some very wet paper towel at the bottom, which humidifies the paint without breaking it down. It stays that way as long as there's moisture in there.

The 2nd is what I like to use as my "dry" mix palette, as it absorbs excess moisture well (piece of cardboard) and if I want it a wet mix, I'll use a section of the tackle box.

If you go plein air, be sure to close the box after big mixes.

It's quite convenient.

tomtex
06-21-2015, 06:06 PM
ColinS has a setup similar to mine with a large Tupperware cupcake holder. A pane of glass serves as my mixing surface. Folded strips of kitchen paper towels along the edges of the glass keep paints perfectly for several weeks, although I have experience mold sometimes developing on umber paints after two weeks.

paynej49
06-23-2015, 01:05 PM
This may be somewhat off topic but I was wondering how and if a tube of dried acrylic paint could be revived for use. Is it impossible?
I have a large tube of Aquatech burnt sienna which might have come from the fifties! It's about as hard as a piece of dry taffee.
It just seems to me to be such a shame to waste such a piece of acrylic history.
Am I asking too much to do this?

cliff.kachinske
06-23-2015, 04:48 PM
Cut away the tube, slice up the paint slug and glue it to a support. :lol:

Andrew
06-23-2015, 11:54 PM
This may be somewhat off topic but I was wondering how and if a tube of dried acrylic paint could be revived for use. Is it impossible?
I have a large tube of Aquatech burnt sienna which might have come from the fifties! It's about as hard as a piece of dry taffee.
It just seems to me to be such a shame to waste such a piece of acrylic history.
Am I asking too much to do this?

Aquatec was the first foray into water dispersed acrylic colours (~1958 to the early 1960s) and were derived from the solvent based Magna line by Leonard Bocour. They had issues, from what I have read, but a big step forward in acrylic media.

Nevertheless, once dry, acrylics are done. The polymerization process is complete and they cannot be resurrected.

Andrew

paynej49
06-24-2015, 11:17 AM
Ah, a sad fate but an expected one.
It just seems such a shame to have this part of acrylic history and not being able to do anything with it.
All the same I'll hold on to it. Maybe take it to a chemical lab sometime and see if it can be revived chemically. There's always a first for anything!
I also do have some watercolor tubes from Bocour. And a tube of green earth from the Bellini line.
All of which are pliable and useable.
Thankyou for the replies!