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View Full Version : Jeremiah Lamenting the Destruction of Jerusalem by Rembrandt - reproduction


IronPawn
05-03-2015, 08:00 AM
Have so many threads open... sorry :) ! Ratio to original is close to 1:1 and after only couple of layers few things can be noticed: play between cold-warm (and in-between) with optical mixing and impasto with directional stroke or "pulling paint" stroke will be this exercise. Still at early stages. First photo is quite dark (sorry) but it's ok, it was beginning of the process anyhow. Second has some glare on it, but the idea is there. Trying not to cover, as much as I can, previous layer. Great challenge on control of paint, underlayer(s), brushstroke, color, light... Will continue sometime soon. Until next time, have a good one!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-May-2015/1893483-Jeremiah_1.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-May-2015/1893483-Jeremiah_2.jpg

Dana Design
05-04-2015, 12:12 PM
You DO challenge yourself with a great deal of skill at hand. Love watching these develop.

IronPawn
05-05-2015, 09:01 AM
You DO challenge yourself with a great deal of skill at hand. Love watching these develop.

Thank you Dana, I work very slowly as you can see :) Sometimes it's due to a time constraint, sometimes it's because of my (un)developed skill but that's why these type of challenges are good. I guess, to raise a bar at least for a bit... Thanks again and will keep posting as I go.

Dana Design
05-05-2015, 01:17 PM
IronPawn, I work slowly as well and have never understood why some feel it's a race to the finish. For me, it's in the doing that is the most enjoyable part of painting...even more so than in looking at the finished piece.

IronPawn
05-06-2015, 07:19 PM
IronPawn, I work slowly as well and have never understood why some feel it's a race to the finish. For me, it's in the doing that is the most enjoyable part of painting...even more so than in looking at the finished piece.

Totally agree Dana... process is where we learn the most and it is also the most creative part at the same time that shouldn't be rushed at all. When to hold or stop, when to continue, how to get there - choosing a path etc. What I noticed also with Rembrandt (well, it's nothing new) that he had perfect timing as well when it comes to brushstokes (either by using very sticky medium or by waiting for paint to partially dry, or both). In this painting it can be seen on Jeremiah's robe, for example, but also in other ones that I'm still working on (such as Johannes's nose and wrinkles) in order to create realistic illusion of texture either fabric or human skin... and this is just to name a few out of dozens and dozens in a single painting. Then the question is - did he applied it several times or just glazed first application. In which order were colors applied. Shadows, light, color, mood? This was clearly decided before painting was finished and you are right, how can someone race just to finish it? Funny staff. Small things like this can be easily overlooked... To make it clear, I have no illusions of understanding master's technique and genius or claim that this is even a correct path but rather get some help for my own work since I'm not academically trained. Naturally, this can only help us get better in this craft, hopefully :)

IronPawn
06-06-2015, 11:36 AM
I was working on this one in bits and pieces, almost in a mosaic style, picking a color or an area - because of time constraint, have to also do some actual work to pay bills :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2015/1893483-Jeremiah_3.jpg

OldNoob
07-05-2015, 11:23 PM
beautiful

IronPawn
07-06-2015, 05:34 AM
beautiful

Thank you OldNoob, so kind of you! Actually, still working on this one... Now I need to go back to it :)

IronPawn
08-30-2015, 12:58 PM
It was a while since last time I worked on this... hmmmm. Short session of about 45-60 minutes. Hopefully it will be done by the end of this year :) Probably somewhere at middle point by now.

Have a good one!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2015/1893483-Jeremiah_4.jpg