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View Full Version : Crucifixion of St. Peter - after Caravaggio


Joe'sHottie
05-01-2015, 10:26 AM
Just finished this after many months of perseverance - 30"x40" oil on canvas - and BOY, did I LEARN ALOT! I know St. Peter's face could still use some work, but I ran of out of energy and decided to call it done. Comments & Critiques always welcome.

Dana Design
05-04-2015, 12:26 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-May-2015/1800850-crucifixion-of-saint-peter-1601.jpg

Above is the original. Your copy is so very good! Don't give up on it!

Joe'sHottie
05-04-2015, 12:33 PM
Thank you, Dana - there were so many variations of this painting online, I took my reference from a book of his paintings (I actually ripped it out) - it showed much more detail than the reference you posted, but I actually like yours better! I'll keep at it - thank you so much for the encouragement.

IronPawn
05-05-2015, 08:57 AM
Just finished this after many months of perseverance - 30"x40" oil on canvas - and BOY, did I LEARN ALOT! I know St. Peter's face could still use some work, but I ran of out of energy and decided to call it done. Comments & Critiques always welcome.

Looks great... sometimes I feel the same way but after few days (or weeks) it comes back :-) Have a good one!

JCannon
11-28-2015, 10:11 PM
A superb reproduction. Did you attempt to emulate Caravaggio's technique? One quibble I would have with your version is that the blacks are not very deep or lustrous.

Joe'sHottie
11-30-2015, 02:46 PM
A superb reproduction. Did you attempt to emulate Caravaggio's technique? One quibble I would have with your version is that the blacks are not very deep or lustrous.

Thank you - this was my second attempt at Caravaggio's technique . . . and I agree, I'm still not sure how to get that deep, deep darkness behind the subjects - I used Ivory Black mixed with Alizarin Crimson for the blackest parts, but for some reason it's still not that beautiful deep black. Among many other things, I know I also need to work on how the subjects seem to emerge from the blackness into the light - not sure if the there's not enough 'darkness' or 'shadow' on the figures, or if the background isn't dark enough. Here's a better pic of the finished piece. Thank you for your comments and critiques - and I am open to any suggestions you may have. God bless.

sidbledsoe
12-01-2015, 07:50 AM
very good painting Angie!

Bloodfather
01-13-2016, 03:44 PM
For a deep deep black I mix black and UM blue.

Joe'sHottie
01-13-2016, 03:54 PM
For a deep deep black I mix black and UM blue.
Thanks for the advice - does the black and UM then give the black a blue cast? What would you use to get a red cast to the black?

Paul88
01-14-2016, 09:51 AM
For carravagio technique work on black background, blocking in white (he used lead white) an then building up with glazes.

Bloodfather
01-14-2016, 02:00 PM
Thanks for the advice - does the black and UM then give the black a blue cast? What would you use to get a red cast to the black?

First, let me say that I am not as experienced or gifted an oil painter as you, so please keep this in mind. But to get the desired effect, I would first paint the background in alizarin with a touch of black. I would let this dry, then go over all of this background with the umber ultramarine mix. To me, the brown neutralizes the blue completely. I think this is because blue's complement is orange, which is close to brown. Anyway, after you completely cover the Alazarin background with this deeper black, take a rag and lightly pick up the black in places where you see the deep red bleeding through on the original. Such as by St Peter's left arm.

To make the figures emerge from the shadows more, just make sure that you let the background bleed into the figures, and the figures bleed into the background. Or if this does not work-or you aren't getting the desired effect-make a glaze of the background color and run it along the contours of where back and foreground meet. I hope all this helps...

Glean
01-14-2016, 02:26 PM
I watched a lecture on Caravaggio where the expert mentioned in passing that in many of his paintings the shadowy background was a red or redish brown under layer that was glazed with a transperent black on top giving the warm almost black browns they have. He didn't go into any detail about it, as it was just a passing remark tho.

The vid was a full length (1hr, 2hr?) one on youtube from either a museum or university if I remember right and about caravaggio. I don't have the link anymore tho as my hard drive died not long ago. : /

Lorenz
01-19-2016, 10:06 AM
For a nice pseudo-black you may want to try a mixture of Terra Rossa (red earth brown e.g. by Schmincke) and Phthalo Blue (I used the one by Bob Ross). What you get is a very nontransparent deep dark that can easily be flexed to the bluish or the redish side.

AllisonR
01-19-2016, 04:37 PM
A lovely master copy. I would like to see it larger; it is hard to see how you have painted with such a small image.

A layer of any black (black, or black plus aliz crimson or anything else) is not going to give you the Caravaggio look. A layer of that, plus another layer of more black, or a deep blue, red, or violet.. will be better. Perhaps a third layer as well.

You made the yellow quite saturated in your version, but not the red shirt or the blue-green pants on the other figures. This puts too much emphasis on the one figure. In the original your eyes move around from figure to figure more. Fixable by adding a glaze to the red and blue-gren areas to increase the saturation.

Joe'sHottie
01-20-2016, 01:53 PM
First, let me say that I am not as experienced or gifted an oil painter as you, so please keep this in mind. But to get the desired effect, I would first paint the background in alizarin with a touch of black. I would let this dry, then go over all of this background with the umber ultramarine mix. To me, the brown neutralizes the blue completely. I think this is because blue's complement is orange, which is close to brown. Anyway, after you completely cover the Alazarin background with this deeper black, take a rag and lightly pick up the black in places where you see the deep red bleeding through on the original. Such as by St Peter's left arm.

Bloodfather, thank you for the advice - i'll certainly try that on my next attempt. For this one I did paint the background with alizarin and ivory black, but then worked in Venetian red with a touch of white, so it came very red and i lost alot of the deep darks. I like the process you mentioned above and will do that next time.

Joe'sHottie
01-20-2016, 02:02 PM
A lovely master copy. I would like to see it larger; it is hard to see how you have painted with such a small image.

A layer of any black (black, or black plus aliz crimson or anything else) is not going to give you the Caravaggio look. A layer of that, plus another layer of more black, or a deep blue, red, or violet.. will be better. Perhaps a third layer as well.

You made the yellow quite saturated in your version, but not the red shirt or the blue-green pants on the other figures. This puts too much emphasis on the one figure. In the original your eyes move around from figure to figure more. Fixable by adding a glaze to the red and blue-gren areas to increase the saturation.

Allison, Thank you for the suggestions. I am quite new to glazing and didn't glaze much on this one except the background, but I agree with you. I used Cad Red Light and Alizarin on the red shirt (both Grumbacher) but have since found a brighter Cad Red from another company that I will use in the future - maybe that was my issue with the red and green shirts, or maybe my lack of confidence in mixing color, which I am still working on. Attached is a larger version of the painting. Thank you so much for your comments.

AllisonR
01-21-2016, 02:09 PM
Much more to see now with the larger picture. The gold doesn't look so overpowering now.

I see you put white in your shadows - no! White makes solid, mass. Shadows are soft, air, no mass. I think you could soften some of the shadows to mid tones in the flesh areas. Like the knees - it is not so contrasty, see the original.

Bloodfather
02-23-2016, 10:03 AM
I do love your painting, though. I've gone back to it several times to look it over, just because I find it enjoyable. Definitely hang this up somewhere that you can proudly glance at it from time to time, an affirmation of your skill and artful character...

BTW: AllisonR always gives the most thoughtful, precise advice. I always hope that she will come across my paintings and remark, simply because she is such a wellspring of information...

Joe'sHottie
02-26-2016, 02:03 PM
I do love your painting, though. I've gone back to it several times to look it over, just because I find it enjoyable. Definitely hang this up somewhere that you can proudly glance at it from time to time, an affirmation of your skill and artful character...

BTW: AllisonR always gives the most thoughtful, precise advice. I always hope that she will come across my paintings and remark, simply because she is such a wellspring of information...

Bloodfather, I agree - valuable advice on this forum. I always find it so encouraging when artists are willing to help each other . . . it reminds me that people ARE generally good. :) Your work is amazing, and testimony to your willingness to persevere, and your openness to suggestions and comments.

At the moment, I have this in my family room. I've offered it to a few catholic churches, but it wasn't their 'style' . . . if you know someone who would enjoy and honor the efforts to create this, please send them my info. Not sure where God wants it or what he has planned for it, I was just honored he allowed me to paint it. (And thank God for Caravaggio - he did it first! :wink2: )

Bloodfather
03-04-2016, 08:49 AM
Aw shucks, I am really just an amatuer who hasn't found his way yet.

Your painting is very powerful and emotional. Please don't be discouraged that a couple of churches did not have a need for it; it probably had everything to do with subject matter and nothing to do with the artful skill that was applied.

Some how, my artistic abilities are directly tied to my ego; if I am painting something that I am happy with, I feel very happy and content. Conversely, if the last thing I painted was a disaster, I am saddened and lack confidence in general. If I had painted this I would be very, very happy with myself and would probably attempt to walk on water...just in case there were other miracles I was capable of working :)

sabana
04-21-2016, 10:32 AM
You know yourself what you arent happy with. I too would say the same thing. You said in earlier post the focal point(st Peters head). And youve hit the nail on the head(excuse the bad pun). Reproducing these masters means any difference and people will say somethings not quite right. But you know this as you said.
Time to be honest. How are you going to get his head right like the original. Well its not that hard but you will have to build up the layers more gradually than the rest of the painting. Letting each layer dry before applying another. Caravaggio took 7 layers or more for his faces. With the likeness you going to have to blow up the image to see the real detail in minutae. Then you will see a big difference between yours and the original.

Your painting looks fresh and has your own personal mark on it. But to get to the next level requires a bit more effort.

Good luck and happy painting!