PDA

View Full Version : First time using Golden Acrylic ground for pastels....


Jay-bird77
04-30-2015, 07:52 PM
This is where I'm at in this new project of mine.
I laid in a loose watercolor wash let dry then started setting up color relationships and then blocking in.
Now for some stumbling.
I'm trying not to finger blend and blur too much so I'm scumbling then instead of blowing off the dust I tap it lightly with my fingers(not enough to dull or flatten the colors.
I love how it's going so far......BUT I'm stuck!!
PLEASE help any suggestions would be greatly appreciated...
Sincerely jay-bird77.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Apr-2015/1190917-IMG_20150430_193652.jpg

Jay-bird77
04-30-2015, 09:39 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Apr-2015/1190917-IMG_20150430_213022.jpg Here is the next progression.
Started to detail my focal point(where the pathway ends).
I put in a reddish violet in the shadow area and a dull gray green in the background.
And some Prussian blue in areas.

Jay-bird77
05-01-2015, 08:47 AM
At this point in the painting I'm starting to add some bright saturated colors!
Also started adding the fallen leaves on the pathway(so far in the foreground).
I'm thinking about lessening the dark spots in the shadow area's or at least dulling them down a bit?
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-May-2015/1190917-IMG_20150501_083856.jpg
Also I noticed that in the transition areas of the shadow are a bit too red. I'm going to tone it down with some mid-value gray-violet?
C&C welcome....

water girl
05-01-2015, 08:59 PM
You are on the right track with this painting. :thumbsup: Every step leads to adjustments elsewhere. Let's see how you handle the next step.

Jay-bird77
05-02-2015, 03:22 PM
There's something about the shadows that I can't seem to capture!
Is it my color relationships or my mass relationships if either? PLEASE HELP....
I'm starting to think that I may have bit off more than I can chew with this gorgeous and realistic pastel demo by Phil Bates from the late Maggie Price one of my idols for sure!
I wish I had a way to post the finished demo it's stunning and dramatic! And colorful as well so many different colors it's scary for me!
Another shift in values....almost there I can almost feel it!? Tell me what you think?
The other thing is I haven't really started on the fallen leaves scattered throughout the pathway both in and out of shadow and light. That's the name of The book the demo is from. Painting Light and Shadow with Maggie Price.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-May-2015/1190917-1430594564061-328024540.jpg

Jay-bird77
05-03-2015, 01:52 AM
There's something about the shadows that I can't seem to capture!
Is it my color relationships or my mass relationships if either? PLEASE HELP....
I'm starting to think that I may have bit off more than I can chew with this gorgeous and realistic pastel demo by Phil Bates from the late Maggie Price one of my idols for sure!
I wish I had a way to post the finished demo it's stunning and dramatic! And colorful as well so many different colors it's scary for me!
Another shift in values....almost there I can almost feel it!? Tell me what you think?
The other thing is I haven't really started on the fallen leaves scattered throughout the pathway both in and out of shadow and light. That's the name of The book the demo is from. Painting Light and Shadow with Maggie Price.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-May-2015/1190917-14306322995421474319847.jpg

jackiesimmonds
05-03-2015, 03:44 AM
This is not a finish...nowhere near. This is a "start".

I see two problems. Shape, and temperature.

The original finished image is a totally different shape, which is part of the problem here, you have made it portrait shape so have changed the shape of the shadow mass as a result, and it does not read well as a shadow shape running horizontally across the road.
Then, shadow generally has an overall cool effect, despite the warm colours used in the earlier stages. This has to be the case.....warm light = cool shadow. Sometimes artists put warm colours into shadows, but usually at the "edge" of the shadow where it transitions into sunlight. In general, the shadow has to be cooler than anything which is sunlit.

The finished image has many, many more touches of dappled light breaking up the shadow. The warm colours are reserved for the orange leaves on the path, but the shadow itself is cool.

this is the image you have been transcribing:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-May-2015/1805-phil_bates_earlier_stages2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-May-2015/1805-phil_bates_in_MP_book.jpg

Here is the link. Yuo can scroll up and down to see the demo:

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=RWltmswIZhUC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=pastel+demo+from+phil+bates/maggie+price&source=bl&ots=XbmvXJ8Zco&sig=UN2cTkohbIqr9c0KskuQ-iX5a4w&hl=en&sa=X&ei=IMlFVZLBIIrkaoCXgYgJ&ved=0CCsQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=pastel%20demo%20from%20phil%20bates%2Fmaggie%20price&f=false


See how the shadow falls across the road, rather than "down" onto it; the shapes are far more horizontal and wide than you have them. Your shadow shapes look kinda blobby, and have defined curved, specific edges in places, which I do not see at all in the original.
The demo examples show the use of the brilliant colour early on.....but these brilliant colours become dramatically modified as the painting progresses.

Slow down now....look really hard to match colours and tones..please read the text, it will be helpful to you. I emphasise this because I believe that usually, people just try to copy the pic and don't read the text, this is quite usual, I was warned about this by the publishers when I was writing my books!

I recommend you tackle a small area and get it as right as you can, instead of generalising as you have done. Don't touch the leaves on the ground until the shadow tone and colour is right, they go on absolutely last.

Next time you decide to copy a demo, which is a good way to learn, always to make your canvas the same shape as the original, because otherwise the changes to the shapes within the image can be quite disturbing.

Jay-bird77
05-03-2015, 07:42 AM
Thank you so JackieSimmons!
You are exactly right! Now that I think back when I was painting I peeked a few steps ahead and got caught up in trying to get all of the many different colors I was seeing then I must have totally forgot to go back and slow down. I'm gonna study the image a bit more and reread possibly a few more times!

jackiesimmonds
05-04-2015, 03:49 AM
I found it fascinating when the publishers told me to keep the text very short and to the point, because in their experience, very few people read the words, they just look at the pictures in an art instruction book! I found this quite difficult to stomach, given the time I spent being very careful about how I explained everything! I do understand the desire to crack on, and therefore to jump steps, but you have to remember that when you see a "step by step", even then you are not really seeing every step. No artist completes a picture in 6 or so steps, that is laughable. Every stroke is a new "step" along the way, and if you see a breakdown in 6 or so steps, you are seeing just a tiny fraction of the work involved.

It is really useful to see the early stages of any artist's work. It is those early stages which are the foundations for the later, detailed work that is placed "over the top". Without a strong foundation, the painting is likely to fail, or certainly has more chance of failing. So, when trying to copy and learn from another artist, it is the early steps which are the most critical to study. Get those almost right, and the details will sit nicely over those early steps.

Jay-bird77
05-04-2015, 02:35 PM
I really enjoy reading your response's and suggestions because I always seem to come away with a jewel or two! You explain things in just the right way for me anyway and for that I'm so very grateful and appreciative so keep them comments,questions and critiques especially when I'm doing something wrong because I need to know what and how to do it right next time! So thank you!

Blayne
05-04-2015, 09:53 PM
Excellent help from Jackie! I didn't comment on your painting earlier because I could not figure out, due to its exaggerated height, exactly what you were painting. I could see the sky, trees and road at the top but didn't know what was going on in the bottom two-thirds of the painting. I agree with Jackie that cropping your painting to the proportionate size of the demo will help.