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Grumpy Old Man
04-23-2015, 11:41 AM
Is the best practice to mix acrylic paint on the canvas or on the palette? Or are there other considerations such as genre or even a particular subject? Or something else altogether?

This inquiring mind wants to know. :wave:

cliff.kachinske
04-23-2015, 12:13 PM
The answer is yes. :wink2:

By which I mean the best practice is whatever works for you on any given painting. So there's no "best practice" and no standard answer.

The Information Kiosk on this page contains a wealth of information. Also, for a beginner, Will Kemp has a number of free videos that will get you started. At least you will be able to get paint on a surface without having a complete disaster.

Also, be aware there are whole worlds of technique that Mr. Kemp does not cover. But you can explore those once you get some basic skills in applying paint.

idylbrush
04-23-2015, 12:14 PM
Either technique will work, as long as you accomplished the intended result. You may switch techniques depending on the subject, brushes or knives used. It really is a personal preference.

cinderblockstudios
04-23-2015, 12:33 PM
Yeah I really agree with the others here, if it works for you then that's what you should use. For my work I'll mix 95% of everything on the palette, but leave a little room for wet into wet mixing techniques if that's what the project calls for.

Grumpy Old Man
04-23-2015, 01:24 PM
I apologize. I'll go ahead and cancel my membership to this forum. Apparently it is not, as I was informed, amateur friendly.

If you don't like a question or can't answer it, you might consider not posting at all.

Again, I apologize for stealing your valuable time.

Fox_eNova
04-23-2015, 02:24 PM
Grumpy, I don't believe we have any unfriendly folks here. Help, directions & suggestions are always abound.
I'm a rookie. I don't use a palette at all. I find mixing paint in a 2oz. plastic cup best to get the color and consistency I am after. This may not be the most expeditious method, but works for me. With a lid on the cup I can save the paint/color mix for later to do touch-ups. I paint very thin, an "on canvas" mix usually gives me a muddled mess to be scraped off.

cinderblockstudios
04-23-2015, 03:49 PM
I apologize. I'll go ahead and cancel my membership to this forum. Apparently it is not, as I was informed, amateur friendly.

If you don't like a question or can't answer it, you might consider not posting at all.

Again, I apologize for stealing your valuable time.

Wait, what? This forum is VERY amateur friendly. I don't believe anyone who has posted to this thread has disregarded your initial question (unless of course you are referring to another thread that you started).

Dcam
04-23-2015, 04:53 PM
Hey Grumpy.
I like a combination of both. If you make a lot of mixes on the palette, you need to worry about them drying while you work and that is why I like a wet into wet technique. I usually though, have about two or three values of a color ready to go on the palette.
Have fun.
Derek

hope you are still there.

Bob in Florida
04-23-2015, 09:35 PM
Well I guess you live up to your name.

I read nothing impertinent in any of the replies.

For my self, I do most mixing on a palette, but recently have been experimenting with wet on wet canvas mixing.

Hope this helps.

TamiP
04-23-2015, 11:48 PM
I think it would limit yourself needlessly to only use one technique. Both have their places. I would say that I apply both about 50/50 on any painting, with some exceptions where a certain attempted style lends itself more to one than the other.

Morton
04-24-2015, 03:29 AM
Hi Grumpy, yeah there are one or two pains in the neck on these boards but most people are friendly and try to help.

I concur with everyone above that there is no "best practice" just different ways of doing things, some of which may suit you better than others and at different times and for different applications.

If I will only need a small one off amount of mix and the colours are on my palette I'll mix it there.

Sometimes I mix a background, usually a sky, "on the canvas" (the "..." is because I paint on a paper or cardboard support mostly not on actual canvas). That way I can blend a sky from the paler horizon line deepening the colour as I go upwards and can add texture gel where I want it if I want impasto to one area only. Or I'll mix wet in wet to get soft edges.

Like Fox I also mix colours in small plastic tubs with lids so that I can save a mix for touching up later. I'll also mix in a yoghurt pot, on a takeaway carton lid or on a white ceramic plate if I can use it within ten or fifteen minutes. Acrylic dries quickly so it depends partly on how hot your room is as to how fast it will stay useable.

I use a homemade stay-wet palette which is a lidded sandwich box with a layer of plain white damp paper towel on the bottom and a layer of greaseproof paper on top of it (I think greaseproof paper might be called 'baking parchment' in some countries?). My palette is not very large so I don't tend to mix in there but there is nothing stopping me from having two palettes and mixing in one of them. I do use the lid like that.

I can't think of anything else right now, hope that helps.

Wassie
04-24-2015, 03:13 PM
I do both.

Charlie's Mum
04-25-2015, 07:56 AM
I apologize. I'll go ahead and cancel my membership to this forum. Apparently it is not, as I was informed, amateur friendly.

If you don't like a question or can't answer it, you might consider not posting at all.

Again, I apologize for stealing your valuable time.

I am one of the Moderators of this Acrylics forum and cannot see any reason for your post. No member has given you any kind of answer with which you could take issue - they have all been helpful in their replies.
If you have a problem in another thread in this forum please contact me by Private Message and I will look into it.

Wassie
04-26-2015, 12:42 AM
I apologize. I'll go ahead and cancel my membership to this forum. Apparently it is not, as I was informed, amateur friendly.

If you don't like a question or can't answer it, you might consider not posting at all.

Again, I apologize for stealing your valuable time.

I don't understand your saying this forum isn't amateur friendly. I thought you got helpful answers. My answer was that I do both. I sure hope that didn't offend you.