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glass22
03-30-2015, 06:22 PM
Hi everyone.

I'm new to painting.

1. My white really doesn't cover colors very well when I paint it over it's titanium but really cheap is it badly covering because it's cheap or is it normal?

2. On youtube people seem to have paint on their brush it flows great and seems to continue producing paint for a long time, where as mine seems to constantly need more paint? is this due to cheap paint?

3. When I glaze white over an area it seems to produce fog, where as I want it to look like light? I'm using cheap titanium white is this the problem, or do I need a different approach?

4. How thick should acrylic paint be when I want to blend wet onto wet? unless it put a huge amount it seems to just instantly dry?

idylbrush
03-30-2015, 09:12 PM
Hi everyone.

I'm new to painting.

1. My white really doesn't cover colors very well when I paint it over it's titanium but really cheap is it badly covering because it's cheap or is it normal?


It may take several layers to cover, more if it is student grade. Professional grade may cover better but that is no guarantee.

2. On youtube people seem to have paint on their brush it flows great and seems to continue producing paint for a long time, where as mine seems to constantly need more paint? is this due to cheap paint?

They my be mixing it with an extender, or thinning it a bit. Some of these techniques just take time to learn Many keep a spritz bottle near by for mostening the surface as yoou paint. Not wet, just moisten.

3. When I glaze white over an area it seems to produce fog, where as I want it to look like light? I'm using cheap titanium white is this the problem, or do I need a different approach?

You may need to experiment with a different technique. White is gnerally not the bst color for "light". A light yellow might be a better option and used in a more opaque form.

4. How thick should acrylic paint be when I want to blend wet onto wet? unless it put a huge amount it seems to just instantly dry?

blending has more to do with how the paint is applied. Try using a glazing medium, or a spritz bottle, move quickly and use a blending technique. Figure 8s or criss cross may be a viable option. Check YouTube and watch how some of these folks blend. Dry brush might be another option with scumbling.

oramasha
03-30-2015, 10:26 PM
I suspect that you might be watching oil painting videos.

I screwed up an ear recently and used gesso for a do-over. Luckily, it worked, but you do have to be careful if you don't want to build up texture.

I can't really add anything to Idylbrush's suggestions; I use the same techniques more or less. Mainly, dry brush and glazing and working quickly to blend for soft edges.

Fox_eNova
03-30-2015, 11:29 PM
If you thin it too much, it will take multiple coats to cover anything. If I want to cover a darker color with white, sometimes I mix a thin solution of gesso and put it over 1st or just use it for the white. Also make sure you have a damp brush before you dip for paint.

Charlie's Mum
03-31-2015, 08:06 AM
Yes, cheap paint is to blame for the most part - but acrylics normally take more than one coat anyway.

It's often false economy to buy really cheap paint - some student grades are reasonable - and DalerRowney System 3 is excellent for the price.

For blending - as Idylbrush suggests!Moisten canvas or paper, apply a reasonable amount of paint - too thin will dry faster - colours quickly side be side and then use strokes across the 'join' - with practise, going along the length also works well, back and forth into each colour.
Practise-Practise-Practise.:)

glass22
03-31-2015, 08:07 AM
problem is, when i pull colour across then go to do it again it puts a puddle of the 2nd colour into the first before i pull?

glass22
03-31-2015, 08:10 AM
Another issue I'm having is, I lay down paint, then do more and end up with like a hole in the middle? like I've pulled the paint off that part but for some reason can#t put i back?

cliff.kachinske
03-31-2015, 08:43 AM
Another issue I'm having is, I lay down paint, then do more and end up with like a hole in the middle? like I've pulled the paint off that part but for some reason can#t put i back?

Acrylics have three stages of drying. It just takes experience to know what's going on.

1. Still wet. Okay to brush into and blend.
2. Skinned over and pretty much locked in place. Okay to paint over.
3. In between. Not okay to paint over. Paint may have a skin or is just starting to skin over but the under layer is still wet and not stuck to the canvas.

problem is, when i pull colour across then go to do it again it puts a puddle of the 2nd colour into the first before i pull?

That's a practice issue. It has to do with how you load your brush and your touch as you drag across. You may have better luck allowing the first color to dry and then dry brush or scumble the second.

glass22
03-31-2015, 09:10 AM
Thanks!....back to more practice

LavenderFrost
03-31-2015, 11:38 AM
Adding my 2 cents:

When I used cheap paint I also noticed the paint didn't flow like it does when I watched Jerry Yarnell on tv. Better paint helped a bit, but it is also tricky to thin it just the right amount, enough to flow but not too transparent.

Zinc white is more transparent and might be better for glazing, if you need to.

Blending is hard! I can blend thicker paint in a very small area, but in large areas it's better to keep it wet. If you can find a video of Jerry Yarnell painting skies check that out. And watch for that tacky stage! Don't touch it then until it is very dry. If you do pull some paint off, let it dry and carefully paint over it and let it dry again completely before you do any more there.

Jonathan S
03-31-2015, 11:50 AM
I'm finding that the brushes have a lot to do with how the paint flows, particularly what they're made of. I watch Jerry Yarnell paint a whole tree with one loading of his script brush. He uses sable I think. I get one branch of paint with mine (not sable).

glass22
03-31-2015, 12:29 PM
What brushes should I have? I've been using super cheap ones but was looking to upgrade soon.

What's a liner brush? is this the same as round brush?

I want synthetic only for acrylics right?

glass22
03-31-2015, 12:29 PM
P.s I've been practicing blending and I think the issue was I was just being too heavy handed.

Fox_eNova
03-31-2015, 02:36 PM
A Liner brush is a long haired small brush with few hairs. Good for making thin lines :-) "Nail Art" brushes available at eBay/ Amazon (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71Mh6kDBK2L._SL1500_.jpg) I like the long ones on the right. I bought nail art brushes for fine lines and small details/fixes. They don't last long (for me) but are cheap and do the job.

~JMW~
03-31-2015, 02:58 PM
Jerry Yarnell uses both bristle brushes and chisel edge synthetic.
http://www.yarnellart.com/cart2/cartimages/product/AcrylicsetY.jpg
http://www.yarnellart.com/cart2/cartimages/product/WCsetY%20%282%29.jpg

I didn't buy his , but found similar to his and they work well for me..
I even use some cheap brushes from the hardware section for my bigger sizes.

EnPassant
03-31-2015, 03:25 PM
Another issue I'm having is, I lay down paint, then do more and end up with like a hole in the middle? like I've pulled the paint off that part but for some reason can#t put i back?

This can happen if the paint you are trying to put on is a different consistency (less medium or thicker) than the paint already on the canvas. Just leave it dry and do it again.

Charlie's Mum
03-31-2015, 03:26 PM
Cheap synthetics are OK as long as they have enough hairs!:lol: ........ sounds strange, but some really cheap ones won't hold the paint!
I find Royals are good - they won't last, but they're cheap enough to replace and Graduate by (I think) W&N and similar by DalerRowney will work.
Try to go to a shop so you can feel them - see if they have some spring in them!
I personally don't like bristles for Acrylics.

The hardware stores here have some good (relatively cheap) no-shed brushes - I have an 1" for gesso and broad coverage - larger if using bigger canvases.

Rounds are just that, 'bellied' brushes that come to a point.
Filberts are flatter and have rounded corners
Straights are flat with chisel edge - really good for braod brushstrokes and used edge-wise for lines.
Liners, or scripts, have along, tapered fine head - used, as Eric says, for fluid lines.
Specialist brushes like fans, swords, daggers, etc make lovely brush strokes or, as in fans, used for blending.
Look up brush shapes in online catalogues.

EnPassant
03-31-2015, 03:28 PM
P.s I've been practicing blending and I think the issue was I was just being too heavy handed.

When blending have the same consistency, the same amount of medium, in each side of the blend. Hard to blend thick with thin (see my last post). But it is far better to paint in layers, makes it much easier to get blends.

jocko500
03-31-2015, 10:34 PM
I add a drop or two of airbrush median so the paint can flow longer. just check it out . i like it
http://www.dickblick.com/products/liquitex-airbrush-medium/

oramasha
04-01-2015, 10:40 AM
It is easy to pull paint off your canvas/board if you brush over where you already placed a stroke. I find it easiest just to let it dry and then give it another pass if you need a color to go on more evenly or opaquely. And/or load up your brush with a lot of paint! You'll get more coverage with artist grade and less frustration...hopefully you're using artist grade.

Jonathan S
04-01-2015, 12:23 PM
All very confusing to me. I was under the impression that you did NOT want synthetic brushes with acrylics because they don't hold the paint as well as an animal haired brush. Am I way off base here?
I have a couple of small sable brushes and they do work really well for detail work, better than my small synthetics. the synthetics work fine for larger stuff.
Starting to not like my bristles as much, so I'm with you on that.

oramasha
04-01-2015, 03:48 PM
All very confusing to me. I was under the impression that you did NOT want synthetic brushes with acrylics because they don't hold the paint as well as an animal haired brush. Am I way off base here?
I have a couple of small sable brushes and they do work really well for detail work, better than my small synthetics. the synthetics work fine for larger stuff.
Starting to not like my bristles as much, so I'm with you on that.


You'll probably destroy your brushes with natural hair since acrylics dry so quickly on the brush and the hair will get all deformed. Once stuck (the paint has dried), it's really hard. . .even with a synthetic to get the bristles clean and workable. I use bigger brushes or medium when I need to paint a big area or use a medium if I want a long line. Or, go over the area more than once. You just learn to accept the medium and stop fighting against it and get creative with your work-arounds. It's taken me a while to figure that out, believe it or not.

For me, the bristles tend to hold water and then my paint is more watery than I want it to be. And it ruins the brush unless you just use it to scrub in a color or to scumble or something. But, I'm sure anyone could find a way to make anything "work". I just find synthetics work for me.

cinderblockstudios
04-06-2015, 01:50 AM
1 and 2: Cheap paint as well as cheap brushes will have problems with coverage. On the paint side if you're using anything less than artists grade paint you'll have to use multiple layers to cover other colors as the pigment load is much lower in cheap paints. Cheaper brushes also won't hold as much paint as ones with a denser pack of bristles, however reapplying paint to the brush happens more often than you may think, even in videos.

3: This is a common misconception about adding "light" to a piece. Yellow is more accurate color to use of lighting than white.

4: This can vary between the quality of paint you use, the quality/absorbancy of canvas you use, as well as how dry or humid your painting environment is. Higher quality products will likely last longer, in addition to working in a more humid environment. Things like cheap canvas, cheap craft or student grade paint, and/or painting outside or in a dry room will result in a faster drying paint film.

Hope this helps a bit.

Jon Bradley
04-06-2015, 03:28 AM
I have to agree completely with the synthetic brushes for acrylic. Naturals just get wrecked for some reason, so a mid-range brush usually does effect you can imagine if you're doing your part, and you can just grab some more if they die. :p

I'm going to expand on the add yellow instead of white comment cinder said, which is very accurate, for tinting things up. Aiming to "warm" a white with some yellow and touch of a red (to ultimately add to your intended color) tends to maintain the effect of lighting something up without flipping the color temperate to cool, which can easily happen when you simply add a white-"chalky."

Off-topic, I really enjoy your work, Cinderblock! :clap:

cinderblockstudios
04-07-2015, 12:26 AM
Off-topic, I really enjoy your work, Cinderblock! :clap:

Thank you!

kin3
04-07-2015, 08:24 AM
Jerry Yarnell uses both bristle brushes and chisel edge synthetic.
http://www.yarnellart.com/cart2/cartimages/product/AcrylicsetY.jpg
http://www.yarnellart.com/cart2/cartimages/product/WCsetY%20%282%29.jpg

I didn't buy his , but found similar to his and they work well for me..
I even use some cheap brushes from the hardware section for my bigger sizes.

I bought these brushes and love them.
Jerry Yarnell's videos will teach you a lot. Look them up on YouTube or go to his site.:wave:

jonc50
04-08-2015, 01:30 AM
I find that using a watercolour block with fairly heavy paper instead of a canvas board will solve a lot of blending problems with the lighter colours. You might like to try it on a small inexpensive block to see the difference.