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it'sALLart
10-05-2003, 08:26 PM
i am sitting in my gallery after a very slow weekend. we had an opening on friday nite and so did the gallery next door. i had 33 of my new works up, a new series of blockprints. Some of these are deeply layered and nearly pushed to abstraction, some are basic "one up's" and some are somewhere in-between. lots of great compliments, lots of positive feedback.

the gallery next door had an artist that takes cabinet doors, puts a little oval thingy over the handle holes and impresses a title into it. he paints the outer wood as a frame and takes the inner panel and puts a painting on it. the titles are cute and humorous, the work is sometimes good, sometimes odd, sometimes not worth mentioning. there were over 100 of these things. i saw three that i thought were just OK, and I like all kinds of art, realism, abstract, etc. our price range was about the same.

they sold 14, i sold 1. color me stumped and a tiny little bit bitter. I'm trying very hard to measure my success in terms of "the work is up and finished and I was very happy about each piece when finished" but some sales would be nice. and they also help pay the bills. :-)

my questions: was it most likely the gimmick of the cabinet doors that sold these things or the "name" of the artist? is using a gimmick what it gets down to these days in order to be heard above the din and sell work?

i'm having a hard time dealing with my lack of sales in terms of it being a lack of success, no matter how much talking to myself otherwise i do. arrggghh.

:mad:

lisilk
10-06-2003, 09:28 PM
Oh, I feel for you. Been there done that. I know it's very hard not to take it personally. I have often found that I get more sales after a show. People take cards and call me at home because they know commissions are high.

I also have done outdoor shows where I had a scrapbooking booth on one side and a booth that sold wood pens made from kits on the other. They couldn't wrap up their work fast enough while I sat there with my hand painted silks and sold almost none. I was so upset !!!!

I believe part of the problem is in educating the public. They don't understand the amount of effort that goes into our work. I have a framed series of progress shots that display with my work, that helps people to understand how unique they are.

Just wanted to tell you not to give up. The right venue is out there for you somewhere. :cat:

Cheers,

Li

lisilk
10-06-2003, 09:29 PM
P.S. Please don't go the gimmick route. Stick with your passion and it will happen for you !

Li

it'sALLart
10-07-2003, 08:39 AM
Thanks Lisilk, for your thoughts, I don't have much choice of venues at this point, my gallery is "brick and mortar" and i pretty much have continue with the lease for now.

After Sunday passed, I began to feel much better, especially since I received an email from a client, telling me they would be back to purchase later this week.

I also found out that the purchases made next door were mostly from the artist's friends and family, so I began to understand what was happening. It's a kind of "nepotism" that happens from time to time with a show. I have yet to see the reviews of the shows in the paper, and I wonder what they will say about it....

No, i'm not a gimmick kind of guy, just don't get where that falls into fine art. Cute titles and interesting formats are nice, but the art has to be quality too for me. And his simply was not, in my opinion.

Your pen and scrapbook story reminded me of a fair where I kept watching 2x4's painted to look like snowmen go by all day in the hands of buyers while I stood there and sold next to nothing. That is just so wrong.

One of the reasons I don't do fairs anymore at all: Craft has taken over the world of Art. At least now, I'm competing with art again.

Eugene Veszely
10-07-2003, 10:58 AM
Originally posted by lisilk
P.S. Please don't go the gimmick route. Stick with your passion and it will happen for you !

Li

I second that :)

Keith Russell
10-07-2003, 07:41 PM
The very first art show I ever did was a holiday show in Dallas. Fortunately I didn't pay much for the booth. It was the second annual show for this particular promoter, and they had run quite a few ads (even a couple billboards) to advertise the first annual show, but they apparently didn't run any ads the second year.

70 artists, three days, four customers.

Yes, four.

Right after I moved back to Kansas City in 1993, I was in an outdoor show, where six really good fine artists (and myself, the rest of the booths featured crafts or mass-produced goods) watched the food vendors rake in the dough.

The only non-food vendor who made any money was a guy selling styrofoam alligators on sticks. The brightly coloured gators would 'walk', as they were dragged on the ground.

That guy sold out!

The rest of us went home with all our work, and horrific sunburns.

It happens...

K

it'sALLart
10-08-2003, 08:05 AM
You 70 artists should have found the show organizer, got your money back and tarred and feathered him and ran him out of town. It would have been Texas Justice. :-)

Keith Russell
10-08-2003, 10:58 AM
True...

K

Smileawhyl
10-12-2003, 06:56 PM
I've done a fair amount of mass promoted shows with the same result. However, once I moved to the city and now that the neighborhood is undergoing gentrification, I've had success in promoting 'Fine Art Yard Sales', advertised in the newspaper under yard sales. I've done this twice and sold out every finished piece I had which was collecting dust, plus most of the jewelry I made during my "bead" period. Price-wise, there was very little haggling except about my nostalgic items (I was insulted that someone only wanted to pay $125 for my feet at the ocean's edge . . . until they pulled out the cash).

A few friends have been discussing the idea of an 'Art Cafe' (a good idea only if you have restaurant/liquor license experience on your side), but a very good avenue of promotion in the city is to let a nice restaurant hang your work (make sure it's insured). One of the upscale lounges in town actually has an artist on staff who keeps the place swimming in artwork and he splits the profits with the owner.

best regards,
Patty

Keith Russell
10-12-2003, 10:36 PM
Patty, that's excellent, congrats.

But, doesn't that sort of thing work better with some types of artwork, than others?

What types of works were you selling at these 'fine art yard sales'?

(Enquiring minds want to know...)

K

Smileawhyl
10-12-2003, 11:41 PM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
doesn't that sort of thing work better with some types of artwork, than others?

What types of works were you selling at these 'fine art yard sales'?

(Enquiring minds want to know...)

K

Types of artwork . . . here goes. It is a bredth of work.

I once owned a boutique, Coppercreek where I sold comfortable artsy clothing (not mine), punctuated with ceramic fixtures of cast hands which held shelves, two hand wall lamp sets, vases, letterholders etc. (mine), assorted jewelry (artisans and mine) and Kaminski hats (I think you'd need to be a girl to appreciate that one . . . also, not mine). I sold the enterprise and moved on but kept all my own work stock, consisting of the ceramic hand fixtures and fimo bead jewelry (which was pretty 'out there' and not your run-of-the-mill stuff).

The yardsale consisted of:

Ceramic hand sets (3 shelves, 5 lamps-- right and left hand shade models, 20 'thumb hooks' and unnumbered assorted vases and letterholders). One hair salon shop owner showed up and bought every piece I had.

Fimo bead jewelry (including 5 sets of a hinged black and white panel earrings depicting the rise and fall of man). Again, a clothing shop owner who wanted unusual chachkis for her shop bought most, individuals, the rest.

Oil paintings ('fast flowers a la Bob Ross' 6 at $20 apiece, fine photo quality flowers, 4 at $40 apiece, divorce transition abstracts, 3 at $60 to $150 depending upon the size--funny how it seems to be my best work . . . when I'm angry, and assorted body parts (mostly mine) in pseudo meaningful circumstances (5 or 6 between $50 and $125--I still should have got more for the feet))

Mixed Media (Tissue, plaster, like the one in my tissue & plaster thread) on stretched canvas--abstracts. I had 8 of these but kept the one in the thread. Sold to one buyer (I strongly suspect a restaurant owner), for $250.


I think any type of art will be viable as long as you advertise it as what it is. Everybody seems to scan the yardsale ads, especially in the city and everybody is looking for what they think is a bargain.

The second yardsale I had, I just didn't have time enough to produce much artwork, but needed to sell some furniture, so I billed that as a Fine Art and Furniture sale. I still sold all the artwork as opposed to about half the furniture.

I wasn't alarmed by lower prices because in the first yardsale I had work dating back 20 years, including student stuff, and just didn't have the room anymore to warehouse it.

Even if you had to travel and borrow the yard of a friend in a bigger metropolis, there is a lot of money out there, especially in the pockets of younger yet unmarried professionals, with many diverse interests, so I don't think subject matter is that important.

And don't discount restaurants and lounges. This too is viable in the right city.

regards, as always,

Patty

Shehaub
10-13-2003, 12:19 PM
it'sALLart :

I live north of Indianapolis about 35-40 minutes. Its about the same distance to Lafayette. Having been here for a year, I have decided that the people I live near are very "practical" people. There are some with and without a lot of disposable money, but the way they spend money is quite the same. I am not sure how it is in the actual city of Indy. There are people who buy art without a gimmick, but the crafty stuff is so common in the faces of these people, and so easily affordable, that it really is a challenge. There is a combo craft/antique/card/soda shop on every corner around here. The longevity of a gimmick is limited. Those who do have a "cute" idea are always in search of a new "cute" idea because the old ideas just get old fast. A real piece of art is not limited like that.

There are some really great art shows, so I am told by other people in the studio that I go to. Crawfordsville is one I can think of right off the top of my head. I am told that there are serious art buyers there. There are seasonal shows in Lafayette, I know for sure. That might be a bit more north than you want to go, but here is the link (http://dcwi.com/~taf/events.html) to TAF if you are interested. There are more, I just can't remember off the top of my head. I am not in touch with the Indy Art scene. I tend to go the opposite direction, for now. Personally, I don't have enough together to even make a show, but I am fortunate to have met artists who have done a lot of groundwork in this area and are always giving me pointers.

I wish you the best of success.

it'sALLart
10-13-2003, 01:59 PM
Thanks, shehaub, but no thanks! :)

Art fairs, art shows and art festivals are a thing of the past for me. I decided two years ago to stick with being in galleries only and even though it may not see as much traffic, the competition is more on an even keel with other galleries and the clientele that come in are looking for real for quality 2-d art, not crafts.

As you said, there's a crafty craft store on every corner, and the last three years the art fairs have grown even worse. Add to that how risky they are with no-sho traffic or bad weather. I've been to the worst of the worst in both regard and decided after 5 years of doing them "no more!". Like Keith Russell alluded to already, there's nothing worse than taking home every piece you've created only to see the guy with the "gimmick" sell out. It's the Walmartification of America. Some people have no problem with doing them all year long, some even travel in winnebagos all over the place to do them. I just can't handle that kind of life. Felt too much like a carny.

It feels easier on my psyche, sales or not, in my gallery for now.

JoyJoyJoy
10-17-2003, 02:07 PM
Unfortunately, our American society is used to cheap, mass-produced, gimmicky merchandise... and it is harder to sell original art that is hand-made and must be priced accordingly.

However, I do think there is a customer for every artwork... and alot of money to be spent out there. The problem is finding the form of marketing (gallery, craftshows, etc) that attracts the kind of customer you need to sell your particular kind of work. Or, you can create for the market... which will guarantee sales, but may not be comfortable for some artists.

Li... Concerning your comment that we must "educate the public" about our work. Please do not take this personally, just a quick personal story. During a short time in my youth, I was a women's wear buyer for a store in a very conservative area of Michigan. While on buying trips to New York clothing showrooms, I was often shown gorgeous, high-style clothing which my Michigan customers would never buy. The salesmen usually said, "Well, you have to educate your customers." This always tickled me... because any customer knows what they like or don't, can afford or not. There is just no way to talk some people into changing their habits. The problem is not in the merchandise (or our art), but in attempting to market it to the wrong customer group.

So, I think it is just a case of finding the right marketing device for the type of work we each do.

Nance

pinkbubelz
10-17-2003, 03:09 PM
I can REALLY relate to the person at the craft show watching snowmen parade past my booth.

At one point, I had decided to try to sell beaded jewelry. My work took a lot of time and I really didn't want to produce just mass-produced items, so I priced my pieces accordingly--in my mind they were not too cheap, yet at the same time, they weren't outrageous either.

The booth next to me sold "crafty" paint-pen decorated lap desks--while on the other side of my booth was someone with "country craft" Christmas ornaments....I was crammed into a corner and across the isle was someone with a staple gun making reindeer crossing signs. Needless to say, no one could see my booth because of the crowd of people waiting for the other 3 booths....

Call me an idiot, but I decided to keep trying for several years with my jewelry-- I learned such things as: 1) try to get a booth across from an aisleway and not in a corner. Near a door is good-- people will always have to pass your booth.

2) people will look at your items and ooh and ah, and then buy the cheapest thing nearest to the edge of the table....OR some $2 trinket for their whiny kid....

After several years of barely breaking even, I stopped showing....
Started doing more fine art works-- paintings, sculptures.

Since then, I've done a couple of art shows outdoors, but have really decided that the arts & crafts show venue is not a good venue for me. I would rather stick with only juried art shows from now on or gallery shows.... I just don't want to have to have my artworks compete with the craft show crowd. It just makes me more frustrated.... Lots of lookers, but not many buyers--unless they are looking for a bargain-- a $5 card to go home and frame...

And, YES, I live in the midwest (Michigan) where for some reason people just don't value art as much as a new pick-up or big screen TV (if you know what I mean)....

I think I WILL try out the idea of taking some pictures of myself as an "artist at work"... that sounds like it would help to give the people an idea of how long an complicated it can be to create a painting-- (i.e. from nailing the canvas to priming to under painting and final painting....well, for the ones I'm making my own canvases for...)

I think we should all REFUSE to become a "slave to the masses" and an "art whore" by just producing stuff solely for selling purposes (and things that we don't believe in.) Instead, I agree whole-heartedly.... Keep our works true to ourselves.... One day the right person will step into our galleries/booths and they will buy the whole lot!

--Iris

P.S. Sorry for the long ramble!

newday
10-18-2003, 01:29 AM
I live in Australia and although we do not have as many art fairs, we are overrun with Art Exhibitions which are run by the Service Clubs e.g. Rotary. Now although they do a great service to the community, they are not Gallery curators and they have work for such a short period of time. Often, frames are collected damaged and you know who has to bear the brunt of the expense of repair. The artist of course.

My other beef is with a local shopkeeper. Notice I call him a shopkeeper, even though he calls his premise an 'Art Gallery'. This man sells paintings, already framed, for under $100.00 AU about $50 US and the rest of the items for sale are prints. i.e. Monet's water lilies, Van Gogh's chair etc. I came out of that shop with steam pouring out of my ears.

I have thought long and hard about this and believe each artist needs to find his/her own water level on this issue. If selling your work for a particular price, to a particular person and while you are doing this, you feel like someone has a hand inside you, twisting your heart around, then you know it does not sit well with your self-esteem. Get the hell out of there, as I did. I go with the idea of the self run Gallery. Especially if you can make ends meet. It also takes time to build up your clientele.

To ease the pressure to sell, why not collaborate with one or two other artists, with whom you get along and whose work sits well with yours. You will share the expenses and receive feedback, which is so important.

Well, as a new poster, I think I've had my two pennies worth. I am off to practise what I preach.

Take care out there.

Newday.

Smileawhyl
10-18-2003, 03:59 AM
Newday :)

I agree, especially with the feeling of someone having their hand inside of you, twisting your heart around. There are so many ways, everyday, that I compromise or just plain don't care about what goes on around me. I keep a fussy girlfriend around to tend to those things. In fact, she and her boyfriend helped move me to my last apartment and while she was marching around giving orders as to where the sofas, chairs and tables should go, all I could do was stand mezmerized by the great light I was getting in that enclosed space.

But when it comes to my artwork, no one else's opinion of its value is important to me. Certainly I like it when others like it, but at the end of the day I've made far more money off of pseudo-art for which I had no emotional investment . . . "practice art" I call it. I do a fair amount of practice art to get to that 'pearl' and that pearl is not going out the door for a wink and handshake money. I have a few pieces on the wall just to remind me, again, of why I must create. The rest, which have not been practice art, have fetched esteem worthy price or reside with those I love purely.

I think you have a good idea about joining forces with a compatible artist in a self-owned gallery setting. I sometimes despise the practical part of myself that says 'you don't want to be indigent when you're older', so to counteract this I am trying to develop a positive reputation among art collectors while balancing out that infernal practical side (which now begins to really encroach on my creative time), hoping that I will find my stride one day out back of that house in the country (with no visible neighbors), painting . . . and only an answering machine away from collectors who will be looking for me.

It may be a dream, but you have to dream it before it can be done. I have much awe and appreciation for the artist who is brave enough to strike out earlier and insist their livelihood will come from their art.

judithj
10-18-2003, 10:21 PM
Originally posted by pinkbubelz


I think we should all REFUSE to become a "slave to the masses" and an "art whore" by just producing stuff solely for selling purposes (and things that we don't believe in.) Instead, I agree whole-heartedly.... Keep our works true to ourselves.... One day the right person will step into our galleries/booths and they will buy the whole lot!

--Iris


Hi Iris!

'Doing it MY Way' :D Just singing that silly song in my head. Sometimes it seems to be at odds with itself - this idea that artists must do their their thing, disregard what people want and yet success depends on selling...

Ida no - perhaps we should be honoured that the folks who buy 2 x 4s painted to be snowmen DON'T buy our work.... :cat:

-jj

DanaT
10-18-2003, 11:27 PM
Hmm, I wonder if the average person doesn't buy fine art because he doesn't know what to do with it. Yeah, I know, you hang paintings on walls, but I was just thinking of my mother who never bought an original artwork in her life until she retired and hired an interior decorator to design her home. Now she's really into it but she said she was always scared before of making a wrong decision.

Given the price of some original oils, that could be a consideration. The customer may not doubt the worth but they don't know what to do with it and they're uneasy with paying that much money for something they like but are not quite sure of what to do with.

Does anyone know how well paintings sell in upscale furniture and accessory boutiques?

Smileawhyl
10-19-2003, 03:12 AM
Originally posted by DanaT
Does anyone know how well paintings sell in upscale furniture and accessory boutiques?

I used to work for an upscale accessories boutique, Sunday Afternoon Interiors, and a modest (as in very small) percentage of what we sold was original artwork, most of that upon the designer's suggestion. However, I used to take my artwork there to be framed and developed a small side business selling florals (I hate painting florals now.) But I do have an image of the painting that started it off. A customer at the store was shopping for something else and saw this picture. The store owner would put out my work when she finished matting and framing it, waiting for me to pick it up. A customer saw it and offered her $150 (This was 20 years ago.) I couldn't sell that one because it was an exercise I did as a water study in a copyrighted book, but I learned to adapt and made a few dollars from she and her friends.

I post the picture as a way of demonstrating the type of style most of the customers felt comfortable with, but as I suggested earlier in the thread, finding a restaurant, doctor's office or other business is a good thing to consider as far as exposure and potential sale. Forgive the fuzzy photograph.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Oct-2003/28371-sterlingRose.jpg

judithj
10-20-2003, 10:27 AM
Originally posted by pinkbubelz
I think we should all REFUSE to become a "slave to the masses" and an "art whore" by just producing stuff solely for selling purposes (and things that we don't believe in.) Instead, I agree whole-heartedly.... Keep our works true to ourselves.... One day the right person will step into our galleries/booths and they will buy the whole lot!--Iris


Iris, your comment has really been on my mind - it is so cool that you were able to say this so well and so concisely. You have inspired me to do a whole lot of thinking...

The concept that we need to be true to our artistic vision is such a beautiful thing to aspire to. The trick is that we need to see clearly where we are being true to our art and where we are using art as a means of acceptance - from ourselves or from others.

The truth of the matter is that we all desperately need to be accepted. We need acceptance mostly from ourselves, but we really do need to have our work accepted and appreciated by our community. We also really need to make a few bucks too.

I know that I have used art to float my self esteem - I suspect that all artists have done this. That is when art stops being fun and becomes a process full of anxiety - creative blocks. It is hard to admit the problem is pride.... for me at least. Hard to look at these emotions clearly at all - much easier to push them away and say "You shouldn't feel that way."

Part of the problem is that artists are creating for themselves - and artists are a UNIQUE market. Most folks just cannot understand what we are doing and it makes them feel insecure.

Making art for the masses is more like writing stories for children than anything else when you really think about it. And children's literature is a great form of art...

Gotta go now - my next projects is to find a few 2 x 4 to paint up as snowmen...

:D :D :D Judith

DanaT
10-20-2003, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by Smileawhyl


... a modest (as in very small) percentage of what we sold was original artwork, most of that upon the designer's suggestion.

Yes, that was my mom's experience too. I think the average person thinks of fine art like wine. They enjoy it when its someone elses but they feel too inadequate to make a purchasing decision themselves. But if they have an expert - a sommelier or an interior designer - it makes the decision making process less scary for them.

paintergirl
10-27-2003, 09:58 AM
I loved that 'slave to the masses' comment ...;)

I am living rural due to my husbands employment, ( honestly thought I was dropped off in some sort of an artist's purgatory at one point...:rolleyes: ) There isn't a fine art show/venue for many hours drive...The closest thing to a show here is the craft shows, so I know all about how well the 'gimmick' items sell...lol

It took me a few years but I have cultivated collectors in these parts...but in large part it meant ditching my shyness and being more open about what I do, iniating conversation on this at any given chance. My income this year rivals when I was in the city with the venues handy, but it is all through word-of-mouth sales and minimal but well utilized advertising. It took a while, but it happened.

Dana was on target with her comment about fine art and fine wine. I have turned many non-art buyers into buyers and repeat buyers. In an area where a $20 walmart print is considered art, there are people here hanging originals now that were bought well into the several hundreds+ . There have been repeat buyers and these previous clients also now explore other artists work as well , it is not as intimidating to them anymore.
( I consider that a good karma/brotherhood thing, I promote the other artists I know of in these parts)

The hardest part for me has been to open up my painting time and to some degree, my life- of which I am very guarded of, I crave the privacy...and let people in, often strangers...but people like to see an artist at work...they admire and respect the process. Possibly consider having a piece on the go so that when times are slow and someone peaks in, they see you at work. It will surprise you by just how interested people are in our creative process...

B.t.w...bad shows, weekends, festivals happen to us all...loved the tar and feather suggestion...hehe

Phranque
10-29-2003, 09:45 PM
I'm not sure if I'm in agreement about the public not beeing educateable (like the made-up word?:D )
I think sometimes people need food for thought about art.

I have done the show thing all summer. I went to the first (two day event), sold nothing, second (one day event), sold about seven, third (weeklong event) sold ONE. Since then I have been promoting my pet portraits all of July and August, along with having floral paintings for sale, selling one all that time. Now I have clients coming out of the woodwork, getting two to three commissions a week. Keep plugging away, STICK WITH YOUR DREAM!!!!

judithj
10-30-2003, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by paintergirl
I have turned many non-art buyers into buyers and repeat buyers. In an area where a $20 walmart print is considered art, there are people here hanging originals now that were bought well into the several hundreds+ . There have been repeat buyers and these previous clients also now explore other artists work as well , it is not as intimidating to them anymore.
( I consider that a good karma/brotherhood thing, I promote the other artists I know of in these parts)


Hi Julia!

Could you share your process for how to turn non-art buyers into buyers and repeat buyers? Sounds like you really have an handle on personal selling.

Thanks, Judith

judithj
10-30-2003, 11:41 AM
Originally posted by Frank van Boxtel
STICK WITH YOUR DREAM!!!!

Hi Franciscus

:clap: :clap: :clap:

Thanks for the encouragement!

Warmest Regards, Judith

Bill J
10-31-2003, 03:57 PM
As far as outdoor art shows I've found that 99% come for feebie entertainment with no intention of buying. I have a friend who has a "spiral potatoe stand( fried potatoes) He gets $3.00 a clip for them and usually walks away with over $2.000.00 a day . Although he is an artist he would never thing of showing anything at these shows. There are 2 groups that make the money -promoters and food concessions period.

bill

JohnEmmett
11-07-2003, 03:06 AM
Professional gamblers don't really judge their success by money. They evaluate how they played their cards. It's not about luck to them... and the rules of play they use I'm not going to go into. But if they lost while playing the way they should, they know they really succeeded. If they won while playing poorly... vice versa.

If you paint what you love to paint, this is your success, whether or not you are judged by anyone as a success. Beyond that... anything is just good.

JohnEmmett
11-07-2003, 03:19 AM
Originally posted by lisilk
I also have done outdoor shows where I had a scrapbooking booth on one side and a booth that sold wood pens made from kits on the other. They couldn't wrap up their work fast enough while I sat there with my hand painted silks and sold almost none. I was so upset !!!!

I don't wish to be critical of anything you choose to do. My intent here is only to help...

Are you aware of how the public percieves silk paintings? If you are that's good and fine. It's bad of me to say anything but I feel bad not to.

Silk paintings have a bad aura about them with the public. If you're upset then that's where I step in and say something. If you do what you want as an artist and are not upset by reactions, do what you want I say. But if you care about how people react, choose to paint canvas because that's considered art with all while silk paintings are not.

If you think that's just my opinion, ask around. Really, I didn't invent my own opinion on this. If you wish to be accepted... play the game.

Smileawhyl
11-07-2003, 03:59 AM
Originally posted by jemmett


I don't wish to be critical of anything you choose to do. My intent here is only to help...

Are you aware of how the public percieves silk paintings? If you are that's good and fine. It's bad of me to say anything but I feel bad not to.

Silk paintings have a bad aura about them with the public. If you're upset then that's where I step in and say something. If you do what you want as an artist and are not upset by reactions, do what you want I say. But if you care about how people react, choose to paint canvas because that's considered art with all while silk paintings are not.

If you think that's just my opinion, ask around. Really, I didn't invent my own opinion on this. If you wish to be accepted... play the game.

That is a valid point. It is honest to say, 'I have created this because I want someone to buy it', as it is also honest to say, 'I have created this and I want you to like it enough to buy it'. Honest to acknowledge to yourself that on the one hand you are catering to the public taste, on the other hand wanting public taste to cater to you.

Keith H. who started this thread made a good point about not gauging your success as an artist on sales. It seems to be the difference between publicly accepted and being publicly distinctive. The distinction sets you apart and while the clientele is more scares, the pearls are always larger (and willing to pay more) than the grains of sand.

Elankat
11-07-2003, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by jemmett
But if you care about how people react, choose to paint canvas because that's considered art with all while silk paintings are not.

:rolleyes:

pampe
11-07-2003, 10:46 PM
Originally posted by jemmett

If you paint what you love to paint, this is your success, whether or not you are judged by anyone as a success. Beyond that... anything is just good.

That part I agree with......tho it does not pay the bills, it's all you can do

anything else is gimmick and smoke n mirrors

I tired to paint nudes when I wasn't selling because THEY DO...I hated it, it showed, they DID NOT sell

orbisomnis
11-23-2003, 09:59 PM
pinkbubelz.

I think you are going to be a favorite of mine. I agree with your views on what craft and our art DO NOT have in common. As a person who worked in the "craft industry" paid by the hour, for five years...I know the differences very well.

In my opinion the product I produced, was not art at all. I got most of my inspiration from the competitions catalogs... my designs were recycled fads, nothing I really wanted to draw or paint. Oh, some would tell a different story at some of the CRAFT shows but. . . well. . . I became disgusted with the whole enterprise.

I hate the words 'craft industry'...

orbis

Keith Russell
11-26-2003, 01:33 AM
When Leonardo painted the Mona Lisa, it was art.

When someone copies it--even if they do it very well--its craft.

IMO, of course...

K

mad_hatter62
12-13-2003, 07:50 PM
I've had little sales but continue to work. It is frustraiting. Especially when I know if I changed my subject matter, to what is cute or popular, I could sale a lot. It's a two edge sword. I would be able to make a living at my work, but at what cost? I think the best thing about my work is the fact that I do it to please me. If I make a sale or even just get a compliment on it...BONUS!!! I have posted in my studio a quote from the artist Thomas Hart Benton...

The only way an artist can fail is to quit working.

This keeps me going....

Be true to yourself, it makes the sales all that more sweet!!!!

good luck...

it'sALLart
12-14-2003, 11:13 AM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
When Leonardo painted the Mona Lisa, it was art.

When someone copies it--even if they do it very well--its craft.

IMO, of course...

K

I respectfully disagree, Keith.

If they paint a copy of the Mona Lisa, it's practice. It might be better or worse than the original but.... personally, I still think they are practicing art because many students have been copying the masters for centuries and what they turn out is and was still considered art, be it bad or good.

If they make a Mona Lisa out of popsicle sticks and buttons, it might be ingenious but THAT is craft. Or carve her out of styrofoam. Hmmm...

If they sprinkle glitter on it, then it's just plain tacky. :D