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opainter
12-18-2014, 10:58 PM
It seems easy and natural to make acrylics more transparent - just add some medium to them.

But I want to make acrylics that are already transparent or semi-transparent (because their pigments are this way) more opaque. Some examples of such colors are Perylene Red (PR149), Potter's Pink (PR233), and Transparent Yellow (or Azo Condensation Yellow) (PY128). (Potter's Pink is semi-opaque, but I would like to make it more opaque if this is possible.) Is there some medium, other than an opaque paint, that can be mixed with these colors to make them more opaque?

Gigalot
12-19-2014, 05:25 AM
Opaque Acrylic said to be hard to make. :) The binder can't carry high amount of pigments.. In oil I have Opaquer Red iron oxide, Chromium Oxide green, Mars Black, Caput-Mortuum, Titanium White, Cobalt chromite blue-green, Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Red in high pigmented, artist's grade form. I also can use a trick to add Aluminum flakes powder to paint. It gives high opacity to a mixtures.

Mythrill
12-19-2014, 07:50 AM
It seems easy and natural to make acrylics more transparent - just add some medium to them.

But I want to make acrylics that are already transparent or semi-transparent (because their pigments are this way) more opaque. Some examples of such colors are Perylene Red (PR149), Potter's Pink (PR233), and Transparent Yellow (or Azo Condensation Yellow) (PY128). (Potter's Pink is semi-opaque, but I would like to make it more opaque if this is possible.) Is there some medium, other than an opaque paint, that can be mixed with these colors to make them more opaque?
Hi, opainter!

The most common way to make your pigments more opaque is to add Titanium White (PW 6) to your paint. Then, cover everything as necessary and glaze with your transparent color until everything is rich and saturated.

A more sophisticated option is to paint with a color known to be opaque in acrylics that is close to your transparent color and then glaze with your transparent color. One example would be painting with opaque Yellow Iron Oxide (PY 42) and glazing with Transparent Yellow (PY 128).

That also leads me to Gigalot's statement:


Opaque Acrylic said to be hard to make. :) The binder can't carry high amount of pigments.. In oil I have Opaquer Red iron oxide, Chromium Oxide green, Mars Black, Caput-Mortuum, Titanium White, Cobalt chromite blue-green, Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Red in high pigmented, artist's grade form. I also can use a trick to add Aluminum flakes powder to paint. It gives high opacity to a mixtures.

Giga, it's true that acrylics are harder to make opaque than oils. However, all the colors you have mentioned are opaque in acrylics. Those colors is that they probably disperse better in water. Since they have high solubility and their particles are really small, you can cram as much paint as you want into acrylic film.

An example of pigment that's probably not as easily soluble in water is Cerulean Blue (PB 35). However, its variant, Cerulean Blue Chromium and the much bluer variant, Cobalt Chromite Blue (both PB 36), have increased pigment load in acrylics.

DMSS
12-19-2014, 10:14 AM
Mythrill:Great tips.

opainter
12-19-2014, 09:02 PM
Hi, Mythrill!


The most common way to make your pigments more opaque is to add Titanium White (PW 6) to your paint. Then, cover everything as necessary and glaze with your transparent color until everything is rich and saturated.

A more sophisticated option is to paint with a color known to be opaque in acrylics that is close to your transparent color and then glaze with your transparent color. One example would be painting with opaque Yellow Iron Oxide (PY 42) and glazing with Transparent Yellow (PY 128).

I was thinking somewhat along the same lines, but instead of glazing with the transparent color (which is an added step), tinting with it instead. Unfortunately, there are limits to how dark one is going to be able to get the paint, considering the white that is already in it. So, I must overcome my squeamishness :eek: about glazing colors and, as the motivational coaches will tell you, "Just do it!" :D

I had always thought of glazing as something that was done to an entire painting, but in this case, one would apply glaze on a color-by-color basis? :confused:

PB29
12-21-2014, 10:46 PM
I believe Golden Molding paste is made of marble dust mixed into a gel medium, and might make acrylic colors more opaque. I've been meaning to try this myself; thanks for reminding me about this!

opainter
12-21-2014, 11:10 PM
I believe Golden Molding paste is made of marble dust mixed into a gel medium, and might make acrylic colors more opaque. I've been meaning to try this myself; thanks for reminding me about this!
Thanks for the tip. (And you're welcome for the reminder!)

Has anyone tried either of Golden's "Molding Paste" or "Light Molding Paste"? Or any other molding or modeling paste (not just Golden products)? Would use of white gesso be as effective? What might you recommend?

Mythrill
12-22-2014, 07:12 PM
I had always thought of glazing as something that was done to an entire painting, but in this case, one would apply glaze on a color-by-color basis? :confused:

Hi, opainter!

Yes, that is correct. Glazing just means applying one color on the top of the another dry color. Colors mix only optically, and you can glaze a whole painting or just a small section, and as many times as you want provided that the underlayers are stable enough.

In the case of acrylics, upper layers will always be flexible, so that's not really an issue. If you are using oils, it's best if the underlayer is a fast-drying paint (e.g, an umber layer). Slower-drying layers must come on the top of the other.

opainter
12-23-2014, 01:00 AM
Hi, Mythrill!

Good! Thanks for the information!

opainter
12-29-2014, 10:08 PM
Another person asked this same question over in the Acrylics forum (which might be where it more properly belongs). Oddly enough, it seems that I was one of the persons who at least attempted to answer this question! (Link to that thread. (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1360912))

Just goes to show you that people can become forgetful! :eek:

By the way, Mythrill, thanks for answering this question now twice!!

Mythrill
12-30-2014, 09:08 PM
Another person asked this same question over in the Acrylics forum (which might be where it more properly belongs). Oddly enough, it seems that I was one of the persons who at least attempted to answer this question! (Link to that thread. (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1360912))

Just goes to show you that people can become forgetful! :eek:

By the way, Mythrill, thanks for answering this question now twice!!

Hi, opainter!

I don't mind answering these questions if it helps clarifying things to people. :)

opainter
12-31-2014, 01:48 AM
Hi, opainter!

I don't mind answering these questions if it helps clarifying things to people. :)
Just give me enough time, and I'll probably ask this question again! :clear:

Maybe by then, people will have thought up of different answers!!

WaltWally
01-02-2015, 02:25 PM
I'm a big fan of glazing! One can achieve the necessary opacity with lower chroma paints, and then bring them up to the almost stained-glass brlilliance one is aiming for.

It also allows one to endlessly second-guess oneself. This can be good or bad.

From Golden Acrylics chart of their Heavy Body line:
Their 108 colors, ranked by opacity (1 to 8 scale):

1 (MOST OPAQUE)
Chromium Oxide Green Dark
Chromium Oxide Green
Yellow Oxide
Red Oxide
Violet Oxide
Raw Umber
Carbon Black
Mars Black

2
C.P. Cadmium Red Light *
C.P. Cadmium Red Medium *
C.P. Cadmium Red Dark *
Pyrrole Red Dark *
Light Magenta *
Medium Magenta
Medium Violet *
Light Violet *
Light Ultramarine Blue
Cobalt Blue Hue
Anthraquinone Blue
Prussian Blue Hue *
Cerulean Blue Deep
Cobalt Turquois
Teal
Light Turquois (Phthalo)
Cobalt Green
Jenkins Green
Light Green (Yellow Shade) *
Yellow Ochre
Mars Yellow
Burnt Sienna
Burnt Umber Light
Burnt Umber
Bone Black
Paynes Gray
Titan Buff
Naples Yellow Hue
Titanium White
N2 Neutral Gray
N3 Neutral Gray
N4 Neutral Gray
N5 Neutral Gray
N6 Neutral Gray
N7 Neutral Gray
N8 Neutral Gray


3
Titanate Yellow
Bismuth Vanadate Yellow
C.P. Cadmium Yellow Medium *
Cadmium Yellow Medium Hue *
C.P. Cadmium Yellow Dark *
C.P. Cadmium Orange *
Pyrrole Red Light
Pyrrole Red
Cadmium Red Medium Hue *
Permanent Maroon
Permanent Violet Dark
Cobalt Violet Hue *
Dioxazine Purple *
Cobalt Blue
Cerulean Blue, Chromium
Phthalo Blue (Red Shade)
Phthalo Blue (Green Shade)
Primary Cyan
Turquois (Phthalo)
Phthalo Green (Blue Shade)
Viridian Green Hue
Phthalo Green (Yellow Shade)
Permanent Green Light *
Hookers Green Hue
Sap Green Hue
Light Green (Blue Shade) *
Raw Sienna
VanDyke Brown Hue
Graphite Gray


4
C.P. Cadmium Yellow Primrose *
C.P. Cadmium Yellow Light *
Aureolin Hue *
Naphthol Red Light *
Primary Magenta
Alizarin Crimson Hue
Quinacridone Violet
Manganese Blue Hue
Green Gold *
Transparent Brown Iron Oxide


5
Hansa Yellow Opaque
Quinacridone Burnt Orange
Diarylide Yellow
Vat Orange
Pyrrole Orange *
Naphthol Red Medium *
Quinacridone Crimson
Ultramarine Violet *
Azurite Hue
Terre Verte Hue


6
Hansa Yellow Light *
Primary Yellow *
Quinacridone / Nickel Azo Gold
Quinacridone Red
Smalt Hue *
Ultramarine Blue *


7
Hansa Yellow Medium
Nickel Azo Yellow
Indian Yellow Hue
Quinacridone Red Light
Quinacridone Magenta
Zinc White


8
Transparent Pyrrole Orange *
Transparent Yellow Iron Oxide
Transparent Red Iron Oxide


The asterisks note paints that did not get BOTH 'lightfastness I' AND 'excellent' in Permanence. Golden's website gives the most complete data on their paints that I've ever seen. (Does any other maker use an eight-point scale for opacity/transparency?)

Except for the cadmiums ('not for exterior use') the more opaque pigments are also the most permanent - and cheapest, most being 'earth' tones.

Mario_K
02-14-2018, 08:39 AM
Does it matter if my white is not titanium white if I want to make transparent colours more opaque? I have a tub of white which I need to finish before buying titanium.

tiago.dagostini
02-14-2018, 09:34 AM
Does it matter if my white is not titanium white if I want to make transparent colours more opaque? I have a tub of white which I need to finish before buying titanium.


It changes a lot if your white is zync white or titanium white. Zync is very transparent, while titanium is rather opaque. That said, most UNAMED white tubes are titanium white.

KolinskyRed
02-14-2018, 01:12 PM
Hello, here's quote from Golden's site that supports the above suggestion:

"When the desired outcome is to extend the paint without increasing transparency, or specifically to increase opacity, then the addition of Molding Paste is beneficial. While there are some products available that are marketed specifically to increase opacity of paints, GOLDEN Molding Paste works equally well for this purpose. It must be understood that the addition of such products will result in a color shift to a lower chroma (and possibly lighter value) color."

I have played with this, but not in a finished painting - just swatches ages ago.

Instead of white paint, if that's the route, how about the gesso from Liquitex (their different grades have different amounts of "chaulkiness"). The Golden Gesso has a lot of polymer, little "chaulk" by comparison (fabulous for prepping/sealing supports).

The other thing I'm wondering about is the Golden lines of Matte paints. Matte Paint lines are described as desirable for their matte sheen and opacity. But how opaque, I wonder? where:

"... they provide a uniform flat finish in a wide variety of concentrated colors. A matte finish can also be achieved by adding Matte Medium to acrylic colors, but this decreases the color strength. Our Matte colors are formulated to preserve color strength by using a matting agent and pigment concentration comparable to standard Heavy Body and Fluid Acrylic colors."

Artists can add their Matte High-Solid Gel for the increase in opacity that comes with increase matte finish - though we get the contraction of colour gamut more so than if we let the company do it with their Matte Paint lines. The High-Solid Gel has very interesting features.



Wally - excellent list!

Cheers

Mario_K
02-14-2018, 08:30 PM
It changes a lot if your white is zync white or titanium white. Zync is very transparent, while titanium is rather opaque. That said, most UNAMED white tubes are titanium white.

Thank you.
The tub I have does not say anything, does not have the pigment code either.

tiago.dagostini
02-15-2018, 06:49 AM
Thank you.
The tub I have does not say anything, does not have the pigment code either.


That probably means that very likely is not a high grade brand / line of paint. That usually means a smaller load of pigment and that can make it look more transparent. While you do not need premium materials for learning, it is good to get to average quality level material at least as soon as possible.

Gigalot
02-15-2018, 07:08 AM
Paint manufacturers must compose "Even more heavy body", "even more pigmented Titanium White". They must add A LOT of Titanium White to paint and must use LOTS of extremely opaque pigments. Chrome Oxide; Iron Oxide Red, Violet, Orange and Black. Unfortunatelly, Cadmium Yellow is only opaque paint...I know thousand attempts to Ban it, to replace it, to forget it and to demonize it!
But NOPE, if we need OPACITY we need HEAVY PIGMENTED CADMIUM! :crying: :crying: :crying: :crying: :crying: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :lol: Try SANS CADMIUMS instead! The word "SANS" when used instead off word "HUE" can make paint to be more opaque! :) Finally, we can try to change painting technique and try to use as much as possible Titanium White as it is a reasonable additive that can give Opacity to paint.

tiago.dagostini
02-15-2018, 08:17 AM
Paint manufacturers must compose "Even more heavy body", "even more pigmented Titanium White". They must add A LOT of Titanium White to paint and must use LOTS of extremely opaque pigments. Chrome Oxide; Iron Oxide Red, Violet, Orange and Black. Unfortunatelly, Cadmium Yellow is only opaque paint...I know thousand attempts to Ban it, to replace it, to forget it and to demonize it!
But NOPE, if we need OPACITY we need HEAVY PIGMENTED CADMIUM! :crying: :crying: :crying: :crying: :crying: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :lol: Try SANS CADMIUMS instead! The word "SANS" when used instead off word "HUE" can make paint to be more opaque! :) Finally, we can try to change painting technique and try to use as much as possible Titanium White as it is a reasonable additive that can give Opacity to paint.

well You can always paint gouache to have the genera; tone with lot of opacity then make a glaze with acrylic over it for final touch (note.. I have never tried it.. just theorycrafting)

Gigalot
02-17-2018, 06:04 AM
well You can always paint gouache to have the genera; tone with lot of opacity then make a glaze with acrylic over it for final touch (note.. I have never tried it.. just theorycrafting)
We can always make opacity by using two layers of paint or more. But in sacrifice of working time and painting energy because we must paint twice what we can paint one time. Modern organic color are manufactured for layered technique unless very thick impasto. Ready to overpaint one subject many times and waste all that "times", or use awful daub impasto to make strong opacity and textures. :lol:
The last idea can give time economy but waste our paint. Since Chinese paint became cheaper, we can squeeze it a lot. Some artists use Calcium Carbonate addition to make our world to be less expensive.
Art is developing in unpredictable way and modern non-toxic chemistry regulation is a kind of art's gateway!

tiago.dagostini
02-19-2018, 07:38 AM
We can always make opacity by using two layers of paint or more. But in sacrifice of working time and painting energy because we must paint twice what we can paint one time. Modern organic color are manufactured for layered technique unless very thick impasto. Ready to overpaint one subject many times and waste all that "times", or use awful daub impasto to make strong opacity and textures. :lol:
The last idea can give time economy but waste our paint. Since Chinese paint became cheaper, we can squeeze it a lot. Some artists use Calcium Carbonate addition to make our world to be less expensive.
Art is developing in unpredictable way and modern non-toxic chemistry regulation is a kind of art's gateway!


Well since I work mostly in indirect way, layering was never something I considered a waste of time. But I can see that or someone wanting productivity (I am just an amateur that paints for self satisfaction), more opacity would be welcome.

Richard P
02-19-2018, 06:56 PM
IF you are painting in one layer only then try painting over a white background compared to a toned colour. It can be harder to judge values but the white helps with doing light values like yellows and whites which is where acrylics are less opaque. Iron Oxide black (even some of the carbon blacks) means dark colours can be made opaque than lighter ones..