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DMSS
11-18-2014, 09:40 AM
Is there any difference in the pigment loads between artist-quality acrylics and artist-quality oils? Does anyone know of any articles on this? Does the answer vary by pigment?

Mythrill
11-18-2014, 10:54 AM
Is there any difference in the pigment loads between artist-quality acrylics and artist-quality oils? Does anyone know of any articles on this? Does the answer vary by pigment?

DMSS, yes, there is. Acrylic binders take less pigments for several different reasons. One, for example, is film stability. You have to make sure the pigment you will store won't go bad. It's also harder to find student-grade acrylics with good load. This is why you should prefer artist-grade acrylics whenever possible.

If you choose student-grade acrylics, try to choose colors that are known to have a higher tinting strength, e.g, phthalos, ochres, Titanium White (PW 6), etc. That way, you are more likely to get a good tube at a decent price.

DMSS
11-18-2014, 12:00 PM
Thanks, Mythrill. I only use artist grade. Mostly Golden, some Liquitex, some M. Graham. I have some Tri-Art, which I don't particularly care for. So, then, do you see a difference in quality of color between oils and artist quality acrylics? If so, any way to compensate for this when using acrylics?

Mythrill
11-18-2014, 02:11 PM
Thanks, Mythrill. I only use artist grade. Mostly Golden, some Liquitex, some M. Graham. I have some Tri-Art, which I don't particularly care for. So, then, do you see a difference in quality of color between oils and artist quality acrylics? If so, any way to compensate for this when using acrylics?
DMSS, I don't know about M. Graham, as I never tried one of their tubes, but Golden and Liquitex are among the best brands, overall. I particularly like some colors from Winsor & Newton, but some tubes have spoiled on me (their consistency got progressively bad).

As for color, yes. Acrylics are inherently less saturated in masstone than oils are. However, if you seal the surface properly, they don't yellow, and they are incredibly bright in masstone.

To make up for the lesser saturation in masstone acrylics have, first of all, you have to seal your surface with gesso. Sealing the surface increases the amount of paint it can absorb, giving you much deeper, brighter color. This also works for oils, by the way. :)

Another important technique is to take advantage of glazing. Just working opaquely won't bring you rich colors: instead, prime the surface with a tint of the final color you want.

For example: say you want the final color to look like the masstone of a very bright Cadmium Yellow Lemon (PY 35). Prime the surface with a very light tint of Cadmium Yellow Lemon + Titanium White (PW 6), and then glaze with a pure layer of Cadmium Yellow Lemon (PY 35).

This is also works for many techniques, and it's how old masters achieved their color brilliance just with colors like Vermillion (PR 106), Yellow Ochre (PY 43), Lamp Black (PBk 9), and Lead White (PW 1) and/or another translucent white.

Glazing has many other advantages, such as easily reproducing natural light effects and preventing more fragile colors from fading. Van Eyck prevented natural Indigo from fading by glazing over it with Lapis Lazuli (PB 29, natural). When I use Dioxazine Violet (PV 23) in tints, I particularly like to glaze over it with Ultramarine Violet (PV 15).

Patrick1
11-19-2014, 03:18 AM
So, then, do you see a difference in quality of color between oils and artist quality acrylics? If so, any way to compensate for this when using acrylics?
I recently started a thread about this topic, more or less.

Even though artist-quality acrylics are less highly pigmented than artist-quality oils, I've found top-quality acrylics to be completely satisfactory in pigment load.

On the other hand, I've found most student-grade acrylics to be unsatisfactory in this regard. BUT...I've found most student-grade oils to be very satisfactory...and IMO they are the best value in terms of pigmentation and color intensity per dollar. Just my humble observations.

Gigalot
11-19-2014, 05:09 AM
they are the best value in terms of pigmentation and color intensity per dollar.
And per Yuan! :lol:

DMSS
11-19-2014, 08:47 AM
I recently started a thread about this topic, more or less.
I had missed that one. Just found and read it. Thanks.