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Barbara WC
11-17-2014, 08:11 PM
I gave my niece "the other half" sticks of my Rembrandt pastels to work with- she is enjoying them.

I'd like to get her something a little softer to try as a Christmas present, but not sure super soft (she likes to paint animals and people).

She is only 13 yrs old, so staying with pastels that don't use heavy metals is a must. I also don't want to spend a fortune.

I'm looking at the Munguyo pastel line. I've tried their hand rolled, and like them okay, what about their regular "soft pastels" line, they come in round and square. There is a 72 piece square set in a wood box for a great price linked here: http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discount-art-supplies/pastels/soft-pastels/mungyo-gallery-soft-pastels-squares-and-sets/mungyo-gallery-soft-pastel-square-sets.htm

Has anyone tried the square Mungyos or the round ones? I've tried the handrolled soft Mungyos, and like them okay too, but wanted to ask about their other line of soft pastels. Are they too much like Rembrandt in texture?

bnoonan
11-17-2014, 08:30 PM
No experience - haven't tried them. good luck tho!:thumbsup:

mudfish
11-17-2014, 09:01 PM
I got the squares for teaching. They are quite hard, more like NuPastel or Rembies. Its a good color range.

Barbara WC
11-17-2014, 09:53 PM
Mudfish- do you think the square Mungyos are different enough from Rembrandts to warrant purchasing?

I think that wood box set would be sweet for my niece, but I don't want to get her something so similar to Rembrandts...

Maybe I should consider Nupastels, hadn't thought of that. She might like those for details...

allydoodle
11-17-2014, 09:56 PM
A student of mine was using these for the longest time, (http://www.amazon.com/Loew-Cornell-Soft-Half-Pastels-64-Count/dp/B00366PYMO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416275749&sr=8-1&keywords=loew+cornell+pastels)and they're not terrible for beginners. They're not expensive either, they might be something for you to consider.

mudfish
11-18-2014, 12:03 AM
I don't think they are much different, Barbara, and prefer the Rembies myself. Maybe a few Senns for her? They are softer and not too expensive.

robertsloan2
11-18-2014, 05:16 AM
I've got a set of 48 soft squares and love them for my sketching set. A friend gave it to me and I use them a lot on the Bee Bogus Recycled Rough Sketch paper. Nice medium soft leaning soft texture, square shape makes blocky strokes possible, much softer than hard pastels and non toxic, also lightfast. They would be great pastels to get for a 13 year old.

They are very similar to Rembrandt texture though. A bit softer, which may mean more binder. Slightly softer than the soft rounds that I considered comparable to Rembrandt. The 72 color set has the advantage of a sturdy case, I like those veneer-MDF and molding wood boxes.

Great American half sticks maybe? Dakota lists them as softer than Sennelier though. So that leaves Sennelier half sticks - 40 of them is about the same price range and a decent color range in a manageable box.

The other thing about the Mungyo Soft Squares is that they have got the square shape. The blocky strokes possible with Blue Earths or Terry Ludwigs are possible with them, which may be enough difference combined with the price to make them a very useful adjunct to her Rembrandt halves. I'll have to get out both boxes at the same time and try them to see if there's much difference. Dakota surprised me by listing Sennelier as firmer than GA, so GA half sticks was my other suggestion.

Modestly priced extra soft, I'd say Sennelier half sticks are a good bargain and a good introduction to the "Softer range" without spending a fortune. Or hand rolled, but the hand rolled brands tend to be expensive.

Mount Vision are wonderful but much more expensive. They would fall just right in the "Softer but not super soft" category and introduce a hand rolled texture. Given the price of those you might have to pick out an assortment of colors most likely to be needed after the tooth is full - last accent colors, combination of darks and lights with a few mid tones. Better range to get her the Senneliers and let her find out that super soft can be useful.

Also, Senneliers do teach you to have a light hand. They've got their uses.

Chris's link to the Loew Cornell student half sticks was cool. That's very similar to the Mungyo Standard 64 half sticks set, which I found very useful for color studies, sketching and teaching. I was seriously considering buying those in bulk if I get my pastels class going this year at one or the other of two senior centers. It would keep the materials cost down to under $20 with paper and kneaded erasers and charcoal pencils.

http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discount-art-supplies/pastels/soft-pastels/mungyo-gallery-soft-pastels-squares-and-sets/standard-soft-pastel-sets.htm

Six of one, half a dozen of the other, except that I know the Mungyo packaging has a sturdy box with cardboard sleeve to keep it from falling open and don't know if Loew Cornell's box is more like their oil pastels box, with the tray sliding out of a less sturdy cardboard box. Slightly cheaper for the Mungyo. Very cool little assortment. If I get them for the class I'll replace mine.

Well, that wandered all over the place and didn't help much. But I would consider whether the slightly softer plus square shape might be enough difference - also the big range. How many Rembrandts has she got? More colors does help with a beginner.

I'd definitely consider the cheap 64 student sticks as a stocking stuffer because that's a lot of colors in a very small, portable box and something to work out ideas with in a sketchbook without worrying about using up the good pastels. They were darn handy.

SAS Designs
11-18-2014, 10:44 AM
Have you considered DB 1/2 sticks? I think someone wrote they were Daler Rowney brand.
I've just ordered a 1/2 stick set. Benefit, no wrapping. Yikes, I do not like the DB paper wrappings on their whole sticks.
suzy

Barbara WC
11-18-2014, 11:48 AM
Robert has me leaning towards the square Mungyo sticks in the wood box. I might also get her some pastel pencils...

So hard to decide! I'm not sure she'd appreciate the real softies yet, like Sennelier, but she is really doing well with the Rembrandts that I'd like to expand her range a bit- I gave her 45 of half of my Rembrandts, around the color wheel, including some grays and neutrals. She is still rendering more than she is using expressive strokes, which is okay, she is learning more about proportions and color...

I wish I lived closer to her, or that someone in my family was an artist! My family keeps buying her student grade or kiddie stuff, and she said to me the colors just aren't intense enough, and she doesn't like the quality. She was so thankful to me for the Rembrandts- she came to visit this summer- she is in Texas, I'm in California- and we got to work a little bit together. She's really amazing- when she saw that I use blues and violets in my shadows, even on skin in portraits- she said she couldn't believe it- because those are the colors she sees in shadows and she thought it was her imagination. I didn't learn to "see" reflected light until I took a class...

GeslinaM
11-18-2014, 04:38 PM
Barbara, I think good quality is best, though you want to be age appropriate. Cheap supplies just don't give as good of a result, and many students or beginners give up too easily. That being said, I would not buy a 13 year old Ludwigs...(haha, if I was spending that much, it would be for me!). I have nieces that are artistically inclined, and even at a very young age, they could tell the difference between good and cheapo kid stuff!

Anything mid range, like Great Americans, are nice, and I think a kid would get a kick out of the color names. I also think the sennelier half stick sets are a great value, around $110 for 80, and Unison sells a 30 half stick set for about $75.

Still-trying
11-18-2014, 05:37 PM
Maybe you could help her make a "wish list" that she could show to her family. To help her get a better grade of goodies.

JustinM
11-20-2014, 08:09 PM
Mudfish- do you think the square Mungyos are different enough from Rembrandts to warrant purchasing? .

They are waaaaay different than the Rembrandts, yes. I use these (the Mungyo squares) for underpaintings quite often. They lay down colour very nicely and are much better than any other set ive seen in their price range. I think they'd be difficult for most to do a complete painting with but they compliment a medium soft set like Rembrandts very nicely.

Interestingly, Mungyo makes several lines. their cheap grade (which are not very good imho) then the semi-hard (which compare favourably with nupastels) , these soft pastel (squares) which are pretty 'hard' for soft pastels but really work nicely for sketching and underpaintings.

Then their top 2 lines: the artists rounds which are very similar to rembrandts (thinner & they feel a touch harder to me but very very close) and their handmade (which are big & fat sort of like unison or richeson).

A very interesting line & certainly worth trying.

Moises Menendez
12-13-2014, 06:08 AM
Although I have other brands of soft and hard pastels, I noticed that the semi-hard pastel from Mungyo are great for fine details especially for portraits, in MPO.
I know they are at the bottom of the list when it comes to quality, according to past reviews, but i like them. They are softer than the hard Nupastel pastels. In fact, I purchased the box of 72 pastels recently. For a beginner it would be a good asset since the wrapping paper has imprinted the color hue. I like this feature since when I apply certain color I know the particular value and hue.

Barbara WC
12-13-2014, 07:05 AM
Moe- do you have the round or square Mungyo pastels? I ended up getting my niece a half stick set of Blick artist pastels- they were a good price!

But I am considering getting a Mungyo set for myself to sketch with. The square pastels appeal to me...

Moises Menendez
12-13-2014, 07:44 AM
I got the square pastels. Well, I noticed you are like me, an early bird..Ah? It is 5.45AM here in Arkansas, and ready to go to work. Have a nice day.

Barbara WC
12-13-2014, 01:53 PM
I got the square pastels. Well, I noticed you are like me, an early bird..Ah? It is 5.45AM here in Arkansas, and ready to go to work. Have a nice day.

LOL! Couldn't be further from the truth- I'm actually in Spain right now! Lucky if I normally roll out of bed at 7 am :lol:

Moises Menendez
12-13-2014, 02:53 PM
Que bien, con razón me llamo la atención ya que tu zona era de California. De todas maneras: Hasta la vista, y feliz Navidad!

JustinM
12-13-2014, 03:38 PM
Although I have other brands of soft and hard pastels, I noticed that the semi-hard pastel from Mungyo are great for fine details especially for portraits, in MPO.
I know they are at the bottom of the list when it comes to quality, according to past reviews, but i like them. They are softer than the hard Nupastel pastels. In fact, I purchased the box of 72 pastels recently. For a beginner it would be a good asset since the wrapping paper has imprinted the color hue. I like this feature since when I apply certain color I know the particular value and hue.

Actually, aside from the really cheap ones ( like the 64 1/2 stick set) they are usually reviewed pretty favourably. The semi hard are, as you eluded, a really nice set & I prefer them to nupastels (which have their own issues with lightfastness).

jakertanner
12-13-2014, 05:13 PM
Barbara, I have all three of the Mungyo gallery line. The squares are nice, especially their earth tones, but they are softer than Nu pastels for sure. I love their super soft round sticks...not the hand rolled. The soft sticks are nice, and there is a particular sky blue color that I love..they release a decent amount of pigment too...much more than the square versions. For the price, I would definitely get them..as far as softness, I feel they are a touch softer than Rembrandts. Although may not be as pigment rich. Artarama has them as open stock in their physical stores if you are close to one.