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princess
01-10-2000, 11:06 PM
Which is the best book for a beginner to learn Basic Drawing

princess
01-11-2000, 06:08 AM
Thank You Sandi, I do have that book.
Originally posted by Sandi:
I must say, I am very partial to the Betty Edwards book, "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain". It's fun, enlightening, and reasonably priced. Enjoy!

rapolina
04-27-2000, 04:47 AM
I found a very interestin book on drawing that differs from classic manuals how-to: "the zen of seeing" by F. Frank, which offers a peculiar approach to the drawing: if you don't draw a thing, you didn't see it, you just looked at it.
I think that this book alone cannot be enough, but is very helpful in undestanding a new way and feeling of drawing, and well coniujates with betty edwards's one.

A manual that I found very helpful at the begininng, enabling in drawing stright away, is "how to draw anything" by M Linley, which is moreover very cheap (1,5 on amazon.co.uk.
Hoping to be helpful, as i met the same problems of yours,
rapolina

rapolina
04-27-2000, 04:49 AM
I found a very interestin book on drawing that differs from classic manuals how-to: "the zen of seeing" by F. Frank, which offers a peculiar approach to the drawing: if you don't draw a thing, you didn't see it, you just looked at it.
I think that this book alone cannot be enough, but is very helpful in undestanding a new way and feeling of drawing, and well coniujates with betty edwards's one.

A manual that I found very helpful at the begininng, enabling in drawing stright away, is "how to draw anything" by M Linley, which is moreover very cheap (1,5 on amazon.co.uk.
Hoping to be helpful, as i met the same problems of yours,
rapolina

mark71565
04-27-2000, 05:02 AM
That would depend on WHAT you wanted to draw...

Mark http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

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Humans are visual creatures... I just give them something to look at.
~Mark Ventimiglia

rapolina
04-27-2000, 07:58 AM
what are your suggestions on the topic Mark?
Obviously it depends on what one wishes to draw, but if searching a starting point...
do you know any alternative and innovative books?
bye, rapolina.

cagathoc
04-27-2000, 06:38 PM
I learned from the Betty Edwards book and from "The Natural Way to Draw" by Kimon Nicolaides.

The best teacher is your sketch book... and the life model...


cindy

Uubald
04-27-2000, 11:20 PM
Yes, Betty sure know her way around the brain!
I too have the book!
ABout Kimon Nicholaides, well, you'd have to choose what chapters to practice, once in a while, cause believe me, one has to be a master of self control and discipline to follow all exercices in order, and in a reasonabble time span. Even the drawing teacher I respect the most tells us to try specific examples in the book.

About other books...
To draw cartoons, I'd reccommend any book by Christopher Hart. Believe it or not, cartoons helped my observation skills for drawing the model!

Looking at the old masters will absolutely help you understand drawing's possibilities.
Go to museums, STARE at the original drawings, look at the pensil strokes, try t understand how they did it.

I also have a lot of good to say about HIGH FOCUS DRAWING by James Mcmullen. Very different from betty's approach, but I found I understood more how a drawing can look "correct" but yet not alive.
Of course, it's absolutely true that drawing from observation, and various subjects, will be your best teacher. When you really draw something, you learn it in a more powerful way
than just looking at it.
Photographs will also help you work with tone and values, contrasts, and textures.
So many sources for learning! I'm right into it, in painting and drawing in university! I love it!

AS another exercice in creativity and fun, try to see things in stains and patterns, and draw them so everybosy sees it as you do!

Hope this helps!
Uubald

princess
04-28-2000, 06:41 AM
Thanks to all replys, I do have the Betty Edwards book.
I first got interested in drawing at our senior center, where drawing classes was offered for a short time.
Mostly it just involved sketching someone elses work that the instructor brought in.
Since I first posted my question in Jan. I enrolled in a High School Art Drawing class.
Although it is by corrsepondence, I dearly love it! Rather than book work, this course sends you outside your home for all the lessons so far. Studying Nature and reality.
Learning to draw textures to include in your art work, so much more I could say but just wanted to let you know I'm having the time of my life with this and now have a deeper love and respect for drawing than I could have ever imagined. So with that and Wet Canvas, I cannot fail. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
Again thanks to everyone for your suggestions.

Burkeman
05-15-2000, 03:42 PM
I have the Betty Edwards book as well but have recently bought a book by Jack Hamm on drawing Landscapes and Seascapes that is really interesting. He also has books on other subjects like figure drawing and still life drawing. The landscape drawing book is really good in that it covers all different types of landscape objects and spends a great deal of time talking about composition and methods as well. Not a real pricey book either. I have run across the figure drawing one as well and would eventually like to buy a copy of it as well.

kaz
05-15-2000, 09:53 PM
I found the Walter Foster series on drawing very informative and covered a lot of textures and great wildlife studies.
Also if you can ever find a book by the artist Andrew Loomis, snatch it up as quick as you can.
Good Luck and the more you draw the better ya get!

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