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menko
11-10-2014, 05:13 AM
Hey guys, I'm a beginner acrylic painter, and have a shed that I'm really keen on getting down on canvas and looking good. This is one of the photos of said shed. The difficulty I'm having is getting that ridge pattern. Any suggestions? Hope this is the right area of the forum for this post!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Nov-2014/1964262-vlcsnap-2014-10-21-08h22m56s173.jpg

chammi kaiser
11-10-2014, 05:18 AM
The easiest way would be to first paint the entire shed with the basic colour - the medium tone or medium grey, then add the darker and lighter strips. Lastly finish with the touches of very light bits eg. on the ends of the wooden strips, the window frame etc. Don't use pure white. Mix white with a tiny touch of your grey colour but make it the lightest tone of your painting. Hope this helps a little. Be happy to answer any questions.

menko
11-10-2014, 05:22 AM
Hmm that's the approach I was hoping I wouldn't have to do, detailing each strip individually. But if that's what has to happen then there you go!

The thing which was giving me the most uphill was the thin strips of shadow. My plan was to paint a flat shed wall with dark and light parts, but not in strips. Then to just draw in the ridge shadows to make the strips.

Tripod
11-10-2014, 08:49 AM
Why not try a dry brush technique over the whole area using a mix of the base colour and add odd colours here and there, in the same angles as the shed sides, don't try and depict every plank(strip).
You can use the very light colour in the mix too, keep it dry and broken.

chammi kaiser
11-10-2014, 09:45 AM
If you want it quite impressionistic, then adding odd suggestions of shapes and colours isn't a bad idea. Dry brushing is therefore a good option. I suggest you take a piece of spare paper, put a block of basic colour on it and see how it looks with either method, rather than rushing into the main painting and being disappointed. Good luck.

frodron
11-10-2014, 10:29 AM
I would suggest two possible ways :-
1. Either use a technical waterproof pen.
2. Use what used to be called a Draughtsman's pen as seen in the accompanying picture.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Nov-2014/45415-Drawing_pen_set.JPG



I would suggest the latter for drawing the lines between the planks as you can load it with acrylic paint as well as varying the line thickness.
Furthermore it comes apart for easy cleaning.

asmith38
11-10-2014, 11:38 AM
What about double loaded brush? After the base coat, load one side of a flat brush with the dark color, and the other side with the lighter color. The center of the planks remains untouched.

menko
11-11-2014, 02:27 AM
Thanks guys, I wasn't going to go for an impressionist style, but I could try that out. I hadn't heard of the dry brush technique before. Will also give that pen a try.

Wassie
11-11-2014, 07:09 PM
Why not try a dry brush technique over the whole area using a mix of the base colour and add odd colours here and there, in the same angles as the shed sides, don't try and depict every plank(strip).
You can use the very light colour in the mix too, keep it dry and broken.

That's what I would do.

Wassie
11-11-2014, 07:11 PM
Thanks guys, I wasn't going to go for an impressionist style, but I could try that out. I hadn't heard of the dry brush technique before. Will also give that pen a try.

If you weren't going for the impressionist style, then I think you would have to draw individual planks. Start painting and let us see as you go along.

Glean
11-11-2014, 07:22 PM
I did a barn that I liked a while back where I painted the entire thing the "shadow" color, dragging on the middle tones second, then the highlights last...kind of scumbling with fairly dry paint and a bristle brush. The variation came out almost without me even trying. It wasn't extremely realistic, so might not work for you but might be worth trying a small section on another paper and seeing if you like the effect.

tomtex
11-11-2014, 07:39 PM
Painting something you are intimately familiar with can be a very frustrating experience. First: don't sweat the small stuff. You will definitely lose your cool if you try to get every detail exact. It's not a photo, so don't try to make it look like one. Second: don't insult your viewer. Make a suggestion and move one. When someone looks at your work, their imagination will make it look a lot better than you can make it look with your brush. Third: plan on painting the thing two, three or more times until you get something you can live with. It will never be perfect. I challenge everyone on this site to propose they have never had a picture that they didn't later look back on and see something they would like to change. But then, that's just what I've heard. Keep going.

tomtex
11-11-2014, 07:42 PM
Painting something you are intimately familiar with can be a very frustrating experience. First: don't sweat the small stuff. You will definitely lose your cool if you try to get every detail exact. It's not a photo, so don't try to make it look like one. Second: don't insult your viewer. Make a suggestion and move one. When someone looks at your work, their imagination will make it look a lot better than you can make it look with your brush. Third: plan on painting the thing two, three or more times until you get something you can live with. It will never be perfect in your sight. I challenge everyone on this site to propose they have never had a picture that they didn't later look back on and see something they would like to change. But then, that's just what I've heard. Keep going.

Dcam
11-11-2014, 08:17 PM
Hi: For all my clapboard, I use a good old graphite pencil.....it leaves a nice neutral gray shadow, then I seal it with matt medium and brush and let dry....then paint away. Derek
Good luck
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Nov-2014/183894-cape_cod_gray_001.JPG

menko
11-23-2014, 06:29 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Nov-2014/1964262-IMG_20141124_110547.jpg

Ok I did a few test techniques, and I think this one is pretty decent. I know the lines the verticals are off haha, just a test though trying to get the wood looking right.

I ended up putting a base medium tone colour, then using dry brush technique with lighter tones for each plank of wood. Then came in with a flat brush and carefully put in the shadow lines.. just concentration and correct paint consistency.. no special technique really. Lastly, a few highlights using dry brush.

Pretty please give me some critique to make it better! :)

Dcam
11-23-2014, 07:27 PM
:)