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Prizen
10-26-2014, 04:48 PM
Hi all,

This is my first post here, appears to be a fantastic resource, glad to have come across this. Hopefully I can learn here and be able to contribute as I progress, but for now I am Just starting out, so would really love to get some advice. That said, I had painted a lot while in high school, but that was over 15 years ago and I really have forgotten even if I used watercolours oils or acrylics!

So I guess the first question would be, which method should I use? I intend to landscape paintings by whatever medium would bring the most satisfaction and results - what would you recommend? Acrylic, or oils, or watercolours?

The next question is equipment. Based upon the above route, what paper or canvass should I get, what type of brushes, what type / brand / colours of paint? Anything else I need?

Lastly, what is the best method to learn? I don't think I will be in a position to attend classes so I guess I will be resigned to YouTube or DVDs.
Would you start out by watching a tutorial of a painting and then try to replicate that painting?

Any help appreciated! Thank you so much.

asmith38
10-26-2014, 05:15 PM
Hello Prizen,

Welcome to Wet Canvas :)!

We're glad to have you here with us, and everyone here is friendly and loves to help. However, your choice of medium is really such a personal choice, that you're the only one who can make that decision.

What did you use in HS (dang, I wish I could say only 15 years ago :D)? You may want to start again with a similar medium. Your post is in the acrylics forum, so we might be a little biased towards it ;), but there is also a forum for watercolors, oils, and landscapes. The equipment will depend on the medium, although some basics are the same such as an easel.

Youtube has a ton of videos or various qualities. Browse around Wet Canvas and learn to use the search function, as there are lots of great resources here. Each forum has PALs (paint along), monthly challenges, and those are wonderful to participate in.

You may want to start with basic stuff to refresh your memory, things like color wheel, perspective, composition, etc. No special equipment needed for those.

Prizen
10-26-2014, 05:43 PM
Hello Prizen,

Welcome to Wet Canvas :)!

We're glad to have you here with us, and everyone here is friendly and loves to help. However, your choice of medium is really such a personal choice, that you're the only one who can make that decision.

What did you use in HS (dang, I wish I could say only 15 years ago :D)? You may want to start again with a similar medium. Your post is in the acrylics forum, so we might be a little biased towards it ;), but there is also a forum for watercolors, oils, and landscapes. The equipment will depend on the medium, although some basics are the same such as an easel.

Youtube has a ton of videos or various qualities. Browse around Wet Canvas and learn to use the search function, as there are lots of great resources here. Each forum has PALs (paint along), monthly challenges, and those are wonderful to participate in.

You may want to start with basic stuff to refresh your memory, things like color wheel, perspective, composition, etc. No special equipment needed for those.

Thanks so much Ann!

bunford
10-26-2014, 06:34 PM
The differences on a basic level are:

Watercolour
Tends to be the cheapest way into painting in terms of materials. However, can be very difficult and frustrating to get good results due to transparency of colours and usually needing patience to layer etc

Acrylics
Tend to be the next cheapest way into painting. Student grade paints such as W&N's Galeria range and Liquitex Basics are decent for the price you pay. Dries quickly so can paint anywhere with acrylics and can also add layers quickly, but can be difficult to blend and takes patience if realism is your thing.

Oils
Probably the most expensive method of painting and also take the longest to dry. Alkyd-based mediums help speed things up but you are still looking at a few days to truly dry to paint over and 6-12 months until dry enough to varnish and 'complete'. However, in terms of painting oils are the most forgiving due to ;open' time (which is the time the paint is workable for) so can produce the best results, particularly for realism.

I am also fairly new to the game again after a long spell away of about 15 years, but this is my tuppence worth. I won't even go into mediums etc as that will just confuse you until you decide what type of paints you will go for.

However, as my opinion from someone in a similar-ish position, i practice basic technique that are usable in all mediums (such as colour theory, brush strokes etc) with acrylics but i find they can be frustrating if diung 'proper' painting due to drying too quickly but i tend to get my best results when painting with oils. I use both as there are no rules saying you have to stick to one type!

ColinS
10-26-2014, 06:45 PM
Welcome Prizen

As Ann has said, the choice of medium is very personal.

I did a little bit of watercolour painting about 20 years ago, but tried acrylics almost 5 years ago. What I like about acrylics is the depth of colour, and the ability to make corrections if I mess up, which I do all the time. :lol: Also, since I am not a patient person, the short drying time of acrylics suits me well. I can't imagine being able to wait for oil paint to dry.

Some people start with acrylics and then move to oils or water soluble oils; others go the reverse.

As for learning, I think the best learning is by trying and practicing. There are lots of links here on the Information Kiosk to many resources:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=329

Check out the frequently asked questions "Umbrella" thread too:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1363257

Lots of good information from others collected there.

We have a monthly challenges in this Forum called "Different Strokes" and you are welcome to jump in and participate. In addition the Landscape Forum also puts up a monthly challenge as well. Of course there are also books, youTube videos, and Classrooms on WetCanvas. An abundance of resources.

If you are starting, you might want to use less expensive Canvasboard or cardboard for your first experiments. A lot of people use mat board (used to mat pictures in frames) which takes the paint and may be available inexpensively as off cuts from framing shops. I use a lot of Canvasboard myself which is lower cost and more easily stored than stretched canvas on frames.

Lots of good advice on paint and brushes in the Umbrella thread - personally I use mainly Golden paints - expensive but I like the results.

Happy painting.

Charlie's Mum
10-26-2014, 07:09 PM
Welcome to WC! .. and to Acrylics if you choose this medium!

This forum itself is a huge resource - so go to our sub forum The Information Kiosk (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=329) (Colin also gave you the link) - and just look at the contents there.

A good place to start is the Tips thread - at, or near, the top of the page in the IK

Then look at 'The Classroom Index' (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=432555) - these threads will show you how to do a number of techniques, methods, explains topics etc - lots to read.

You'll also find PALs in the IK - (Paint-A-Longs) where we paint and explore subjects and how to fo things together.

You'll also find an Index of all the Different Strokes over the years - these are not so much learning threads but as challenges, they often promote 'self-learning'.

Whichever medium you decide to buy into, just try to get to know what it does, what it's capable of, how the colours work together and mix.
In any case, start with a basic set of colours (check out some of the palette/paint threads in the 'Umbrella' thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1363257) of links) ......... this is not yet complete but still has lots in it!
A basic set might be =

Lemon yellow and cadmium yellow (that a cool and a warm of each)
Cerulean blue and Fr. Ultramarine
Cadmium red and alizarin crimson.

They're your three primary colours in both cool and warm ranges. It's a personal choice so others will have a different set to suggest!

Mix any two primaries together for your secondary colours -
R+B=P
Y+B=G
R+Y=O
Add a tube of white and theoretically you can mix any colour!

A few brushes, and card, paper or canvas board - or hardboard or mdf (these will need to be gessoed first) then just play!:)

Enjoy, practice, enjoy, practice ... you get the idea? :)

DMSS
10-27-2014, 08:19 AM
For videos, I have found willkempartschool.com very helpful. He has a lot of free videos and written material on his website, and I have done 2 or 3 of his video courses, for which one pays. He is a good teacher. For paint, I recommend artist's quality, such as Golden, Liquitex and M. Graham. There are quite a few other brands. There are several threads on Wetcanvas on oil v acrylic, including one last week in the oil painting forum. For me, the important differences are that acrylics dry fast, are harder to blend wet into wet (but some acrylic painters, including some people here, are awesome at this), easy to blend wet on dry, can be used like watercolors if one wishes, surface preparation is less fussy than with oils, and there are no fat over lean issues. Oils blend beautifully, have luscious colors, and one can work very slowly with them.

Why not try both?

Good luck and have fun!

DMSS
10-27-2014, 08:25 AM
To answer one of your other questions,I would start by doing a painting or two, then look at some videos and books.

TeaTrekkie
10-27-2014, 11:20 AM
I have enjoyed reading this thread. Having wandered over to the oil and watercolor forum to find the 'perfect' type of painting for me, I have realized that each have different attributes.

I like the non-toxic part of watercolors, but the 'good' paper costs a ton and those washes are boring to practice. You also have to store your paintings carefully; most seem to be displayed under glass! Of course, acrylics and oils are on canvasses. That just seems more 'painterly' to me. :) I like the rich colors of both, but blending is a pain with acrylics. And lastly, I'm not so fond of an oil painting taking so long to dry, although, there are ways to get around this I hear.

Someone mentioned that you can use acrylics like watercolors. I am intrigued by that and may give it a try.

Well, better get painting!

Charlie's Mum
10-27-2014, 01:42 PM
Someone mentioned that you can use acrylics like watercolors.
Even better is to use acrylic inks - more heavily saturated than thinned heavy-body acrylics and glorious colours.