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TeaTrekkie
10-15-2014, 06:49 PM
This is the second acrylic painting that I have ever done. Obviously, I have a long way to go. I am trying to figure out how to rectify the area of the tree trunks. Originally, I painted the white strips to signify the light from the sky behind the trees (the dark area inside the strips were supposed to be the trunks). But now it looks like there is this weird dark area (a black hole, maybe?) next to each tree. Since trying to paint in the sky down there might result in a big mess, should I change up the white strips to look more like these ARE the trunks, maybe birch tree trunks? Any other thoughts or suggestions on how to make this better?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Oct-2014/979990-IMG_2811_smaller.jpg

brusher
10-15-2014, 07:16 PM
You're very close. A simple thing to do would be to lighten the tone in the middle of the trunks; but how about looking online at tree trunks and how the light comes down upon them (sometimes it looks diagonal, or mottled). That will help you. And make sure that the tree trunks are not exactly uniform in thickness or texture.

All else looks great, I think.

Cathy

TeaTrekkie
10-15-2014, 07:19 PM
Thanks for the reply! So, change the white strips to be tree trunks then? That would be the easiest route I think. And just let the dark area next to the lower part of the trees remain dark?

idylbrush
10-15-2014, 08:24 PM
I think the light works well. It defines the tree trunks. If you lighten anything, and you don't have to, lighten the center are of the tree trunk, in other words, the dark areas. I like the idea of looking at tree trunk photos. If you decide to lighten the trunks, very little would be a good option I think.

TeaTrekkie
10-15-2014, 11:44 PM
So, use the light strips to define the trunks and to decide if I want to lighten the other dark areas. Sounds like a plan. I have looked at some pictures and will see what I can do to make this look a tad lighter. Thanks!

chammi kaiser
10-16-2014, 07:10 AM
Definitely don't do anything with the area between the tree trunks. I like the way you have used negative space here - just slightly lighten the tree trunks themselves with a lighter mix of the trunk colour. Decide from which angle your light is coming and softly lighten that side of the trunks. Good work on that sky.
You have a very dark area behind the trees It looks like a building. If it isn't then you need to cover it with sky colour to give the work a more airy feel.
Hope this helps and you understand what I am getting at.

TeaTrekkie
10-16-2014, 10:48 AM
Definitely don't do anything with the area between the tree trunks. I like the way you have used negative space here - just slightly lighten the tree trunks themselves with a lighter mix of the trunk colour. Decide from which angle your light is coming and softly lighten that side of the trunks. Good work on that sky.
You have a very dark area behind the trees It looks like a building. If it isn't then you need to cover it with sky colour to give the work a more airy feel.
Hope this helps and you understand what I am getting at.
Yes! That's the part I was trying to fix. The 'building' part. :D So, I need to bring the sky down there? That scares me since there's so much paint there already (the layers that went down first) and it's so dark. I don't want it to look overworked. Do I just start laying the paint on like I did the sky, staying with the same shades? And won't this effectively take away the little white stripes? (just trying to make totally sure I understand what you are saying)

chammi kaiser
10-16-2014, 12:23 PM
It would be a lot easier if you first painted the dark areas white or with gesso and then painted your sky colours over that. Painting just the sky colours will be too dark. This will only remove the white stripes that are meant to be sky holes. Your trees as far as I can see are the dark areas between the white stripes. These dark tree trunks need a slight lighter shade of dark down one side (the side that the light is catching) to make them look like tree trunks and give a rounded effect. Anything you are not sure of, I would be happy to explain.

LavenderFrost
10-16-2014, 12:38 PM
When I paint a scene I usually try to work from back to front. To achieve the look you wanted I would have painted the sky all the down and then painted the trees on top.

You could go with Chammi's suggestion or take the easy way and lighten the trunks have this as the beginning of a dense forest.

TeaTrekkie
10-16-2014, 01:00 PM
When I paint a scene I usually try to work from back to front. To achieve the look you wanted I would have painted the sky all the down and then painted the trees on top.

You could go with Chammi's suggestion or take the easy way and lighten the trunks have this as the beginning of a dense forest.

When I first started this, it was meant to be an abstract type landscape, but as it progressed, a more realistic one emerged. So, I planned it one way and painted it another way. :)

Yes, Chammi's idea would work and I do like it, but I also thought of the dense forest thing as an easier route. How about I take out all the lower white stuff (dots and stripes), then repaint some real looking trunks (less of them too), and keep the dark in the back as a receding forest? That solves the weird lines showing through next to the trunks and doesn't pull the sky down into the dark areas. Do you think this could work?

TeaTrekkie
10-16-2014, 01:42 PM
It would be a lot easier if you first painted the dark areas white or with gesso and then painted your sky colours over that. Painting just the sky colours will be too dark. This will only remove the white stripes that are meant to be sky holes. Your trees as far as I can see are the dark areas between the white stripes. These dark tree trunks need a slight lighter shade of dark down one side (the side that the light is catching) to make them look like tree trunks and give a rounded effect. Anything you are not sure of, I would be happy to explain. Thanks again, for your help. Did you see my other post? Thinking of changing it up a bit different. Do you think that would work out okay? Frankly, I just want to be done with this and move onto something new. :)

chammi kaiser
10-16-2014, 02:55 PM
I have just read your previous post and I think it would be a shame to redo this as there are some really nice elements in your painting. Perhaps put it aside for a while , keep this in your favourites and start something else. One can get so frustrated with a painting and it becomes tedious and loses the fun element which I feel is very important. The process of painting must be enjoyable. As an experienced artist and teacher, I can fully understand that you just want to be finished with this work and that is perfectly okay. Put it away for a while and come back to it later and have some fun with a new painting. Feel free to send me a private mail if you have any questions. Hang in there. You have talent.

Charlie's Mum
10-16-2014, 03:20 PM
If it's a dense forest your after you wouldn't see light between the trunks!:)
You might see some sky holes, so that's OK.

You do have good advice above and you'll have to choose which path to follow - I'd suggest emphasising -
paint from back to front
paint in layers of colour back to front - e g further away = greyer, less intense tone and colour
middle layer of trees, slightly more colour and tone
front layer of trees have the most 'detail' colour and tone.
Also, vary the distance/space between the verticals to create interest and allow the eye to enter the forest.
You have a large foreground, empty space - consider making some trees there - even in part as they come towards the viewer - this will help lead the eye in from the front edge of the canvas to the forest.

TeaTrekkie
10-16-2014, 03:53 PM
Lots of good advice here! Let me be sure I know what you are saying, though. If I were to get into this later (yes, Chammi, I'm going to lay this aside and do a different one for now...thanks!), then I could add trees in the foreground that are brighter in color than the ones in the background. Also, have one tree maybe halfway on the edge of the canvas so that the eye looks toward the forest for more. And I should make my other background trees less uniform and not exactly side by side. Is that all right?

That might make for a whole new painting. And that's okay! It could be fun to try another one with the same general theme, but with these techniques added. Thanks!

cinderblockstudios
10-16-2014, 04:46 PM
Paint the entire sky first, then the trees. That way the space between the trees will be more natural.

Charlie's Mum
10-16-2014, 06:08 PM
Lots of good advice here! Let me be sure I know what you are saying, though. If I were to get into this later (yes, Chammi, I'm going to lay this aside and do a different one for now...thanks!), then I could add trees in the foreground that are brighter in color than the ones in the background. Also, have one tree maybe halfway on the edge of the canvas so that the eye looks toward the forest for more. And I should make my other background trees less uniform and not exactly side by side. Is that all right?

That might make for a whole new painting. And that's okay! It could be fun to try another one with the same general theme, but with these techniques added. Thanks!
Basically, yes!

Meanwhile, go to the Information Kiosk, link in my sig., look for Classroom Index then title of Perspective class, that should help too ...... any more help, shout!:)

East Sun
10-16-2014, 08:17 PM
If I didn't know you were a beginner I would have thought you had a unique style. I personally like it as it is.

But you want to grow and not do the same kind of thing always I would imagine, so play with it and see how it comes out.

I would keep the original.

Here I am giving advice when I probably need advice more than anyone.

Jim

asmith38
10-16-2014, 09:12 PM
Jim,
We all need advice. Art can be humbling sometimes :).

TeaTrekkie
10-16-2014, 10:58 PM
If I didn't know you were a beginner I would have thought you had a unique style. I personally like it as it is.

But you want to grow and not do the same kind of thing always I would imagine, so play with it and see how it comes out.

I would keep the original.

Here I am giving advice when I probably need advice more than anyone.

Jim
Aww, thanks, Jim. I really do appreciate the kind words. For now, I'm going to set it aside. I might just leave it or change it up later. I suspect I'll have other paintings going in the meantime. I am about a thousand behind where I should be. Late start, you know. ;)

ColinS
10-17-2014, 11:17 PM
Aww, thanks, Jim. I really do appreciate the kind words. For now, I'm going to set it aside. I might just leave it or change it up later. I suspect I'll have other paintings going in the meantime. I am about a thousand behind where I should be. Late start, you know. ;)

Well it's very nice. Some good advice from the others. But the best advice is to take what you've learned from this one and go on to,something new.