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OfTheCadmiumLance
10-10-2014, 01:09 PM
My paints are sliding all over the place...and I cannot find anything online about it. I put down a ground, usually a craft acrylic cause why use a more expensive paint for a ground? Then certain paints or mixes will slide around, and others will apply evenly and flatly. I will post an example.

jennifervs
10-10-2014, 01:47 PM
The craft paint you used for a ground could be too slick for the expensive acrylics to adhere to. Also, it looks like you are using a color like Permanent Green Light, which is usually transparent to semi-transparent, and that's the "normal"way the color looks when applied. If you are used to craft acrylics, they tend to be more opaque than professional paints.

Have you tried applied the green color to a plain piece of watercolor paper, gessoed canvas or different surface? You may be able to determine if the transparent green is standard, or just acting this way on the craft acrylic.

And of course, each brand has its own "feeling" too.

asmith38
10-10-2014, 06:13 PM
I have used craft paints and even mixed them with my "good" ones and have not had this problem. It looks to me like you are putting too thick of a layer. Try loading less paint on your brush and see if that works better.
What kind of paint is the green one?

brusher
10-10-2014, 06:18 PM
What you are describing sounds fairly typical of acrylics; some colors will just slide around like jelly. I think it is just a matter of getting used to the behavior of different pigments, and always try to use thin layers at first. The advice given above is very good!
Cathy

Charlie's Mum
10-10-2014, 06:19 PM
Some cheap paints do this because they have a lot of filler and little pigment - so not only are they transparent but also are very unsatisfactory in application - very frustrating!
Sometimes if you use a medium - like a gloss medium - as a base this will happen also.
Most acrylics, even good ones, will need more than one layer - most acrylic paintings are built in layers.
Is this on a canvas-weave paper pad? That could sometimes be part of the problem too.
As Jennifer suggests above, try the same paint on different surfaces and see how it behaves and looks.

cinderblockstudios
10-10-2014, 07:29 PM
Craft paint often has a very low viscosity and low pigment load. This is why it IS good to use nice quality paints regardless of how simple the use is.

George Servais
10-10-2014, 10:22 PM
raft paint is never a good idea. Why use good paint on top of a cheap ground. It is like using mud for the foundation of a house. If you want to do a toning of your support consider using a medium to thin your color. Thin acrylic too much with water and it will lose its binder. You can tint gesso with some paint and use that. It will give your paint something better to grab. And please use a good gesso and not some cheap milk water. It is your art and it deserves the best you can give it. It is an expression or you. What would you like it to say?

LavenderFrost
10-11-2014, 01:14 PM
My thought is that it has to do with the transparency of the colour. You can put a more opaque colour on thin and it will cover more evenly than a transparent one. Then you need more layers to even it out.

Andrew
10-11-2014, 02:31 PM
If you are used to craft acrylics, they tend to be more opaque than professional paints.

Huh?

Craft paints are more water, mostly vehicle and very little pigment. That does not equate to being more opaque. Certainly, lines that are "matte" or listed as being suitable for more absorbent surfaces may appear to be opaque, as they are loaded up with particulate filler to aid in coverage, but that does not mean they are truly opaque.

Craft paints can be problematic. Do to the higher vehicle content, they can have a much slicker feel to the finished film. They also do not tend to disperse as evenly, when left to their own devices. If you wish to continue with using craft paints, I would suggest that you begin with a much more porous and absorbent (unprimed) surface in order to maintain some tooth for the better paint to grab onto, or alternatively, run a fine grit sandpaper over your toned surface and wipe the dust off with a damp rag.

Andrew

jennifervs
10-17-2014, 12:45 PM
Huh?

Craft paints are more water, mostly vehicle and very little pigment. That does not equate to being more opaque. Certainly, lines that are "matte" or listed as being suitable for more absorbent surfaces may appear to be opaque, as they are loaded up with particulate filler to aid in coverage, but that does not mean they are truly opaque.


Perhaps I misspoke. Matte or flat would have been a better word.

But the cheap craft paints I am thinking of - like Delta, Americana or Apple Barrel - typically have lots of fillers for coverage. These tend to be more "opaque" than a fine art paint for 1-2 coat flat coverage, but that flat opacity is not a usually a good thing, especially when the massive wet to dry color shift occurs. Opaque vs highly pigmented are two different things.

And a color like that Bright Green in a craft paint formula will probably have a lot of white in it, adding to its opacity. If you are used to craft paints, like OfTheCadmiumLance, then an "better" acrylic in a color like that Bright Green will be noticeably different.