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backwater
10-06-2014, 06:25 PM
Iím looking for the perfect Yellow Oil paint. It should be more luminous than any color on my palette - yet not garish, gaudy, harsh or obtrusive - soft as the tentative first rays of sunshine. It should be elegant; glowing but not glaring.

Any suggestions? Thank you.

jacqseddon
10-07-2014, 05:24 AM
Thank you for your question. The cadmium yellows have the greatest carrying power, and are the best option for what you are looking for.

Saskia
12-27-2014, 11:04 PM
Interesting question. I thought I would add to it. Cads are beautiful, but what about a non-toxic option? I would like a yellow with precisely those same qualities, but I have a young child, and also will soon have a parrot in the house. Does a safer alternative possessing those characteristics exist?

Mikey
02-06-2015, 12:48 PM
How about a Nickel Titanate. There's a whole range of yellows.

rguetre
03-06-2016, 02:22 AM
hmm... a perfect yellow... depends on how you want it to behave, if you want a transparent yellow for glazes, try Old Holland Indian Yellow or Winsor Newton transparent yellow (Azo)
Opaque applications: Cadmium Yellow light or Nickel Titanate.
Seems to me there are no perfect single colours because all we have are pigments, close approximations with a green or orange bias. Arylide yellow (DaVinci) maybe?

BobPi
05-03-2016, 11:49 AM
Not to mention that the appearance of any yellow is affected by the colors that surround it, so it is hard to satisfy your criteria in absolute terms.

WFMartin
05-09-2016, 03:58 PM
Since Yellow is a primary color, its degree of "perfection" is based upon its location on the color wheel, as determined by an analysis with a color measuring instrument, and plotting its location according to the results of such an analysis.

Any Yellow that plots on the correct "spoke" (hue) of the color wheel, and as close as possible to the outermost ring would be considered a "perfect" Yellow, or as close as one could get. This is in terms of how close it comes to meeting the specifications of being a "perfect primary color". Now, while being a "perfect primary color" may not make it an "appropriate Yellow", or a "convenient Yellow" in terms of practical use by a painter, that characteristic most definitely does make it a "perfect Yellow".

Aside from that specification, the rest of such "perfection" would lie in the handling of such a Yellow, and with such characteristics as its tinting strength, opacity, transparency, cost, availability, etc., etc.

The paint that I've chosen as my "perfect Yellow" is Winsor & Newton's Transparent Yellow 653. It is a transparent Yellow, whose Pigment ID is PY128, and they call it an "AZO Condensation" (whatever that means), and it plots very close to being a "perfect Yellow" on the color wheel.

I've found that transparent colors (all of them) are much more versatile than any opaque paint. They mix with other transparent colors, to create very deep "darks". Yet, you can mix White with with them causing them to burst into high-chroma color.

sidbledsoe
05-15-2016, 09:18 AM
Cadmium Yellow Lemon.

tao fumao
06-16-2016, 08:29 AM
You can always glaze with transparent yellow such as winsor&newton's.

WFMartin
06-21-2016, 10:08 PM
You can always glaze with transparent yellow such as winsor&newton's.

That's the stuff!!

sidbledsoe
06-23-2016, 08:23 AM
Iím looking for the perfect Yellow Oil paint. It should be more luminous than any color on my palette - yet not garish, gaudy, harsh or obtrusive - soft as the tentative first rays of sunshine. It should be elegant; glowing but not glaring.

Any suggestions? Thank you.
After rereading your requirements, a most luminous and elegant yellow, not garish, nor harsh, nor obtrusive, and as soft as the first rays of sunshine, a paint color that glows, but is not glaring, a perfect yellow oil paint such as this does not exist!

backwater, I doubt that you will see this since I see that you have made only one single post on WC, and that was over a year ago.

thevaliantx
09-17-2016, 12:40 AM
The Yellow Submarine ...:lol:

Sparro
07-20-2018, 03:53 PM
If you think about it a garish yellow can be used sparingly and mixed with white or other colors to get what you want. What I look at when I'm picking a yellow is if it tends toward orange or toward green. The website: artiscreation.com color of art pigment database tells you some characteristics about the pigments if you don't want to just eyeball it. The Naples yellow is more gentle like you describe, but it's only made by Michael Harding and is super expensive. Bismuth yellow is also an option because it's supposed to be fairly lightfast. Of course the Cadmium yellow Light is one of the best and most popular. I plan on trying some benzimidazolone yellow because it's supposed to be more transparent. If you build up transparent layers, as with a glaze, maybe you can accomplish the beautiful luminous yellow that you seek.