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George Servais
09-12-2014, 01:53 PM
I asked Liquitex paint Tech dept. about thinning their HB acrylic paint. The reason I asked is because I follow a particular artist for learning and became a bit skeptical about some of his techniques when I rubbed a damp paper towel across a painting I was working on (that had beed sitting for 4 days) and saw pigment on the paper towel. It seem it is a common practice to add a ton of water to acrylic to obtain washes or to tone a canvas or to paint really thin lines. It is a bad practice and it doesn't matter what you do afterward with varnish or sealer. Your painting will cease to be archival at that point. Here is the response I received from one Amy Faris a technical advisor from Liquitex.

Dear George,

Thanks for writing to us. You can add water to our paint, but no more than 25 percent as more than that will start leading you towards an under bound, weakened, paint film. My best recommendation for thinning would indeed be our Airbrush Medium. However, you should know that the greater the amount of medium added to the paint, the greater the increase in the color's transparency. If this is something you want to avoid, I'm going to recommend that instead of working with our Heavy Body paint, you try instead our Soft Body line or our Acrylic Inks. Both carry a professional grade pigment load, but have a much lower viscosity right out of the bottle/tube, so you won't have to add a ton of medium in order to thin them. This will allow you to retain the color's strength and intensity.

I hope that this has helped.

ThickPainting
09-12-2014, 02:25 PM
I'm extremely confused as to why you want to thin thick paint. It's purpose is to be thick and of course takes longer to dry. To cut drying in half or more, you can put blow air from a big (clean) fan on it. To get a wash or thin lines, you use soft body or fluid acrylics that have the thinness and rich pigment without losing binder. You of course can use both thick paints for texture and thin paints for washes in the same painting. So I am confused at what you are wanting or talking about. You just use the right paint to do the right job.

cem
09-12-2014, 03:28 PM
I am guilty of thinning my HBac with water for the effect I want. Many layers of thinned paint/washes/glazes. I haven't been painting long enough to know if there will be a problem with them later on. From what I have read it's okay to use thinned with water acrylics on watercolor paper but not canvas. Fortunately most of my paintings are on paper. I suppose at some point I should invest in soft bodied paints. For now I will stick with what I have and possibly use a medium more than water.

asmith38
09-12-2014, 04:48 PM
George,
Thank you for informing us. There is an artist on youtube who does a lot of thinning with heavy paints, not sure of the brand. He says it's ok with the heavy body paints, but now we know better ;).

Dcam
09-12-2014, 06:09 PM
Hi George: I'm a little puzzled also. There are so many great fluid acrylics out there with rich color saturation, I can't imagine using Heavy body for thin washes. I do it with "mediums" and then you are always safe. By the way, if you do use too much water, spraying with Lascaux or other good fixatives will seal in the results just fine.

Derek

cinderblockstudios
09-12-2014, 06:59 PM
I'm starting to get the feeling you keep posting this to 1up me. I'm not going to say that you or Liquitex is wrong here. I do want to point out though that it can be very situational. Cheap or Professional paint, in 14 years I've never had a problem with thinned HB rubbing or flaking off.

Dcam
09-12-2014, 07:21 PM
Who is one "upping" you? Ben, you posted this right after my post. Please be specific?

cinderblockstudios
09-13-2014, 01:54 AM
Who is one "upping" you? Ben, you posted this right after my post. Please be specific?

I meant George, since we went back and forth a bit in another thread. If I was responding to you I would have specifically replied. I understand your confusion though.

Andrew
09-14-2014, 09:18 AM
I'm starting to get the feeling you keep posting this to 1up me. I'm not going to say that you or Liquitex is wrong here. I do want to point out though that it can be very situational. Cheap or Professional paint, in 14 years I've never had a problem with thinned HB rubbing or flaking off.

I am right with you on this point. I have painted acrylic on a wide variety of surfaces, from sketchbook paper, to watercolour paper, hardboard, mdf, panel, fabric, canvas (raw, primed, stretched, not stretched), canvas board, and illustration board, and with very few exceptions, I have only thinned with water. And have never (since 1999 anyway) had any issue with paint lifting off the surface. I have thrown far more mediums away, than I have ever used.

Now, from a chemical POV, I can see, where under circumstances where you are painting on non-porous or surfaces with minimal absorbancy, where this might be an issue. And adding additional medium, to optimize adhesion may minimize the effect. But that isn't a guarantee either.

That said, I also must admit, that I maintain a rather dubious stance on any customer support. Their inherent mission is to sell you more stuff. The "here you only need to add this and it will solve all your problems" approach is a classic. In various forms has been a basic tactic since the corner pitchman and the fuller brush salesmen.

Andrew