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artistat38
09-08-2014, 04:12 PM
In many videos that I have viewed on the Artists Network I have found that Artists mount or dry mount their pastel paper or sanded surface onto gatorboard or foam board...Hope im right about these terms....

If someone could shed some light on how the paper is dry mounted as well as what are the advantages of doing so it would be very helpful.....

also is there sufficient space in the regular frames to accommodate the foamboard.......or do these have to be custom framed.....

Thank you,

Prashanti

*Deirdre*
09-08-2014, 06:46 PM
Prashanti...when I dry mount my paster paper/sanded paper, I turn it over onto it's front, and tape the back edges leaving an overhang of about 1/2"....then i lift it and position it on the board, face up. I then tape the overhung tape so that the tape is 1/2 on the board and half on the tape...doesn't touch the paper on the front.
Here's a picture showing it mounted onto an art board...not gator board...same technique though.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Sep-2014/33616-tape.jpg
I don't glue/wet mount....so I'll leave someone else to describe that!:D

artistat38
09-08-2014, 09:52 PM
Thanks Dierdre....another question ...do you mount your pastel paper onto something else before you frame it or you frame just the paper......

Prashanti

Blayne
09-08-2014, 10:48 PM
Hi, Prashanti,
I like the passe partout framing method. I cut foam core the same size as the painting (and the opening in the frame). I lay the foam core down, position the painting on it, face up, then carefully lay the glass on top. I then tape the edges with acid free tape. This "painting sandwich" can then be handled without worrying about pastel dust falling off. Here is a link to an instruction page by Richard McKinley: http://www.artistsnetwork.com/articles/art-demos-techniques/pastel-pointers-blog-passe-partout-framing

Saskia
09-08-2014, 11:29 PM
Traditional dry-mounting uses some kind of adhesive all over the back over the paper which is attached to the board (often the adhesive is heat-activated and comes in the form of dry-mounting paper, hence the "dry" in the term). It is not reversible without heat, and it prevents the paper from buckling either when a wet wash is applied to it, or it spends some time in a frame. I looked into it but decided not to bother with it, since it can be expensive. You can look at Blick here (http://www.dickblick.com/mounting/systems/#drymounting) to see the dry mounting systems they have. But again this is costly and time-consuming, and I know some artists have it professionally done.

I prefer wet-mounting. For that, I use an acrylic matte medium, although a gloss medium would work just as well. You can basically use any type of smooth acrylic medium, because the idea is that it dries as a plastic film that keeps your paper affixed to the board so it is sturdier and will not buckle. Just don't use gesso, or anything with grit in it. I use regular Liquitex Matte Medium. I always use an archival piece of foam.

To do it, just cut your paper and foam board to size, and add some acrylic medium to the center of the board. Then, spread the acrylic medium all over the board to where the edges of the paper will be, making sure it covers the entire area very thinly. If you put on too much, spread it to the edges and wipe it off with a paper towel. It is important that the entire surface be covered with a very thin layer of the acrylic "glue."

Then, put the paper onto the foam board and straighten it the way you want. Once it is in place, put a large piece of wrapping paper, mat board, or something similar that you can rub your hands on over the top of the paper. Since the paper you are gluing is sanded (I assume), you need this additional sheet of paper to act as a barrier so you can rub your hands all over it to press your surface firmly onto the board. Using the wrapping paper, press your sanded paper down onto the board, rubbing from the middle outward to remove any air bubbles. You need to press hard, and cover every area. Once you are sure the paper is firmly affixed to the board, put something on flat on top of it like a large drawing board, and then put some sort of weights on top of that. Actually, what I do is sandwich it between two large drawing boards, turn it upside down, and leave it on a table with some cast iron pots with cans in them on top of it for a couple of hours until it dries.

If you use museum board instead of foam board for this you can follow the same procedure, but as a final step, you should apply a heavy coat of the matte medium all over the back of the board. After that, dry overnight.

This probably sounds like a lot, but it really isn't that much trouble. I always do it when I am using a wet underpainting.

Saskia
09-08-2014, 11:46 PM
I just looked to see if I could find any mention of this online, and I found a couple of links by Richard McKinley. Here, he talks about having his surfaces professionally dry-mounted (I knew he was one of the ones who did that!):

http://www.artistsnetwork.com/articles/art-demos-techniques/mounting-pastel-paper

Here, he talks about using a similar method as I described to mount your surface at home:

http://www.artistsnetwork.com/medium/pastel/techniques-for-stretching-and-mounting-paper-keeping-the-pastel-surface-flat-part-2

artistat38
09-09-2014, 01:47 AM
Thank you Blayne for the info and for sharing the link.....

Thank you Saskia for explaining the process in so much detail so patiently....

really appreciate the help....

Prashanti

*Deirdre*
09-09-2014, 07:00 AM
Thanks Dierdre....another question ...do you mount your pastel paper onto something else before you frame it or you frame just the paper......

Prashanti

Prashanti....I just frame the paper, the frame has a backing plate. I use either Sennelier La Carte, or AS Colourfix or Wallis sanded....all of which are strong enough on their own to use.
The frames I use have a hardboard backing...
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Sep-2014/33616-frame.jpg

robertsloan2
09-09-2014, 08:58 AM
I've read about the passe-partout and could see it sometime, but haven't done it. Or mounted anything on board. Part of it is just that the frames I use don't really have space for more than a mat and a back board. If I did a double layer I'd have to add more layers of foam core and use the groove for backboard mounts that's set up for 3/4" canvas instead of flat. I just frame the paper.

I did do it once with an Ampersand board though, worked out fine.

*Deirdre*
09-09-2014, 09:11 AM
I've read about the passe-partout and could see it sometime, but haven't done it. Or mounted anything on board. Part of it is just that the frames I use don't really have space for more than a mat and a back board. If I did a double layer I'd have to add more layers of foam core and use the groove for backboard mounts that's set up for 3/4" canvas instead of flat. I just frame the paper.

I did do it once with an Ampersand board though, worked out fine.
According to wickepedia...Passe-Partout (or passepartout) is the French term for a mat, a paper or, more usually, cardboard sheet with a cutout, which is placed under the glass in a picture frame. A picture (a photo or print, drawing, etc.) is placed beneath it, with the cutout framing it. The passe-partout serves two purposes: first, to prevent the image from touching the glass, and second, to frame the image and enhance its visual appeal. The cutout in the passe-partout is usually beveled to avoid casting shadows on the picture. The word may also be used for the tape used to stick the back of the picture to its frame. The term "mount" is used in British English.

If that's the case, that is probably how most of us do it!

robertsloan2
09-09-2014, 09:15 AM
Love it, yeah! I cut mats. I got a mat cutter and ever since have preferred matting to not matting. A custom mat opening can crop a lot of ills!

DAK723
09-09-2014, 09:25 AM
Dakota sells many of the popular papers pre-mounted to a board. If I work on paper, I usually don't permanently mount it to a backing board, rather, I "hinge-tape" it to the backing board. Hinge-taping only on the top edge allows the paper to expand and contract with changes in temp and humidity even while in the frame. Some lesser ways of mounting - with spray adhesives, for example - can result in buckling and air bubbles. It depends on the thickness of the paper and the type of adhesive - at least in my experience.

Dry mounting with heat and a dry-mount press is a good method, but , as mentioned , uses expensive equipment. Many years ago I had some paper mounted in this way by a local framing shop. I believe they were reasonably priced. Not sure ho many framing shops offer this, but it may be worth checking it out.

Most frames I have bought have enough room for backing board as thick as foam board - but if you have a mat or double mat as well then you want to make sure the frame is deep enough.

Don

artistat38
09-09-2014, 10:33 PM
Thank you so much Robert, Dierdre and Don for all this useful information....it is very helpful....I usually just frame the paper with the existing mat and frame too but after watching the videos was wondering if I was doing something wrong....glad to know that it is one of the normal ways of doing it....

Prashanti.