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pherank
09-07-2014, 02:16 AM
I would like to come up with a transparent watercolor mix that mimics this unusual rose color (and avoid using any white since I would like to have multiple glazes) - any suggestions?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2014/981771-__rose_colors_-_salmon_orange_pink.jpg

Patrick1
09-07-2014, 04:33 AM
In oils or acrylics, it looks like orange or a reddish orange + a bit of Burnt Sienna to dull it down a bit, tinted with white.

But since you want transparent watercolors and no white, I'd try some transparent versions of reddish orange and Burnt Sienna, layered to get the right depth of color. Or a lemon yellow + magenta ...this will give a slightly dull orange like that.

indraneel
09-07-2014, 07:50 AM
Dilute light red with lots of water? Maybe the tiniest hint of PV19 rose if required? Do check the available light reds, as it's a synthetic iron oxide and comes in a great variety of hues.

Mythrill
09-07-2014, 08:57 AM
Dilute light red with lots of water? Maybe the tiniest hint of PV19 rose if required? Do check the available light reds, as it's a synthetic iron oxide and comes in a great variety of hues.

Indra, you're definitely on track here. A yellow "Light Red" (either PR 101 or PR 102), mixed with white, does the trick nicely.

If you want a single pigment and just tint it with water, Winsor & Newton offers "Indian Red Deep" (PBr 25), a synthetic organic pigment which seems to have excellent lightfastness. Here's the Dickblick swatch:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2014/96427-00319_IndianRedDeep-l.jpg

indraneel
09-07-2014, 11:58 AM
Thanks Mythrill! The pigment makers here sell PR101 as red 50, 80, 110, 160.... right till 1000. Higher numbers are darker. I have no idea what the numbers mean. Light red for me is iron oxide red 200 and gives nice shades. red 800 is like a purplish Indian red. Problem with the deeper reds is that they go from deep to light very quickly with not much midtone, probably due to the larger particle size.

Mythrill
09-07-2014, 12:58 PM
Thanks Mythrill! The pigment makers here sell PR101 as red 50, 80, 110, 160.... right till 1000. Higher numbers are darker. I have no idea what the numbers mean. Light red for me is iron oxide red 200 and gives nice shades. red 800 is like a purplish Indian red. Problem with the deeper reds is that they go from deep to light very quickly with not much midtone, probably due to the larger particle size.

Hi, Indra!

Are you using Titanium White (PW 6) to lighten them?

It could be your Titanium White is too strong. You might want to weaken it by mixing it with filler (oleogel in oils and gel medium in acrylics) and then try mixing that with your red oxides. You'll get much more control on the lightening.

pherank
09-07-2014, 06:59 PM
Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I do think that using some Burnt Sienna and perhaps lemon yellow with a pale rose might get me on track. I'll try these out during the week...

indraneel
09-08-2014, 12:19 AM
Hi, Indra!

Are you using Titanium White (PW 6) to lighten them?

It could be your Titanium White is too strong. You might want to weaken it by mixing it with filler (oleogel in oils and gel medium in acrylics) and then try mixing that with your red oxides. You'll get much more control on the lightening.

No titanium white for watercolors, where the difference is most pronounced. Titanium white, talc and PCC for pastels, but that is easier to control... given unlimited time for mixing :lol:

Gigalot
09-08-2014, 04:39 AM
Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I do think that using some Burnt Sienna and perhaps lemon yellow with a pale rose might get me on track. I'll try these out during the week...
You need blue paint, some areas have bluish color and are dark. Pure Burnt Sienna, used to paint darks, gives you highly saturated color, while you need something to de-saturate it. Flowers must be done with a lot of colors. The good way to limit palette without color gamut limitation is to have CMY on your palette. I see, you have Lemon Yellow and Magenta-rose. Do not miss Cyan - Indantrene Blue or Ultamarine.

pherank
09-08-2014, 04:12 PM
Do not miss Cyan - Indantrene Blue or Ultamarine.

Thank you - I will have to try various combinations...

opainter
09-09-2014, 12:05 AM
Indra, you're definitely on track here. A yellow "Light Red" (either PR 101 or PR 102), mixed with white, does the trick nicely.

If you want a single pigment and just tint it with water, Winsor & Newton offers "Indian Red Deep" (PBr 25), a synthetic organic pigment which seems to have excellent lightfastness. Here's the Dickblick swatch:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2014/96427-00319_IndianRedDeep-l.jpg
Winsor & Newton came out with six "limited edition" colors on March 15, 2014, and Indian Red Deep is one of them. They are, according to the W&N website (http://www.winsornewton.com/na/discover/articles-and-inspiration/introducing-6-new-professional-water-colours-inspired-by-deserts-us), "inspired by deserts." Deserts as in "Sahara," not "Apple Pie"! :lol: This is a beautiful color, and I discovered that Liquitex and Da Vinci have acrylic versions of this color. (Which I just had to buy!)

Tomtefco
09-12-2014, 09:29 PM
My color swatch mix of Daniel Smith Quin Rose (PV19) and Yellow Ocher (PY43) looks pretty close. Playing around with the ratios would probably let you dial it in.

bruin70
09-13-2014, 02:12 AM
look for something close instead of "starting from scratch"...you'll get there faster. try some coral reds/corals or some such from different makers.