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View Full Version : Genuine Ultramarine Blue Extraction Video


Brian Firth
08-27-2014, 09:56 PM
I had not seen this video before. It is from masterpigments.com and shows the extraction process from lapis lazuli to make Fra Angelico Bllue. It is pretty interesting.

http://youtu.be/JBzEAt_ynvc

Mythrill
08-27-2014, 11:06 PM
I had not seen this video before. It is from masterpigments.com and shows the extraction process from lapis lazuli to make Fra Angelico Bllue. It is pretty interesting.

http://youtu.be/JBzEAt_ynvc
Thanks for sharing this video, Brian. While I can't afford Fra Angelico myself, I like how masterpigments made the process more transparent!

cb3
09-08-2014, 05:19 PM
Cool. thanks!

Here is another fun video
A story of blue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2JZDdKtZ0Q

indraneel
09-09-2014, 10:49 AM
I'm genuinely pleased to live in this century and buy ultramarine at $4 a kilo instead of $40'000!

Thanks for the video links!

Gigalot
09-09-2014, 11:35 AM
Thanks for sharing this video, Brian!
Hope to see a new video how to make genuine Indian Yellow pigment!

indraneel
09-09-2014, 01:52 PM
Tried to purchase genuine Indian yellow last year in Mumbai... but being a medicine (in capsules), was terribly expensive.... OTOH, mango trees are in full bloom here, and filled with parakeets.. saw some this evening.

Brian Firth
09-09-2014, 11:48 PM
cb3, Thanks, that's another great fascinating video I hadn't seen.

indraneel, It would be great to see genuine Indian yellow! It's one of the few historic pigments that there is virtually no first hand information available on the internet or anywhere else. I just recently acquired a tube of genuine emerald green, the toxic arsenic pigment, that I had searched for for many years to find.

opainter
09-09-2014, 11:53 PM
Tried to purchase genuine Indian yellow last year in Mumbai... but being a medicine (in capsules), was terribly expensive.... OTOH, mango trees are in full bloom here, and filled with parakeets.. saw some this evening.

I can only imagine the medicinal effects that Indian yellow might have, hi! :lol:

indraneel
09-10-2014, 10:47 AM
Brian, I was only kidding. It was dried cow urine, not labeled as "Indian yellow", but it was a dirty yellow in color. I'm guessing that it may not have been pure either. However, it was expensive, even though they were selling it from a shop on the farm (with the said cows). I asked many questions but part of the farm was closed that day, so no real answers.

I did get a bottle of honey produced on the farm (not labeled "medicinal" :crossfingers: ), and it was quite nice!

Mythrill
09-10-2014, 06:47 PM
Brian, I was only kidding. It was dried cow urine, not labeled as "Indian yellow", but it was a dirty yellow in color. I'm guessing that it may not have been pure either. However, it was expensive, even though they were selling it from a shop on the farm (with the said cows). I asked many questions but part of the farm was closed that day, so no real answers.

I did get a bottle of honey produced on the farm (not labeled "medicinal" :crossfingers: ), and it was quite nice!

People suspect today historical Indian Yellow (NY 20) was really the extract of some plants. Chemically, the closest equivalent would be Magnesium Euxanthate (PY 108), which Daniel Smith does sell!

http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-284-600-045-LIST

They only sell it in watercolors, though.

Brian Firth
09-11-2014, 12:58 AM
indraneel, I think I saw a special on TV recently where they were in India and went to a farm that offered the medicinal cow urine you speak of! Possibly on the hilarious English show An Idiot Abroad?

I have heard that there is doubt to the old cow urine story, however they are still far from conclusively knowing the source of historic Indian Yellow.

However, PY108 is not magnesium euxanthate. I have the dry pigment from Kremer ( http://shop.kremerpigments.com/en/pigments/pigments-of-modern-age/organic-pigments/pyramid-yellow-medium-23370:.html ). It is not even the same chemical compound and it has no fluorescent qualities like real Indian Yellow is reported to have. It's an organic anthraquinone pigment with chemical formula C30H15N3O4, having no magnesium in its composition.

Gigalot
09-11-2014, 05:40 AM
indraneel, I think I saw a special on TV recently where they were in India and went to a farm that offered the medicinal cow urine you speak of! Possibly on the hilarious English show An Idiot Abroad?

I have heard that there is doubt to the old cow urine story, however they are still far from conclusively knowing the source of historic Indian Yellow.

However, PY108 is not magnesium euxanthate. I have the dry pigment from Kremer ( http://shop.kremerpigments.com/en/pigments/pigments-of-modern-age/organic-pigments/pyramid-yellow-medium-23370:.html ). It is not even the same chemical compound and it has no fluorescent qualities like real Indian Yellow is reported to have. It's an organic anthraquinone pigment with chemical formula C30H15N3O4, having no magnesium in its composition.

I am really surprised, how old, moderately lightfast organic pigments, suddenly began to become 8.8.8 BWS! "True - it's just something that should be considered as true anyway!" :D I checked www.artiscreation.com/ and there are a lot of new, magically transformed from fugitive to a 8.8.8 BWS information about pigments. Just interesting, how 6.4.2 BWS in "Industrial organic pigments" book had become 8.8.8 in www.artiscreation.com!

Mythrill
09-11-2014, 07:57 AM
However, PY108 is not magnesium euxanthate. I have the dry pigment from Kremer ( http://shop.kremerpigments.com/en/pigments/pigments-of-modern-age/organic-pigments/pyramid-yellow-medium-23370:.html ). It is not even the same chemical compound and it has no fluorescent qualities like real Indian Yellow is reported to have. It's an organic anthraquinone pigment with chemical formula C30H15N3O4, having no magnesium in its composition.

Thanks, Brian. I'm sorry about the mistake.

Mythrill
09-11-2014, 08:24 AM
I am really surprised, how old, moderately lightfast organic pigments, suddenly began to become 8.8.8 BWS! "True - it's just something that should be considered as true anyway!" :D I checked www.artiscreation.com/ (http://www.artiscreation.com/) and there are a lot of new, magically transformed from fugitive to a 8.8.8 BWS information about pigments. Just interesting, how 6.4.2 BWS in "Industrial organic pigments" book had become 8.8.8 in www.artiscreation.com (http://www.artiscreation.com)!

Hi, Giga!

Synthetic organic pigments are really flexible on manufacture, so that's why there's a lot of room for improvement on lightfastness.

A big example of that is Maimeri's PR122. A few testers confirmed handprint.com's report that it's clearly more lightfast than the average.

Gigalot
09-11-2014, 10:31 AM
PY108 is ASTM II pigment. It can't match 8.8.8 in BWS. It is BWS6 pigment. 8,8,8 in blue wool scale means "Absolutely lightfast" stuff. I think, this 8.8.8 is an advertisement speculation. ASTM II means that it is lightfast in masstone but moderately lightfast in tints. Pigments, which has the same BWS index in all tints and masstone are ASTM I stuff, because ASTM I properties include lightfastness in tints while ASTM II not.

Dioscuri
09-23-2014, 09:29 PM
I'm genuinely pleased to live in this century and buy ultramarine at $4 a kilo instead of $40'000!

Thanks for the video links!

Amen to that!

Dioscuri
09-23-2014, 09:30 PM
Thanks for posting this video, that was fascinating to watch.