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D_Harris
08-07-2014, 07:19 PM
I just picked up a couple tubes of Windsor & Newton Griffin Alkyd Fast Drying Oil paint. Phthalo Blue(Series 1 Permanence A) and Alizarin Crimson(Series 2 Permanence A) cheap.

I know they are probably not the desired choice for two out of three colors for a three color palette, but was still hoping for a recommendation on which yellow I should get to complete the set.

(Or perhaps I should just make two three color sets out of what I have?).

Any ideas would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Brian Firth
08-07-2014, 08:05 PM
Sticking with the Winsor and Newton Alkyds, I'd get the Winsor Yellow. It's Hansa yellow PY74, a good primary yellow which mixes both good greens and oranges.

Gigalot
08-08-2014, 04:44 AM
PY74 is good primary yellow. Only one disadvantage with this paint is that it is not transparent, so you can't mix dark colors with it. The only transparent yellow, which is good for this purpose is W&N artist's Transparent yellow PY128.

Mythrill
08-08-2014, 08:57 AM
PY74 is good primary yellow. Only one disadvantage with this paint is that it is not transparent, so you can't mix dark colors with it. The only transparent yellow, which is good for this purpose is W&N artist's Transparent yellow PY128.

Giga, PY74 has opaque and transparent versions (different particle sizes). But I suppose PY128 may be more all-around and transparent.

Gigalot
08-08-2014, 09:56 AM
Giga, PY74 has opaque and transparent versions (different particle sizes). But I suppose PY128 may be more all-around and transparent.

In oil. PY74 is mostly, semitransparent paint. I have it and it is mud-maker pigment if you try to mix dark, deep colors with it. If you do not ned mud, then you may try PY128 or, if this PY128 pait is problematic to find, then two pigments, Transparent Mars brown Pbr6 or Burnt umber PBr7 for darks and PY74 for light colors can be used as a replacement of one Transparent yellow PY128 pigment. But Darren Harris talks about only 3 pigments. Therefore, nothing can replace PY128 if you don't have black or deep brown pigment on your palette.

Brian Firth
08-08-2014, 02:57 PM
The Indian Yellow in Griffin Alkyds is transparent PY139 and a versatile mixer as well.

D_Harris
08-13-2014, 08:33 PM
Thanks everyone.

I'll keep an eye out for PY128.

I do already have 0.4oz tubes of the following:
Lamp Black #25: PBk6
Titanium White #40: PW4
Permanent Alizarin Crimson #1: PR177
French Ultramarine #21: PB29
Cadmium Yellow Pale Hue #8: PY74
Veridian Hue #43: PG7
Burnt Umber #3: PBr7
Yellow Ochre #44: PY42

Along with two 1.25oz tubes of Cadmium Red Light and Mixing White.

So I just figured I'd need to balance out the amount I have by adding a yellow to the the extra "red" and "Blue" colors I picked up.

Thanks again.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Mythrill
08-14-2014, 06:06 PM
Thanks everyone.

I'll keep an eye out for PY128.

I do already have 0.4oz tubes of the following:
Lamp Black #25: PBk6
Titanium White #40: PW4
Permanent Alizarin Crimson #1: PR177
French Ultramarine #21: PB29
Cadmium Yellow Pale Hue #8: PY74
Veridian Hue #43: PG7
Burnt Umber #3: PBr7
Yellow Ochre #44: PY42

Along with two 1.25oz tubes of Cadmium Red Light and Mixing White.

So I just figured I'd need to balance out the amount I have by adding a yellow to the the extra "red" and "Blue" colors I picked up.

Thanks again.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Hi, Darren!

What you have there is Zinc White (PW 4), not Titanium White (PW 6). It is much more transparent and a bit cooler.

D_Harris
08-17-2014, 07:33 PM
Hi, Darren!

What you have there is Zinc White (PW 4), not Titanium White (PW 6). It is much more transparent and a bit cooler.
Actually I do have Titanium white. It's the #40 shown in the row of 1.25oz tubes in the pic. The one next to it is mixing white. (The "blue" and "red" in question are on the right of those).

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Crystal1
08-17-2014, 11:06 PM
Are you planning to mix the Griffin Alkyd with the regular oils?

D_Harris
08-18-2014, 05:37 PM
Are you planning to mix the Griffin Alkyd with the regular oils?

Nope. That wasn't the plan, which is why I asked about a "yellow" to go with the other two Griffin Alkyd oils. (But I'm open to any and all recommendations).

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Crystal1
08-18-2014, 10:28 PM
Better experts than me have given you information on a good yellow, but you will still need a Griffin Alkyd in Titanium White. The Mixing White is a very weak white and you could probably use your whole tube of mixing white to get a bit of a light color. The PY139 in Indian Yellow is the only yellow that is available from WN Griffin Alkyd that has been mentioned on this page. Hope this helps. God bless you.

D_Harris
08-19-2014, 08:14 PM
Better experts than me have given you information on a good yellow, but you will still need a Griffin Alkyd in Titanium White. The Mixing White is a very weak white and you could probably use your whole tube of mixing white to get a bit of a light color. The PY139 in Indian Yellow is the only yellow that is available from WN Griffin Alkyd that has been mentioned on this page. Hope this helps. God bless you.

According to Gigalot nothing can replace PY128, since I'm using only three colors because I can mix dark colors with it. But are you saying it is not available?

Either way it comes down to PY128 or PY139, and a Griffin Alkyd in Titanium White, correct?

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

Crystal1
08-21-2014, 06:06 PM
PY128 is not available in WN Griffin Alkyds, as far as I can see, at least not at dickblick.com. The PY128 is available as a WN Artist Oil paint, but only as a regular oil paint. According to dickblick, they have either PY74 and PY139 available in WN Griffin Alkyds. I myself would prefer PY139 because it's usually transparent, but none of the yellows looked transparent to me. If you go to dickblick.com, and enter into the search box: Winsor Newton Griffin Alkyds, then you can see all the colors that are available. There is a small green paddle on the left of each line, if you click on the paddle you'll see a large paint sample and will find the pigment nbr. I hope it all works for you. I sweat over it everytime that I buy new colors, but the dickblick chart really helps. Happy Painting.

Gigalot
08-21-2014, 06:18 PM
PY139 and PY110 are transparent reddish versions of yellow. They are not equal to PY128, but both are gorgeous colours! :)

D_Harris
09-02-2014, 08:16 PM
Would the PY128 on this page suffice?
http://www.pegasusart.co.uk/1811/Cobra-Water-Mixable-Oil-Paints---Artist-Quality-70-Cobra-x-40ml.html

P.S.: Is there anyway to search all of the threads that I started on this site?

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

WFMartin
09-03-2014, 12:39 AM
This is really funny. I've been recommending the use of PY128 as a transparent version of the primary color, Yellow, for years on this site, and my recommendation has been largely ignored.::lol:

Now, for some reason, all the reasons I offered for its use are being presented in this forum by others, and what is the choice of paint for which it is being recommended? Alkyd paint--a medium in which it is probably not available. Go figure.:rolleyes:

All I can offer to this search is that Winsor & Newton is just about the only brand that offers it, but only in their traditional oil paint. There is another brand that I found a long time ago, after searching, and that is Rembrandt. They also offer PY128 Transparent Yellow, but again.....it is only in traditional oil paint, not alkyd.

As many in this thread have already mentioned, and as I have been mentioning for a long time, as well: Transparent colors mix darks much better than opaque colors, especially when dealing with the primary colors. The PY128 is a rather good representative of Primary Yellow, in a transparent form. I've been using it for years, and with rather good success.:)

And, for what it may be worth, W & N Permanent Rose 502, or Grumbacher Thalo Red Rose (each, PV19), represent a much better choice of the primary color, Magenta, than any form of Alizarin Crimson. And, it, too, is transparent. :wave: While there may be several, tubed versions of "Magenta", and while those colors actually may plot closer to the spoke of the wheel representing hue, they do so at a noticeable sacrifice of chroma. A true primary must not only fall on [or near] the proper "hue spoke" of the color wheel, but to be considered an appropriate primary color, it must also plot at, or near the outer circumference of the wheel, and PV19 does that much better than most other tubed colors, labeled "Magenta".

Gigalot
09-03-2014, 06:52 AM
I found this paint for a long time, regardless of other artists. Five years ago.
But, I am totally agree with Bill about this colour. And it is more permanent than Hansa class of pigments.

I had never try Cobra, but what can be wrong with it? Water mixable paints are compatible with other oil paints. Just do not mix it with water, use good, trusted medium!

Crystal1
09-03-2014, 06:50 PM
If you have decided to use watermixable oils, then Cobra's Transparent Yellow, PY128 should work. The color in this brand is quite a bit lighter than Winsor Newton's and Rembrandt. I think it would still be a good color to work with, though. Good Luck.

Patrick1
09-04-2014, 12:33 PM
If you have decided to use watermixable oils, then Cobra's Transparent Yellow, PY128 should work. The color in this brand is quite a bit lighter than Winsor Newton's and Rembrandt.
Thanks for sharing that tidbit of info - I was going to buy the Cobra Transparent Yellow. For me this is very important because that suggests that Cobra's PY128 is not as transparent as the others, or less pigmented (assuming the hue is similar and not more lemony). If a yellow looks dark and 'barfy' or brownish in masstone but is brilliant in undertone and tints, that's a good thing for me :) . I like to have one yellow that is as transparent as possible for making deep, rich mixes that an opaque yellow can't (the opaque yellow will mix almost as though there is some white in the mix).