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jakertanner
07-31-2014, 01:33 PM
Hello again,

I was going mad as I received a sample of a beautiful colored blue pastel board and it had no name sticker on it. I brought it to the local pro art store, and they really were stumped as well..which I guess I don't blame them as I brought it in used with pastels..harder to tell what it was...anyway, today the mystery is solved! It was Colourfix by Art Spectrum.

What a wonderful surface..it took layer upon layer of pastel pencils, Art Spectrum soft pastel and Unison, where after 10 layers, it still covered completely where it was easily discernible what color the Unison or Art Spectrum was...I was amazed..does anyone else feel this board is great? If so why, and if NOT, also why? If you don't mind.

Always looking forward to your replies...learning is fun. Hope it's not too much of an amateur question.

Pencils used were: Caran, Stabilo, Pitt, Conte, and Gioconda which were my favorite along with the Contes.

sansea
08-01-2014, 08:47 AM
Colorfix board or paper are wonderful substrates for pastel , I like to buy the ten pack of cool or warm colors.Recently found a ten pack of white and I like them best because I can do an underpainting better. I am also newly hooked on U art and am experimenting with different grades , thus far I like the too thier grades as feels like Wallis which as far as I know is not available now. I bought a sample pack of uart on Amazon for a nominal amount . Enjoy the adventure of pastels .

jakertanner
08-01-2014, 10:03 AM
Colorfix board or paper are wonderful substrates for pastel , I like to buy the ten pack of cool or warm colors.Recently found a ten pack of white and I like them best because I can do an underpainting better. I am also newly hooked on U art and am experimenting with different grades , thus far I like the too thier grades as feels like Wallis which as far as I know is not available now. I bought a sample pack of uart on Amazon for a nominal amount . Enjoy the adventure of pastels .

Hi...I love their deep blue colored bard. Are you using the paper from Colourfix or their hard boards? Not even sure if there is a distinction. I am supposed to be receiving a bunch of samples from Uart of their paper..I would love to try it. I have also been toying with the idea of just creating my own surfaces, maybe on gatorboard with a simple Golden gesso or pumice for pastels.

Thanks for your reply...

robertsloan2
08-01-2014, 08:14 PM
I love that deep blue and all the Colourfix colors. Back in Arkansas, I bought all twenty colors of primer. That's the inexpensive way to use Colourfix as a sanded pastel surface. I got packs of 20 rainbow pack (same as the warm and cool packs one of each), but would do practice paper by priming watercolor paper with 2 or 3 thin coats of the primer.

Here, I got the Supertooth grit primer and the clear, but haven't replaced all the colors because I'm waiting for that box to be shipped and it was a big investment. So I use underpaintings with it. Cheap watercolor paper turns into practice and sketch paper with the same lovely surface, so I've gotten more practice with Colourfix than all other sanded surfaces. It's right up there with Canson Mi Tientes as a must have. If it takes too long to get those boxes I'll break down and start getting the colored primers again. Using them on all-rag watercolor paper or board will produce the same quality as the printed board.

Use a foam brush with the primer and lay one layer down going one way, the next the other, smooth it a bit. It dries fast like acrylic paint. I leave a border between the primed area and the edges, also most people like to prime the backs of boards so the board doesn't warp as it dries. I had that happen once but it doesn't always - and the back can be primed with cheaper plain gesso.

Which is more trouble than it's worth if you prefer buying the good board. Board vs. paper is really a choice in how you work. The paper has the same surface but has to be clipped or taped to a drawing board. I usually just prime mat scrap, especially since I started using good all rag mats.

sansea
08-01-2014, 10:10 PM
To follow up with my post , all the info you received from Robert is important and you couldn't get better advice. I will just add that I feel the same about colorfix , you can't go wrong using all the wonderful colors.i use board only for convenience when painting plein air .I use the paper most of the time and love it .I am really liking the uart I have tried too.
As to making your own sanded paper I use Liquitex clear gesso ,wich has grit in it and apply to either tinted or painted watercolor paper or mat board .
I like that for practice painting or small paintings and it's cheap !
Pastels are such a wonderful medium and wonderful to work with on almost any surface . I started painting when all that was available was mi tientes so the sanded paper is so perfect for me because I can layer and layer as you mentioned.
Just keep trying all the great new stuff available . Have fun!

jakertanner
08-01-2014, 10:41 PM
I love that deep blue and all the Colourfix colors. Back in Arkansas, I bought all twenty colors of primer. That's the inexpensive way to use Colourfix as a sanded pastel surface. I got packs of 20 rainbow pack (same as the warm and cool packs one of each), but would do practice paper by priming watercolor paper with 2 or 3 thin coats of the primer.

Here, I got the Supertooth grit primer and the clear, but haven't replaced all the colors because I'm waiting for that box to be shipped and it was a big investment. So I use underpaintings with it. Cheap watercolor paper turns into practice and sketch paper with the same lovely surface, so I've gotten more practice with Colourfix than all other sanded surfaces. It's right up there with Canson Mi Tientes as a must have. If it takes too long to get those boxes I'll break down and start getting the colored primers again. Using them on all-rag watercolor paper or board will produce the same quality as the printed board.

Use a foam brush with the primer and lay one layer down going one way, the next the other, smooth it a bit. It dries fast like acrylic paint. I leave a border between the primed area and the edges, also most people like to prime the backs of boards so the board doesn't warp as it dries. I had that happen once but it doesn't always - and the back can be primed with cheaper plain gesso.

Which is more trouble than it's worth if you prefer buying the good board. Board vs. paper is really a choice in how you work. The paper has the same surface but has to be clipped or taped to a drawing board. I usually just prime mat scrap, especially since I started using good all rag mats.

Hey Robert,

I think I am going down the road to eventually making my own surface, once i get a feel for all the surfaces I have samples for, I will know better how rough I would like it. I have been looking at the Golden Gesso made for pastels, I was going to try it straight out of the jar, no water added, with a bit of pastel dust or Colourfix' colored primers added. I think I am going to prefer using boards over paper, for the stability, so I may use gatorboard as my support, or wood..not really sure. initially, I was thinking of the small wooden plaques you get from Walmart, or any craft store, like $1 each, then prime those for my flower series.

Thanks for the suggestions.

jakertanner
08-01-2014, 10:44 PM
To follow up with my post , all the info you received from Robert is important and you couldn't get better advice. I will just add that I feel the same about colorfix , you can't go wrong using all the wonderful colors.i use board only for convenience when painting plein air .I use the paper most of the time and love it .I am really liking the uart I have tried too.
As to making your own sanded paper I use Liquitex clear gesso ,wich has grit in it and apply to either tinted or painted watercolor paper or mat board .
I like that for practice painting or small paintings and it's cheap !
Pastels are such a wonderful medium and wonderful to work with on almost any surface . I started painting when all that was available was mi tientes so the sanded paper is so perfect for me because I can layer and layer as you mentioned.
Just keep trying all the great new stuff available . Have fun!


Thanks for your reply,

I will certainly look into the Liquitex...still not sure which direction I want to go. I do love the texture of the Colourfix, and also the grittier Wallis. So I will need to find something in between...still have yet to sample the Ampersand museum boards I got...I have a feeling i am going to prefer those..or try to make something similar.

Thanks!! And I agree, Robert has been very helpful and generous with his input and time.

robertsloan2
08-01-2014, 10:51 PM
Jake, if you're mixing grit into your surface, you may be interested in looking at the different grits available. Pumice comes in various grits and I think marble dust does too. The grits are cheap by themselves and I think getting it at a hardware store gives a lifetime supply for just a few dollars.

Those little wooden plaques finished with a grit primer would be striking. The main problem with that is that pastels ought to be glazed. Something might be done with shadowboxing them.

Wood panels go easily into small frames though and boards or boxwood as surface gives you another option - with a clear primer, you can use the wood texture as your base color and let part of it show. Lots of possibilities.

jakertanner
08-02-2014, 01:07 AM
Jake, if you're mixing grit into your surface, you may be interested in looking at the different grits available. Pumice comes in various grits and I think marble dust does too. The grits are cheap by themselves and I think getting it at a hardware store gives a lifetime supply for just a few dollars.

Those little wooden plaques finished with a grit primer would be striking. The main problem with that is that pastels ought to be glazed. Something might be done with shadowboxing them.

Wood panels go easily into small frames though and boards or boxwood as surface gives you another option - with a clear primer, you can use the wood texture as your base color and let part of it show. Lots of possibilities.

great suggestion about the clear primer. Will do some research on it, thanks Robert.

Dedrian
08-02-2014, 12:47 PM
great suggestion about the clear primer. Will do some research on it, thanks Robert.
Along those lines, has anyone tried the Lascaux Pastel Ground? I am wondering how it compares to other primers?