PDA

View Full Version : A Late Progress Journal


Nuunc
07-29-2014, 08:55 PM
Good evening everyone! My name is Vero and I'm 23, with a goal to start drawing at a later age than most.

Thing was, I was -supposed- to start about 6 months ago. And I drew some but kept breaking down and telling myself -not good enough, you'll never catch up-

But that's it- I am determined to make sketches, basic or project- whichever- to progress. To draw despite my excuses or pessimism. And so starting tomorrow I will be uploading what I have drawn that day. I'm sure the beginning will look like child drawing but I truly want to improve and feel no passion in anything but this- so it shall begin.

I dream that I will reach a skill level that inspires others that aren't the "drawing since a child" type to not be afraid at grabbing a pencil for the first time and sketching out a dream.

faithgracecrafts
07-30-2014, 12:27 AM
I'm so proud of you Vero! I'm 50 and just starting, so you have lots of time yet! Really looking forward to seeing your progress. Just remember that you are doing it for yourself and to have fun.
Doni

vhere
07-30-2014, 02:45 AM
I teach adults and currently (as often before) have 2 people your age in my class who are total beginners. It's never too late.

In one year they have both reached a really good standard.

It's about practice practice practice. Read art books, look at work in galleries contemporary as well as past and gradually understand how they achieved what they did. And of course ... Here.

I would strongly suggest finding a class. You learn as much from your fellow students as you do from the tutor. What they do, the questions they ask etc all feed your knowledge. Everyone started out making mistakes, thinking their work just a mess ... a good teacher can point out what is going well, how to fix what isn't and recognise your natural way of working, which is individual. Your work shouldn't be the same as anyone else.

Oh and there are some good videos on YouTube Proko TV for figures, Shirley Trevena for loose watercolour amongst others

If you want to do it you will.. Just draw or paint every day and do a lot of work from life as you learn most from that. Just take a single object. I get my beginners to draw feathers as you have form, texture, light and colour to consider but can put it on the page right next to where you are drawing.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jul-2014/53888-image.jpg

This is a demo I did.

Learn to look really hard and draw what IS there, not what you think is there.

Good luck :)

DrDebby
07-30-2014, 02:46 PM
It's not too late. I started a few years ago. And, it's true, I don't practice near enough, but I'm learning little by little. By the way, I'm 56. There are things that are a mess and things that surprise me by being pretty good. Not perfect, but pretty good. Go for it.

Nuunc
07-30-2014, 10:38 PM
1. As I said before and the drawings might not look very good now, but I am determined and my goal is to impress at the end of the year in my progress. But since it's the first day and I am not going to insult myself lol (I'm my worst critique thus why it took a year to get started)

2.Sorry for the crappy quality photo, I promise it'll improve:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jul-2014/1775952-IMG_2344.JPG

Here's day one, I'm working on creating 3 dimensional shapes and turning those shapes into the finer detail of furniture. Which I will probably be practicing for awhile.

Thank you Doni and DrDebby for the kind words-
And that is a very good example vhere, I'll definitely have to use a feather in the future as a project. Also I am indeed using a book for now and reading along as I practice. Once I get some money on the side (Currently bills take it all) and I will definitely be going for art classes. Hopefully by then and my confidence will be better as well.

Thank you everyone for the support!

Carole A
07-30-2014, 11:13 PM
Good for you Vero. I'm inspired by your determination. What better way to start than with the basics.

:thumbsup:

DrDebby
07-31-2014, 02:31 PM
Starting with basic shapes getting dimensionality is great. At least furniture stays still while you draw it. :)

Nuunc
07-31-2014, 10:02 PM
Lol true that, I had a birthday party today and a doctor appointment so I am already needing to be ready for bed before getting practice in. I was going to do some more sketches of furniture though was wondering if I should put hours into drawing multiple medium sketches of furniture or use the how sheet up for one furniture?

DrDebby
08-01-2014, 01:18 PM
Do whatever is less boring and more enticing. That will keep you practicing. Using different media will let you figure out what you like to work with. For instance I am in awe of pen and ink. Yet, I can't get mine to come out right. But, give me colored pencil and I'm happy to continue even when it doesn't come out.

vhere
08-02-2014, 04:27 AM
And charcoal is wonderful (willow charcoal) as it is so easily changed and gives lovely painterly tones.

My students who were initially reluctant to try it all ended up loving it.

Nuunc
08-04-2014, 10:25 PM
Thanks everyone and perhaps I'll try out charcoal, I do have some! Sorry for the delay as well, I was house sitting for someone and it was hard drawing with their puppy chewing on the sketch book as well as spilling water on it. At least it's only practice work! XD But I'll give more daily updates after tonight.

I'll indeed try different medias as well! I just wanted to get a good form going first. (I noticed I drew with my wrist so I've been trying to draw circles, triangles and squares using my elbow and shoulder in the right corner, lol)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Aug-2014/1775952-IMG_2351.JPG

Marmsk
08-05-2014, 07:15 AM
I teach adults and currently (as often before) have 2 people your age in my class who are total beginners. It's never too late.

In one year they have both reached a really good standard.

It's about practice practice practice. Read art books, look at work in galleries contemporary as well as past and gradually understand how they achieved what they did. And of course ... Here.

I would strongly suggest finding a class. You learn as much from your fellow students as you do from the tutor. What they do, the questions they ask etc all feed your knowledge. Everyone started out making mistakes, thinking their work just a mess ... a good teacher can point out what is going well, how to fix what isn't and recognise your natural way of working, which is individual. Your work shouldn't be the same as anyone else.

Oh and there are some good videos on YouTube Proko TV for figures, Shirley Trevena for loose watercolour amongst others

If you want to do it you will.. Just draw or paint every day and do a lot of work from life as you learn most from that. Just take a single object. I get my beginners to draw feathers as you have form, texture, light and colour to consider but can put it on the page right next to where you are drawing.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jul-2014/53888-image.jpg

This is a demo I did.

Learn to look really hard and draw what IS there, not what you think is there.

Good luck :)
Such good advice!

DrDebby
08-05-2014, 03:21 PM
Hard to draw with puppy around, but a puppy is so much fun. Great practice sketches.

robertsloan2
08-06-2014, 09:42 AM
Oh, puppies are dangerous to sketchbooks! Cats just lay on them when I want to draw and demand attention first. Well done! Both pages of exercises are coming along gorgeous. Your furniture's got good dimension and relative proportions. Eyeballing perspective is a useful skill and most furnishings are in some way cubical or geometric.

Practice pages like these are one of the best ways to become familiar with it. I can see your progress from the first ones to the second page, you're learning fast! Great sketchbook start. I also liked the cans you put in the first one.

Getting the ellipses right on cups, cans, bowls, plates and so on is a challenge to serious artists. I know some high paid professionals who have problems with them sometimes - keeping them symmetrical and getting both top and bottom curves right on a cylinder is tough. Keep doing those. Vases and glasses without flowers will make future still lifes accurate and powerful.

There's a trick to ellipses. They get deeper the farther down or up from your eye level. The bottom ellipse looking down on a can will be a bit rounder than the top one, if its middle is exactly at eye level the top will curve up and the bottom curve down evenly and any grooves become shallower till the center groove is a straight horizontal. Try this with a long cylinder like a couple of paper towel tubes taped together so the horizon is distinct - set that up so you're on eye level with the taped join and see how the ellipses look. It helps a lot with so many things, even bodies in foreshortening.

eyepaint
08-06-2014, 10:20 AM
Welcome! Thank you for joining and for starting your art-making journey. As others said, practice often (every day if you can!) and draw items from life (a bookcase in front of you, a bed beside you...) because you learn a lot from that.

Nuunc
02-19-2015, 06:02 PM
Sorry for the inactivity. I had a serious mishap with work but I am back to practicing.

I wasn't sure how to change the name of the thread and I don't have the other photos I uploaded on here to resize them smaller so I remade it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1373091