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View Full Version : Tendrils - need help with photos


Emerlyearts
07-13-2014, 10:03 PM
This is another blotched ink background. I'm feeling frustrated with the quality of my photographs. This board looks so much better in person. Photographing my boards seems to be a hit or miss enterprise. Too much light and these white clayboards with blotched in have wicked glare. Too little and nothing shows up. Natural indirect light seems best. I can never seem to pick up the wonderful quality of the original. For this view I had to keep the dpi at 300 and make it incredibly small (300 pixels) Any larger and it looks bad. Any ideas?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jul-2014/997712-140717_Tendrils_Scratchb_-_WMKweb_300.jpg

Foxyheart2002
07-13-2014, 10:11 PM
No ideas here. I am also having problems with my camera AND my scanner Neither seem to do the art justice at all. Just know you have a sympathetic friend!

scratchmaster
07-13-2014, 11:25 PM
What is the camera you are using? Are you using a tripod? Unless the light is just right it may be difficult to get a perfect exposure with the camera. Are you using Photoshop or some other photo editor to make adjustments?

ggart4u
07-14-2014, 06:51 AM
A scanner?

Emerlyearts
07-14-2014, 08:36 AM
My scanner is too old to do well with scratchboard. It works fine with line drawings and solid colors, like watercolor. I do use Photoshop to adjust my images. I should probably get back to using a tripod. I need to rig up a device so I can shoot straight down.

scratchmaster
07-14-2014, 09:29 AM
A scanner would take care of the glare for sure, but isn't as likely to give accurate color if it's old. A digital camera will give better color, but if you're not using a tripod, it's going to be difficult to get the images super sharp. If it were me I would shoot on a tripod, outside, preferably on a bright but overcast day, under the shade of a parking deck or a park pavilion with a high ceiling. That would give lots of indirect light and would cut down on glare. I would hang the work vertically, and do my best to get the camera aimed right at the center to avoid perspective. It's good to shoot zoomed in to cut down on lens distortion that tends to curve straight lines.

Emerlyearts
07-14-2014, 12:28 PM
Thanks scratchmaster. I'll take your suggestions and work on this.

PaintDog
07-15-2014, 02:15 AM
Russ has given good advice. Also, if you happen to have a camera that will accept filters on the lens, get a polarizing filter, those are amazing at cutting out the glare from the reflection off the background. Take a photo at different exposures too (if your camera has that option), if you're using a tripod, you'll get the exact same image with different exposures that you can layer in Photoshop to combine for the best possible effect.

Trilby
07-15-2014, 04:27 PM
Whatever the photo quality, I greatly enjoy your works. They are a bit magical.
TJ

FoggyMountain
07-15-2014, 10:46 PM
Another pretty piece with a lot of interest.

SandeVBL
07-16-2014, 07:20 AM
Beautiful piece!