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amature
06-05-2014, 08:52 PM
A newbie, from ages ago, returning to oil painting for something to do in retirement.

Probably sounds a silly question. When searching how to make Liquid white, the white is always Titanium.

I have a 1/3 of a 60ml tube which I want to use up, any reason not to use it to make Liquid white, after all white it white

Mythrill
06-05-2014, 09:00 PM
A newbie, from ages ago, returning to oil painting for something to do in retirement.

Probably sounds a silly question. When searching how to make Liquid white, the white is always Titanium.

I have a 1/3 of a 60ml tube which I want to use up, any reason not to use it to make Liquid white, after all white it white

It's not, really. We have at least 3 major whites in most media: Titanium White (PW 6,) Lead White (PW 1,) and Zinc White (PW 4.)

Then, in Egg Tempera, you have at least calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate. Those have very low tinting power in oils and acrylics, but they can be made as substitutes for the toxic (oils) and incompatible (acrylics) Lead White.

sidbledsoe
06-05-2014, 11:09 PM
I have a 1/3 of a 60ml tube which I want to use up, any reason not to use it to make Liquid white, after all white it white
What type of white is your tube?

amature
06-06-2014, 08:34 AM
A newbie, from ages ago, returning to oil painting for something to do in retirement.

Probably sounds a silly question. When searching how to make Liquid white, the white is always Titanium.

I have a 1/3 of a 60ml tube which I want to use up, any reason not to use it to make Liquid white, after all white it white

Sorry sidbledsoe should have said it is flake white by Winsor Newton

sidbledsoe
06-06-2014, 10:37 AM
Yes, you can still make a liquid white with flake white.
The purpose of liquid white is to provide a thin and light white base that is slow drying and allows for adding colors that can then be smoothed out and blended, mainly the background sky and water areas. Any good white can work, titanium is just the most popular and often used white by all oil painters. But flake white isn't as strong tinting or opaque as titanium, so it may require a bit less color addition when you start painting, if you are used to using a titanium liquid white.
Most recipes I have seen recommend adding some linseed stand oil and maybe a bit of solvent. Just be cautious of adding too much of these which may rapidly get the mix too thinly diluted, and you don't want that, then you will need to add more white paint.

WFMartin
06-06-2014, 11:34 AM
Although I have never done it, I have always felt that if I were to try to make something comparable to "Liquid White", I would use Walnut oil as the drying oil, along with Odorless Mineral Spirits.

Walnut Oil dries slower than Linseed, which is a characteristic that seems important when you set out to complete a painting in one session, working while it remains wet. Another characteristic of Walnut Oil is that is imparts a slippery "feel", or consistency to the paint. This is very important when doing the wet-in-wet blending that Bob Ross does.

Nobody really seems to know the ingredients in his Liquid White, but it surely can't be very complicated. It just needs to dry slowly, and be "slick", as Bob often mentions. Walnut Oil seems to fit those specifications.

sidbledsoe
06-06-2014, 12:09 PM
yeah, it works fine with ordinary linseed or walnut, both will stay wet more than long enough for this style of wet on wet painting. What is important is mixing it until with the oil until it is the right consistency, you want it to be nice and creamy with some body, but as I cautioned, too thin and slippery is not good, when you begin blending with the dry large brush, it needs some of that body to it so it will stay in place and not be running or drippy.