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Christian Skeel
05-27-2014, 07:19 AM
I have made the palettes of some masterpieces.
It can be inspiring to study the master's palettes.

Let me know if you have a favourite masterpiece that you would like to have the palette from and I will post it on the website.

You can download the palettes free on my website:
http://sensuallogic.com/paintmaker/the-master-s-palettes.html

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-May-2014/1730221-The-Masters-palettes.jpeg

sidbledsoe
05-27-2014, 08:29 AM
Isn't this sampling the mixes they made for particular individual paintings rather than what their palettes were composed of?
I am sure I could mix all of those colors from my palette of colors.

budigart
05-27-2014, 10:19 AM
Agreed. There is a book out there titled The Big Book of Oil Color in which the author shows how to mix hundreds of colors using Prussian blue, cad yellow medium, alizarin crimson and white. Of course, there are other three-color (red,blue,yellow) combinations that will do the same thing.

arnoud3272
05-27-2014, 02:02 PM
Well, I guess the OP is using the word palette in the Photoshop definition (http://www.tutorial9.net/tutorials/photoshop-tutorials/using-palettes-in-photoshop/).

sidbledsoe
05-27-2014, 02:03 PM
Here is also a blog with some actual used palettes:
http://thatslikewhoa.com/actual-palettes-of-famous-painters/

The big caveat with sampling online reproductions is that the colors from that source are not accurate to begin with, and the color variations of the images can be strikingly different.

Christian Skeel
05-27-2014, 03:02 PM
The point of the palettes isn't to reproduce the original paintings or to use the same technique but rather to give a frame to start painting from. Beginning with a white canvas and a palette of colors directly from the tubes is challenging in a way that often results in the same approach from painting to painting. I personally like a new framework when I start painting. I like knowing as little as possible when I start painting so I have to be very observant.
So please don't compare my palettes with the techniques used in the painting I have taken them from.

Mythrill
05-27-2014, 05:49 PM
The point of the palettes isn't to reproduce the original paintings or to use the same technique but rather to give a frame to start painting from. Beginning with a white canvas and a palette of colors directly from the tubes is challenging in a way that often results in the same approach from painting to painting. I personally like a new framework when I start painting. I like knowing as little as possible when I start painting so I have to be very observant.
So please don't compare my palettes with the techniques used in the painting I have taken them from.

Hi, Christian!

The problem with this approach is that many paintings from the 19th to the mid-20th century have discolored badly.

The Picasso paint you've shown is probably an example. It's very possible that the woman's complexion was a bit lighter, more vibrant and "rosy," but that this faded over time.

Substitutes for Alizarin Crimson (PR 83) and Madder Lake (NR 5) were only available in the early 60's. Winsor & Newton lists them as being the first to introduce a substitute, listing "Permanent Rose" (PV 19-gamma) as the replacement.

Christian Skeel
05-28-2014, 12:22 AM
Hi Mythrill

I doesn't matter if the paintings has discolored or if the reproduction aren't exactly the same as the original paintings in this case. The idea with the palettes are not to study the original paintings in any way. The idea is to let oneself be inspired by having mainly to use a specified set of colors. Starting your painting with a preset color set helps you avoid choosing colors in the beginning which can be dangerous since it is very difficult not to start designing instead of keepong an open mind.

Hi, Christian!

The problem with this approach is that many paintings from the 19th to the mid-20th century have discolored badly.

The Picasso paint you've shown is probably an example. It's very possible that the woman's complexion was a bit lighter, more vibrant and "rosy," but that this faded over time.

Substitutes for Alizarin Crimson (PR 83) and Madder Lake (NR 5) were only available in the early 60's. Winsor & Newton lists them as being the first to introduce a substitute, listing "Permanent Rose" (PV 19-gamma) as the replacement.

Christian Skeel
05-30-2014, 07:17 AM
Hi Mythrill
you made me doubt I used the word palette correctly. Palette can be understood in two ways:
a : the set of colors put on the palette
b (1) : a particular range, quality, or use of color (2) : a comparable range, quality, or use of available elements <a rich palette of tones and timbres> <a palette of flavors>
In my case palette is used in the later meaning.

Mythrill
05-30-2014, 02:25 PM
Hi Mythrill
you made me doubt I used the word palette correctly. Palette can be understood in two ways:
a : the set of colors put on the palette
b (1) : a particular range, quality, or use of color (2) : a comparable range, quality, or use of available elements <a rich palette of tones and timbres> <a palette of flavors>
In my case palette is used in the later meaning.

I guess it's accurate to say that this system can reproduce the hues you see in the painting, but not tell you the actual pigments.

You can sure do some color mixing with Phthalo Green (PG 7,) desaturate it, and make it look like a 19th century Viridian (PG 18.) It can be accurate enough to confuse even an experienced artist in telling the difference. In this sense, yeah, you can generate a palette of hues.

What this system cannot do is to tell if that green you see is the result of mixing Viridian (PG 18) with some Chrome Yellow (PY 34,) or used pure, or glazed. In this sense, this system can't replicate the original palette of pigments because any mix that matches what you see in the photo will do.

A great color theory that focuses on the hues you see is the Munsell system. They have some color chips that describe colors hues in a completely unambiguous notation. Have you checked the book out?

Youssef
05-30-2014, 03:49 PM
Those are not palettes but rather colors used during a single painting. If you see other Picasso paintings you will notice he used every color you can imagine.

Christian Skeel
05-31-2014, 05:50 PM
It is apparently difficult for me to explain that the idear with showing a range of colors used within one painting is to study the color balance the painter has choosen when he or she decided that the painting was finished. Most modern painters have been all over the place with all combinations of colors but also with wax, lead, dirt etc as pigments. There are so many things in a painting that is impossible to show in an image on the web. Sigmar Polke's painting on my web site is mainly made with wax and oil to give the yellow tone which gives a very fine depth that you can't see here. So forget about how these master pieces was made and use the color choises made as inspiration for new paintings.

Those are not palettes but rather colors used during a single painting. If you see other Picasso paintings you will notice he used every color you can imagine.

Mythrill
05-31-2014, 07:07 PM
It is apparently difficult for me to explain that the idear with showing a range of colors used within one painting is to study the color balance the painter has choosen when he or she decided that the painting was finished. Most modern painters have been all over the place with all combinations of colors but also with wax, lead, dirt etc as pigments. There are so many things in a painting that is impossible to show in an image on the web. Sigmar Polke's painting on my web site is mainly made with wax and oil to give the yellow tone which gives a very fine depth that you can't see here. So forget about how these master pieces was made and use the color choises made as inspiration for new paintings.

No, I actually get your point that an artist could have used everything at his disposal to paint. The dreadful "Bitumen" would be just one of these substances.

I just happen not to agree with it. I like being able to reproduce paintings as closely as possible to what I think a certain artist used or what people around his era used, or what I think they used.

Just because I like to do that, that doesn't mean I'd throw your method away. It would be great when you don't can't figure out at all what pigment an artist used, and/or you want to use your own materials to fill that gap.

Of course, a different person could approach things differently. :)