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Ead
09-27-2003, 01:25 AM
I'm always impress with the painting of the impressionist and others who paint other beautiful (or sometime some strange) colors to the subject rather than the local color e.g. pink or even ultramarine blue on the skin tone or white petals.

Is there any clue to consider which color to be used to replace the local color? Is it about cool color replace cool local color at the same value?

How to train myself to see other colors than the local colors or do I have to change the mindset?

Thanks everyone in advance who can give the info.

Best regards,
Ead

Dyin
09-27-2003, 11:02 AM
I'm sure some others will have more technical answers than I, but it's something I'm working on myself, especially with skin tones. First look hard at things...skin can be leaning towards red or yellow for the warm areas and the cool areas, shadows, veins are in blue and green tones...each person is a little different, some skin looks to have shades of violet in them. White can have color in it...pastel pinks, blues and yellows, depends on how the light is bouncing...warm colors in lit areas and cool in dark...look at everything and try really hard to see the colors that are hidden there....our brains simplify things....look at a cloud...brain says white, but if you look, you'll start seeing the colors, it's a matter of training and then being brave and experimenting with your work...the colors you see in things can be downplayed or exaggerated, that's up to you...also look at leaves...is it a yellow or red or blue green...just keep looking hard and eventually you will start recognizing what you see...

Dyin
09-27-2003, 11:08 AM
I'm sure some others will have more technical answers than I, but it's something I'm working on myself, especially with skin tones. First look hard at things...skin can be leaning towards red or yellow for the warm areas and the cool areas, shadows, veins are in blue and green tones...each person is a little different, some skin looks to have shades of violet in them. White can have color in it...pastel pinks, blues and yellows, depends on how the light is bouncing...warm colors in lit areas and cool in dark...look at everything and try really hard to see the colors that are hidden there....our brains simplify things....look at a cloud...brain says white, but if you look, you'll start seeing the colors, it's a matter of training and then being brave and experimenting with your work...the colors you see in things can be downplayed or exaggerated, that's up to you...also look at leaves...is it a yellow or red or blue green...just keep looking hard and eventually you will start recognizing what you see...

Stoy Jones
09-27-2003, 11:55 AM
Dyin, you repeated yourself ;)

Since I started working with pastels, I had this problem in deciding what colors are actually there as opposed to what I see. The still-life I did of the apples and wine bottle, it was easy to put in black for shadows that fell on a white sheet. The instructor suggested using a cool purple and it really worked well.

After using that suggestion, and following it, I looked for that color and started to 'see' it on the still-life I was working from. I suppose it is a matter of not thinking in simple colors and perhaps not relying on black and white for lights and darks.

Stoy