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bluesmoosh
04-06-2014, 01:27 PM
I struggle to identify the temperature of colors. For example, I've heard that lamp black is a cool black, flake white is warm, alizarin crimson is cool and cadmium red is warm, etc.... How do you know? Is there a trick to it? I get the basic concept of color temperature, but the identification of colors in practice is difficult for me.

arnoud3272
04-06-2014, 01:51 PM
Hi,
You could start with this thread (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1342572).
:thumbsup:.

bluesmoosh
04-06-2014, 02:18 PM
Thanks! I did try to search the forums but just kept getting an error page. :/

0chre
04-07-2014, 04:23 AM
I struggle to identify the temperature of colors. [...] I get the basic concept of color temperature, but the identification of colors in practice is difficult for me.I wouldn't use color temperature then. Thinking about color this way is IMO only useful if it comes more or less naturally to you. There are other ways to understanding and using color, that may suit you better.

Apodemus
04-07-2014, 06:51 AM
I struggle to identify the temperature of colors. For example, I've heard that lamp black is a cool black, flake white is warm, alizarin crimson is cool and cadmium red is warm, etc.... How do you know? Is there a trick to it? I get the basic concept of color temperature, but the identification of colors in practice is difficult for me.

I think the trick, if there is one, is to remember that a colour is only warm or cool compared to something else. So, to use your example, alizarin crimson has more blue in it than does cadmium red, so it would be considered a cool red. On the other hand, compared with any of the blues, it would be considered warm. It only makes sense to consider relative temperature.

Mike

everelusive
04-09-2014, 07:33 PM
Interesting Ochre.....

I find it easier to think of a colour being (for example) a yellow that either leans toward magenta or cyan as opposed to being warmer or cooler (which I understand to mean that the colour mixed into the base is either clockwise or counter clockwise on the colour wheel from the base)

But I only adopted this 3 variable system after getting confused about the temperature of blacks/browns and just couldn't get my head around how you could use a binary description of a system with 3 variables.

Gigalot
04-10-2014, 05:24 AM
I struggle to identify the temperature of colors. For example, I've heard that lamp black is a cool black, flake white is warm, alizarin crimson is cool and cadmium red is warm, etc.... How do you know? Is there a trick to it? I get the basic concept of color temperature, but the identification of colors in practice is difficult for me.

Once I tried to understand how to make an orange color warmer. However, I found that Blue and Orange colors have their own, separate color wheels. An Orange color wheel and a Blue color wheel, while other colors have a linear graphics from cool to warm hue.

DMSS
04-10-2014, 06:37 PM
Interesting Ochre.....

I find it easier to think of a colour being (for example) a yellow that either leans toward magenta or cyan as opposed to being warmer or cooler (which I understand to mean that the colour mixed into the base is either clockwise or counter clockwise on the colour wheel from the base)

But I only adopted this 3 variable system after getting confused about the temperature of blacks/browns and just couldn't get my head around how you could use a binary description of a system with 3 variables.

This makes a lot of sense to me. Thank you for sharing it.

opainter
04-11-2014, 01:23 AM
Once I tried to understand how to make an orange color warmer. However, I found that Blue and Orange colors have their own, separate color wheels. An Orange color wheel and a Blue color wheel, while other colors have a linear graphics from cool to warm hue.

You can make colors other than orange and blue warmer by making them more orange, and you can make colors other than orange and blue cooler by making them more blue. You can't make orange more orange, and if you try to make blue more orange, you get black. You can't make blue more blue, and if you try to make orange more blue, you get black. Is that right? :confused:

How are the blue and orange color wheels different from the main color wheel? Do they include variation in the chroma instead of in the hue? :confused:

What you said is interesting, and I am trying to make sense of it. :thumbsup:

everelusive
04-11-2014, 04:32 AM
Thank you DMSS, absolutely my pleasure.

0chre
04-11-2014, 05:43 AM
You can make colors other than orange and blue warmer by making them more orange, and you can make colors other than orange and blue cooler by making them more blue. You can't make orange more orange, and if you try to make blue more orange, you get black. You can't make blue more blue, and if you try to make orange more blue, you get black. Is that right?

How are the blue and orange color wheels different from the main color wheel? Do they include variation in the chroma instead of in the hue? I see it like this: In the case of colors that have a distinct temperature (I consider only magenta and green as neutral in temperature, the rest, I would say, are warm or cold) lowering the chroma is also a temperature shift. A color in its full chroma is most pronounced. Lowering chroma makes its charcacter less obvious, so a cool color will become less cool and a warm color will become less warm. This way you can create temperature variations without changing the hue (which can be less than desirable for your color harmony).