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ArtfulJosh
03-13-2014, 06:08 PM
I've always just worked w/ mainly pencils. I did watercolor and color theory in school, and just kinda went away from that. I've been wanting to do comics for awhile but I find myself not too skilled at sequential art and more kinda a one frame kind of guy. So I'm thinking about working on comic books covers, and just covers in general. I recently watched a documentary about Drew Struzan and his poster work, and found out he did colored pencil over acrylic. So I'm wondering many many things, what is good and not too expensive acrylic.

What are some good and not expensive brushes.

What are some good gessos.

A good fixative for the graphite work.

Am I able to use colored pencil over the dried acrylic?

Do I need to thin out the paint?

Also what is a good kind of way of starting to make my own canvases without spending a ton.



Woot. ^^

jocko500
03-13-2014, 06:33 PM
I bought my paints on sell that the line was going out of so it was like $2.15 each. good paint I think up to a point. brushes you can buy on sell too. I use a canvas that have a water color surface I find at Hobby lobby. I think it good and it a little cheaper that canvas. never used color pencils on anything so I do not know. there is a market for comics.
oh you can watch youtube on how to put the canvas on the canvas frame. that how I learn but have not done it yet. looks easy. Gesso use the pro stuff. not worth the money to get cheap gesso

idylbrush
03-13-2014, 06:58 PM
I've always just worked w/ mainly pencils. I did watercolor and color theory in school, and just kinda went away from that. I've been wanting to do comics for awhile but I find myself not too skilled at sequential art and more kinda a one frame kind of guy. So I'm thinking about working on comic books covers, and just covers in general. I recently watched a documentary about Drew Struzan and his poster work, and found out he did colored pencil over acrylic. So I'm wondering many many things, what is good and not too expensive acrylic.

What are some good and not expensive brushes.

What are some good gessos.

A good fixative for the graphite work.

Am I able to use colored pencil over the dried acrylic?

Do I need to thin out the paint?

Also what is a good kind of way of starting to make my own canvases without spending a ton.
^^

A good starting acrylic paint is a company brand. i.e. Daniel Smith or Dick Blick. High quality at a reasonable price, especially if on sale.

Brushes, again look at house brands. I prefer synthetic bristle over natural bristle.

Gesso, again look at house brands.

You should be able to use colored pencil over acrylics. There is a really good artist/illustrator on here that uses colored pencil over acrylic all the time. I can't recall his screen name at the moment.

You may or may not choose to thin acrylics, depends on your painting style.

If you are really economy minded start with acrylic paper. If you go to my youtube channel you can see a very simple method I have used for quite a while for making panels. There is a link in my signature line.

hope that helps a little.

Charlie's Mum
03-13-2014, 07:05 PM
Yes, you can use col pencils over acrylic - the heavier the acrylic the more pencil you'll use - you'll get finer pencil work over thinner acrylics.

Liquitex Student grade and System Three by DalerRowney are good inexpensive paints to start with but generally, the Artist grade paints have better pigment load - which matters if you want to thin the paint.

I use cheap synthetic brushes - personal choice - though I also have good quality ones. But acrylics are heavy on brushes because the paint dries quickly and one tends to 'scrub' more than with w/colours or oils.
I like Daler Graduate brushes - in the UK they sell for around 2 - $2.80? or so in the US

If you need fixative, better a quality one than cheapo! The Coloured Pencil forum might help there - also Drawing and sketching forum - both here on WC!

Thinning ac. paint usually means a less dense covering, so if you want flat, solid colour, it will take a few layers of thinner paint ... you'll need to experiment to find out! You can use water or a medium to thin the paint.

You can paint on any surface - doesn't have to be canvas - so, paper, card etc.

Use a good gessos - better covering power.

Look in the Information Kiosk (link in my signature) and find the Classroom Index, then look up a thread by Einion - Supports and their preparation.

Fox_eNova
03-14-2014, 06:59 AM
Josh,
I make my own gallery wrap canvases, but it takes a bit of work and a small investment.
If you want to build your own take a look here: (http://eharder.com/Art/misc/DIY%20Stretcher%20Frame.html)

Davkin
03-14-2014, 02:07 PM
#1. Winsor Newton University line.
http://www.dickblick.com/products/winsor-and-newton-long-handle-university-brushes/
Not the cheapest but not expensive, I think they are great bang for the buck. Not too stiff, not too soft and pretty durable for the price.

#2. I use a no-name gesso you can buy by the gallon at Michaels' use a coupon and it only comes to about $25 for the whole gallon. I believe that call it "Art Essentials" or something like that. It was worked well for me, I'm on my second bucket.

#3. I'd imagine any workable fixative would do the job, I personally find it unnecessary.

#4. I have no personal experience with CP over acrylic but I believe I've read about others doing. I'd imagine you'd want to use the softer brands such as Derwent.

#5. Thinning is usually not needed unless you are using wash techniques. I personally avoid watering my paint down, if I want my paint more transparent I use glazing medium.

#6. Forget the canvas, instead make your own gesso boards. Got to the hardware store and buy some 1/8" MDF. If you don't have a good box cutter get one, or have the store cut up the MDF for you into the sizes you want, or if you want to cut them as needed use the box cutter, (unless you own a table saw, then use that!) it takes 2 or 3 passes but cuts well enough, then you'll want to sand the edges smooth. Ideally you should seal the MDF before applying gesso but if it's just for practice I wouldn't worry about it. In fact just the other day I threw away a bunch years old practice paintings that were painted on unsealed MDF and they looked fine. I then use a fine foam roller to apply the gesso, usually three coats. The fine foam roller gives a nice, uniform texture, (if the texture comes out too rough you need to thin the gesso a bit).

For paint, I personally wouldn't bother with the student grade, even when starting out, the low pigment load and coarseness of the pigment will often just lead to frustration. I've always only used artist grade, currently that's usually Liquitex heavy body.

David

cinderblockstudios
03-15-2014, 09:11 AM
Brushes: Visit your local art store and feel them. For acrylics the idea is to lean toward synthetic brushes. If you're looking for a solid brand check out Liquitex's Free Style range.

Gesso: Again at your art store you'll find various gesso brands there. Pick one. Any of them will work, because those that actually produce it, make sure that it's right.

Fixative: Cheap and easy to find you can get Krylon, but again your local art store will have some that should be fine.

Colored Pencil over Acrylic: To some degree you can, neither is desined to accept each other that much. Acrylics will dry with a smooth surface which doesn't always accept the waxy nature of colored pencils. Thin layers of acrylic on paper will allow for this technique to work, but canvas probably won't.

Thinning: You only have to thin the paint if you want to, but as mentioned before acrylics don't always accept pencils.

Canvas: Buy some stretcher bars at your art store, then get some canvas drop cloth from your local hardware store. The canvas quality isn't great, but the low price for such a large amount makes it worth it if you are one a budget.

Hope this all helps!