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DillpickleNZ
03-05-2014, 01:42 AM
Hi all,
I've just taken up the brush again after a couple of years hiatus and found one or two of my paints pretty yuk and am wondering if I should just chuck them or is there a way to revitalise them.
I said yuk, not really knowing how to describe the consistency, but when I first opened the tube and squeezed, some yukky stuff came out that was not paint, it looked more like oily-grease with a smidgeon of colour.
Is there anyone out there who knows what I'm talking about and can tell me if this paint is ready to biff or is there something I can do to recover it?
The ones in particular are Atelier Impasto Artist's Acrylic in a plastic tube.
I've tried to 'massage' the tube to remix the content without much luck.
Look forward to your reply, Emma

Mij
03-05-2014, 03:42 AM
I bought some System Three acrylics at least 22 years ago. I had never used them. I had a warm and cool of each primary plus white and black.
I hauled them out of hiding this past Christmas and when I tried using them I got the same as you had - a lot of gunk.
The paint had separated from its carrier.
I shook them up (they were in plastic containers) and tried again - voila - colours!
I then made up a colour wheel by mixing - tedious, but never the less fun!
If yours are in tubes then it may be more difficult to 'mix' them again especially if they are full and no room to squidge them to and fro.
Pleases let us know the outcome.
jim

idylbrush
03-05-2014, 07:41 AM
Sounds as though the paint has separated. It hasn't hurt the paint any. It may be a bit thicker but that isn't a real issue. Add some soft medium or liquid medium if you want to alter the consistency.

If it smells bad then it has most likely molded and should be thrown out.

DillpickleNZ
03-07-2014, 12:16 AM
Sounds as though the paint has separated. It hasn't hurt the paint any. It may be a bit thicker but that isn't a real issue. Add some soft medium or liquid medium if you want to alter the consistency.

If it smells bad then it has most likely molded and should be thrown out.
Yes, I'm sure that's the problem, the paint has separated, but it was not thick, quite the opposite, it's thin and oily with very little colour!

Jim, luckily it is in a plastic tube and so i could massage it and squeeze it to the point of most of the printing coming off, but voilà, it's become more usable.

Mij
03-07-2014, 04:07 AM
Yes, I'm sure that's the problem, the paint has separated, but it was not thick, quite the opposite, it's thin and oily with very little colour!

Jim, luckily it is in a plastic tube and so i could massage it and squeeze it to the point of most of the printing coming off, but voilà, it's become more usable.

Yes just like mine. What came out the spout was thin and almost transparent. I quickly realized what had happened and shook the container up and down to mix up the contents again. IIRC it took a couple of times before I saw any change. But I had heard of this before - also I was determined to try everything before throwing what was otherwise brand new paints. It had just stayed on the shelf longer than recommended Tee hee :lol:
I hope your luck proves equally good.:crossfingers:
jim

Charlie's Mum
03-07-2014, 06:19 AM
As the others have said, sounds like the binder separating and that's what's coming out - keep squeezing and thicker pigment will emerge!
worth doing then, what Idylbrush says, add some medium to make it the consistency you want - always worth a try before discarding.

Also as Idylbrush says, if it's smelly, ie mouldy, it's probably past redemption ;)

My old Systems 3 did that with a couple of colours but were still usable.

janinco
03-07-2014, 12:52 PM
I use a bamboo skewer and plunge it up and down in the tube to remix (kind of like a butter churn). The earth colors seem to do this more readily in watercolor and acrylics.

Jan

ThickPainting
07-13-2014, 02:06 AM
This is an exciting topic, actually. I too, went through the great remorse of what looked like wasted paint. True, stirring can sometimes revive it, or adding slight bit of medium.

What I found is a whole new approach to "aged paint" creating some actual artwork pieces because of it's textures that are not quite the same as trying to get them on your own, although, you can try. Here are a few examples of neat abstracts that turned out:

"Copper Paradigm"

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jul-2014/1675743-copper_paradigm.jpg

I had these paint bottles of not too old paint, but lumpy, so intended to not throw them away, but waste them onto a paintskin, build up texture to cut up and use as textures in a later painting, but when I wasted SO MUCH of it there, I thought there has to be a better use of this brilliant color, even if lumpy, so without a paintbrush or tool, I just applied the palette to a deep edge canvas, and slid it off. Kept adding to it, 'till all sides were made.

Decided it was so cool, but how to describe it so collectors won't think it's "old paint" and second hand intentions? I came up with "aged" to perfection, like wine or cheese. I keep discovering a few of these old paint bottles and new paintings coming from them. The trick is to use them in a way that helps promote quality.



"Cheeto Lava"

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jul-2014/1675743-Cheeto_Lava_Skin2.jpg

This last one is a paintskin I just kept pouring this oozing liquid of binder separated from the paint. The cheeto colored rocks also came from the same bottle... one element complete liquid, the other totally dried up and spongy even, lumps. Huge lumps. But they did way shrink since drying. Is still cool. Best of all, since it's fluorescent, it glows in the dark! The problem to keep in mind is to avoid separation of paint in not deteriorating on you. Perhaps a sealing of some kind ultimately.

Mythrill
07-13-2014, 10:28 AM
Hi all,
I've just taken up the brush again after a couple of years hiatus and found one or two of my paints pretty yuk and am wondering if I should just chuck them or is there a way to revitalise them.
I said yuk, not really knowing how to describe the consistency, but when I first opened the tube and squeezed, some yukky stuff came out that was not paint, it looked more like oily-grease with a smidgeon of colour.
Is there anyone out there who knows what I'm talking about and can tell me if this paint is ready to biff or is there something I can do to recover it?
The ones in particular are Atelier Impasto Artist's Acrylic in a plastic tube.
I've tried to 'massage' the tube to remix the content without much luck.
Look forward to your reply, Emma
Hi, Dill!

As everyone said, what happened to your paint is that your binder (what holds your paint) has separated from the color.

Here's what you'll need:
A heavy, flat glass object.
Glass surface.
A mix of 50% alcohol, 50% water.
Household ammonia (very important – to keep the acrylic emulsion alkaline!)
Acrylic retarder (diethylene glycol, for instance.)
Palette knife.
A new container.How to do it:
Put the glass surface in a completely plain place and then open your container.
Using your palette knife, throw the paint and the binder in the glass.
Add the alcohol and water blend.
Add 2-3 drops of ammonia.
Get the flat object and start re-mulling your paint. Go slowly, and don't stop until it has a creamy consistency.
Start by adding 2-3 drops of retarder. This is important to "trap" the water into the paint and preventing it to dry again while stored.
Use your palette knife to get some of the paint and test it using some scrap paper. If the paint disperses evenly, you can stop here and start the storage.
If the paint is not creamy yet, slowly add some of the alcohol and water blend and retarder and keep mulling. Repeat step 7.After you're done, just get your knife and move the paint to a new container. Your paint should be as new and stable now!

Dill, if you're not sure on how to mull your own paint, I suggest reading this thread: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1351502.

We were originally discussing about why umbers are so different, but the discussion turned out about making your own paint. You can see what you can use as a muller and glass surface there. :)

Just a warning, though: the materials used there are oil-specific! Since we're talking about acrylics here, the solvents you'll use instead are the alcohol and water mix.

I hope this helps, Dill!

idylbrush
07-13-2014, 12:07 PM
When i was doing stained glasswprk I mulled paint quite frequently. there is a glass muller that would work well for paints as well. A less expensive option would be to buy a new tube.