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Christian Skeel
02-28-2014, 05:22 AM
Does anyone know how to calculate artist paint mixes from RGB values?

kinasi
02-28-2014, 06:46 AM
http://www.goldenpaints.com/products/mixer/ if you click the color it gives you the rgb vallue

Christian Skeel
03-01-2014, 10:44 PM
Thanks Kinasi. I know about Golden's mixer. But I am looking for somebody doing the same with oil colors. Do you know any?

WFMartin
03-02-2014, 09:54 PM
Does anyone know how to calculate artist paint mixes from RGB values?

Nope. Those are the primary color of light, not pigments. Each primary color of pigment reflects not one, but two of each of those primary colors of the white light spectrum.

Patrick1
03-03-2014, 05:36 AM
Photoshop shows you the RGB value of colors in a digital image but going from RGB to paint is much more complicated.

I bought a software package years back which takes any digital image (which could be a digital photo or a scanned photo) and posterizes it into fragments of colors and then tells you which paint colors and proportions to use, in order to 'match' the colors in the original photo. But it requires you to use one of the few specified paint brands - paints whose color specs are in the database.

I haven't tried it yet but I'd be curious to see how well (or poorly!) it works. It would be fun to do this: take a photo of a real painting, follow the software's specified recipes to replicate the photo using paint, then when finished, compare the new 'recipe' painting with the actual painting, side-by-side. It would be interesting to see how close or how 'off' it would be.

I know very little about color conversion so I'd be interested in hearing others' experience - particularly what is possible, and what the limitations are in converting RGB values to artist paint.

briantmeyer
03-10-2014, 02:43 PM
Why not just convert it to cmyk, and use equivalent pigments to cmyk. You can tailor the conversion to use very little black ( for like watercolor ) or lots of black as well. You just need to find the correct pigments that handle cmy. Then you need to know how to use that yourself, to adjust the recipe for certain colors like orange, or things like burnt sienna, or even into specialty paints that create effects.

A lot of that is actually a sense you have to develop, seeing a color, then knowing what to mix to get that color. Of course that does not deal with layering, like glazes/scumbles, nor does it help you put colors under other colors to make the color on top almost glow.

kinasi
03-10-2014, 06:59 PM
CMYK in printers is very different from paint mixing though, the thousands of bubbles from a printer don't tend to mix on the paper, printers exploit the space between bubbles to get tones and how colors add when you see them next to each other

if a printer wants a dark yellow, it will put dots of black next to yellow dots, it will never try to mix a dark yellow

Christian Skeel
03-30-2014, 05:47 AM
You can get paint mixes from rgb values here:
http://sensuallogic.com/paintmaker/Online.html

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Mar-2014/1730221-image.jpg

briantmeyer
04-03-2014, 07:42 PM
CMYK in printers is very different from paint mixing though, the thousands of bubbles from a printer don't tend to mix on the paper, printers exploit the space between bubbles to get tones and how colors add when you see them next to each other

if a printer wants a dark yellow, it will put dots of black next to yellow dots, it will never try to mix a dark yellow

It's the same percentages. It's just mixing visually instead of via paint, which can vary based on the paint involved. There is actual Cyan, Magenta and Yellow Gouache which designers use to mock up illustrations intended for printing. You'd have to figure out the amount of black or white for some mediums, others you just vary how solid you apply it.

Three colors is a small palette ( small gamut ), the problem colors are oranges and blues. ( greens seem to work as is since most greens you actually want are not that intense ).

You can adjust the black used in the color via the UCR and GCR curves, and can just use CMY and ignore the K. ( you can google that ) The K is not actually there for anything except it work as a kicker, because it looks better, and the curve works to decide when to replace the CMY color with black. You have to still understand that you'd have to adjust the value by adding black, by adding white, or by diluting the pigment.

The nice thing is that if you have photoshop, you can use the info palette to see the color used, and the technology for this I'd assume is pretty well tested. The hard part is that you have to eyeball your mixes, make sure your cyan is like printer. I am sure there are better things to use, but if you have it, this does work.

Christian Skeel
02-11-2016, 09:33 AM
The online paint mix calculator PaintMaker now works with Schmincke's Norma Professional Oils and with Winsor and Newton's Galeria acrylics.
http://sensuallogic.com/paintmaker/OnlinePaintMixer/index.html

opainter
02-11-2016, 10:44 PM
Christian, I am glad to see that you have added some more paint lines to your application! Thanks! :thumbsup:

Christian Skeel
02-12-2016, 03:28 PM
Christian, I am glad to see that you have added some more paint lines to your application! Thanks! :thumbsup:

And there are several more on the way:-) I just take ages to make each paint set. 🤔